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  • Duct Rodders

    I saw that Vance_G uses a 5/16 duct rodder to push out a seesnake on long runs. They are not cheap for what they are. 1/4" though is cheaper then 1/2"
    I would like to hear of sizes others use. I plan on using it to get out 300ft on pvc 6" lines. Or also using it to get out say 100ft in a really bad 4" clay line. I need this because some lines are so bad and you can only get out 60-70 feet even with soap and water on the fullsize. So I usually tell the customer thats it sorry I can't get any farther and don't want to ruin my equipment. But with the duct rodder helping out it will reduce the chance of pushrod damage. Another thing for a small 1/4" duct rod would be to make a small seesnake like the compact a better performer for 100ft sewer runs.
    Seattle Drain Service

  • #2
    Re: Duct Rodders

    i have a few of them, buthave never used them with my camera. i do use them with a locator or just to pull back cable for trenchless.

    although i used my 1/2'' one on a 6'' sewer main with adam a few months to fish my jetter backwards 150' from a c/o to a manhole and through the wye in a reverse direction.

    they are not cheap, and i'm not sure if i would strap it to my camera. you loose the feel of the camera rod.

    do you have a downstream manhole or c/o that you can access. you could try floating a pull string through the line and attaching it to the camera head to assist in pulling. assuming there is flow. also a jetter works good for fishing in lines.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Re: Duct Rodders

      does your 1/2" rod push out well? Does it feel too stiff or too flimsy? I also see myself using it to push big rocks and things downstream.
      Seattle Drain Service

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      • #4
        Re: Duct Rodders

        1/2'' will be too stiff for 4'' with 90's. remember that electrical 90's are much longer sweep than dwv.

        3/8'' is a better choice for 4'', but it too is a little flimsy for pushing rocks.

        a jetter might be a safer choice as long as you keep the camera at least a couple feet back. record and camera on the pull back.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #5
          Re: Duct Rodders

          when we use a string we put a ping pong ball on the end. rick is right about 90's. also put a few wraps of electrical tape on end of fish tape. it goes down easier and doesn't hang up as much if you need to pull back. happy fishing. breid..........

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          • #6
            Re: Duct Rodders

            when u use a jetter to help camera get down line how do you set that up do u attach jetter hose to camera rod or what and if so is camera head in front of or behind nozzle pretty new to jetters and cameras but long time experienced in cable machines have general 3055 and electric eel ej15oo jetters and seesnake color compact camera

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            • #7
              Re: Duct Rodders

              After I have snaked the line to get it to drain then the camera goes out for the inspection noting where the roots are, then the jetter gets ran out to those spots, the camera is sent in again to see the results, then the camera is pulled back 10 feet , I jet somemore then push the camera back up again to see results, and I repeat this at the bad joints till the line is clean. Some people keep the camera back 20 feet some 4 feet just matters how brave you are as the jetter will ruin the camera head.
              Seattle Drain Service

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