Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

    All:

    Some time ago, we had a discussion of duct rodders and what we use them for. I promised next time I had mine set up to push a SS Std. further than it would normally go (given the circumstances) I would post some images.

    Today, I needed to do that and I always keep a promise.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

    looks good. i have a few of the rodders and have used them to fish line to pull in reverse.

    how far did you get the camera without the rod?

    and with the rod?

    what size pipe and how many offsets?

    thanks,

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

      I think Vance does a lot of different things then plumbers do like sometimes he cant run water to make camera go farther so he uses the duct rod, is this right Vance? What size is that duct rod? And with that size can it push a seesnake 325ft in like a dry electrical conduit? Thanks VanceG
      Seattle Drain Service

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

        The very first year DeepSee was at the International Waste Hauler Show in Nashville, their first camera system was able to make multiple turns in 3" pipe and only 4" P-traps The camera itself was a decent size, but the push rod went up to 500' and it was twice as thick as the standard push rod we know today. It was a fiberglass pushrod molded with the standard video inspection pushrod. At that time they where asking over $12K for the system. I talked it over with my father explaining to him their system was built like a tank and is by far the best even though it was twice as much as any other system out there. The next year they where at the show the came out with the standard model we know and love for more than half the price. Just as tough as the first one just not as long of a push distance but negotiated tighter turns and a 3" P-trap.

        Now to the point of my post, I wish they bring back the very first push rod they made. I wish I bought that system when we had the chance.
        Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
        Ron's Facebook
        A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
        Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
        Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

          I would buy a 500' camera with a bigger push rod for the weird Inspection jobs I get that are not plumbing. Even though they have crawler cameras for that length the cost is huge! Plus the training.
          Seattle Drain Service

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

            Wow, this generated a lot of interest. Hope you all found something useful.

            A little background will answer some of your questions.

            This was my 2nd visit - the site is a truck repair garage. They had recently installed a "make your own biodiesel" setup and started having stoppage problems shortly after.

            Line is 6" VCP, going through 1 cleanout sweep + 4 45's to reach stoppage.

            Guys swore that NOTHING from the biodiesel setup goes down the drain.

            First time, I got 62' before getting stopped. The line is full of greasy crud about the consistency of lithium chassis grease. As you all know, when you get lots of grease on the lens, your are doomed as far as picture goes. But I could tell them where I was, and located a trapped out spot which they dug up and repaired. Packed solid with the mystery goo. I told them to call me when they were done so I could go further.

            2nd trip, the owner fesses up to me that they dumped a bunch of glycerin (NOT nitro kind, I know what you're thinking) from the biodiesel process down the drain. This is what's been making the goo, in concert with whatever other stuff they are putting down.

            This trip, I was able to get 122' with the doct rod attached. Last 10 ft. or so was solid goo again, so I couldn't see. But the line is headed directly for an underground electrical vault that had been installed during last couple of years. I have had many instances of the elec. co. trying to repair broken sewers themselves with PVC conduit, and other mickey-mouse stuff when they hit them during construction. We were about 20' short of the vault, but that last 20' could well be goo all the way. They're going to dig at the spot I stopped at and install cleanouts. Then have the line rootered / jetted as necessary to see if they get it cleared.

            As far as some of the other questions, there's no way to predict just how far you'll go set up like this. Pipe type, grade, how many turns, all that stuff affect how far. All I can say is you WILL go farther backed up with the rod than without it.

            The rod in my pix is my 300' 1/4" dia. I also have a 500' 3/8" when I really, really want to get where I need to go.

            The duct rod taped to the SS is the only way I have found to locate taps in 8 - 10" lines going UPHILL when you don't have any other point of entry.

            Rick, almost all the time the kind of electrical / commo stuff I'm doing only has one way in. They want me to find the other end. Qwest does not seem to document anything they do, and when they rough in a 4" for future optical cable, they just bury the other end out in the easement somewhere near an existing phone ped. When a tenant moves into the space, and wants big Internet bandwidth, Qwest throws up their hands and says it's the customer's responsibility to find the missing end so they can pull the fiber in. I have been able to fish muletape through only a couple of times so I could be pulled. Works good though when it's possible.

            Cuda, I've successfully spliced 2 200' Mini cables together to go 400' in a 1-1/4" commo innerduct. Couldn't push it tho', had to be pulled through. The local elec. utility says they have a SS custom mfg. for them with 500' of rod. When I asked Ridgid for this several years ago, I was turned down. Haven't revisited the issue.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Making a SS Std. go where it doesn't want to...

              Here are some pretty good prices on duct rodders right now.
              http://www.linemen-tools.com/GMP_s/28.htm
              If somebody wants to add a little push to there camera.
              Seattle Drain Service

              Comment

              Working...
              X