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Camera Skids

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  • #16
    Re: Camera Skids

    You have to add a filtering material to the lens if you add one to eliminate the glare.

    As for the scratches I get on the plastic that covers the led lights, buffing them out is just standard maintenance for me. Once I notice the picture getting dull I just buff it out and I am good for a while again. And to state that I bought it I take better care of my equipment is true and false. Yes I will maintain my stuff to get a long life out of it, but I do push it hard. I do stuff with my camera and drain machines that make other plumbers cringe at the thought. I will come up on some turns with my camera and I am not afraid to hammer it through. When I bought my system the guys at the booth where beating the camera head on the concrete floor which proved to me these can take a beating that you have to use to get these things down some lines.

    Another flaw as Rick said about the skid is it will put more drag on the camera making it more difficult to push into a sewer. Most my televising jobs require me to make multiple turns in 4" cast iron lines and get out at least 125'
    Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
    A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
    Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
    Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

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    • #17
      Re: Camera Skids

      I think the plastic balls are about as good as you can get in an all around helper to the system.

      Lightweight.
      Elevates.
      Doesn't catch much debris.

      Seem pricey for what they are though. I'd get me a whiffle ball and some duct tape in a heartbeat.


      J.C.

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      • #18
        Re: Camera Skids

        Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
        Just curious if anyone has considered putting computer screen protector on the lens?

        J.C.
        I think you mean the LED window...

        Don't think this would be possible - the LED window is a complex compound curve and getting anything to adhere to it that isn't "stretchy" (which the screen overlays aren't) won't work.

        One of you guys that have a scratched up camera LED window (mine aren't bad enuf right now), try this:

        Put it into a 20' piece of ABS, LEDS at full brightness. Cover the far end with a cloth or something (so light doesn't get in) and push a tape measure in until you can see the hook with the camera. If the tape measure hook is chrome (most are), cover it with black electrical tape so you don't get a reflection. Record distance. If you can see the tape hook 20' away, add another stick of ABS.

        Clean your LED window up really, really good with commercial degreaser. So all you have is scratches, not gunk-filled scratches.

        Put it in the pipe again, and do the tape measure thing.

        Then dip the camera head into water, and quickly (before the water evaporates) put it in the pipe, do the tape measure thing. If the water evaporates too fast (LEDS get warm), use some Vaseline on the LED window instead.

        Compare your distances and see if you've made a difference.

        Thinking: the water or Vaseline should minimize the reflective/refractive properties of the scratches (same as when you spit on your finger and rub it on a scratched-up water meter window you can't quite read) and increase the transmissivity of the surface of the LED window. And hopefully increase the brightness as well.

        If it makes a positive difference, we then need to find a clear coating for the LED window for a semi-permanent fix. Won't last forever, will get scraped and scratched just like the window did, but you can keep renewing it.

        I'm not sure what to use as a clear coat as I am not sure what the LED window is made of. I am tempted to suggest clear fingernail polish, but that has acetone in it. We don't want to make the problem worse. If the LED window is epoxy potting material (looks like it might be), obvious solution is another thin layer of clear epoxy (NOT the fast-curing kind) applied with finger.

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        • #19
          Re: Camera Skids

          They've been putting anti-scratch coating on old J.C.'s glasses for years.

          It does wear out though. Never timed how long it lasts.


          J.C.

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          • #20
            Re: Camera Skids

            Perfect. And they put it on acrylic (plastic) lenses too. That should work. Excellent suggestion...

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            • #21
              Re: Camera Skids

              I wonder if the scratch resistant clear coat they use on airplanes would work as well? I think its called Imron if I recall.
              Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
              A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
              Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
              Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

              Comment

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