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  • SeeSnake Durability in T- shaped connections and bad collars?

    I am looking at a buying the KD-200 SeeSnake. My question is that other manufactures have issues with the camera heads breaking and having to be repaired. Users, have you guys ran in to issues with reliablity, what are the costs involved with repair? Also, how hard is it to determine slope of the drain line, using the navitrack system? I would like to plot the slope on the sewer inspections to point out bellies or settled lines? It comes with the self leveling head and color monitor, any suggestions? Thanks all

  • #2
    “how hard is it to determine slope of the drain line, using the navitrack system?”

    The NaviTrack itself does not calculate the pitch in a line. That being said with a little creativity you can figure it out with the help of the NaviTrack. For example: Take a depth reading at point a, take another at point b, measure the distance between point a and b, pull out your high school geometry book and do the math (don’t ask me how, I forgot before I threw my hat into the air).

    “ It comes with the self leveling head and color monitor, any suggestions?”

    You can get the SeeSnake with or without self leveling. The self leveling is a nice feature. If you decide to go without, just remember the water is always at the bottom of the pipe and even if the line is dry there's typically a visible water mark.

    Peter

    [ 09-15-2005, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: Peter from S & D Equip HQ ]

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    • #3
      I understand using trigonometry to calculate the slope, but you would havre to pull off a transit or laser level. Becuase the ground is not level. This isn't a problem, it is just that when I got the system demoed, the guy saithe pipe is at 20%.

      I am looking at a system that has been used a few times, my question is how is the durability on the camera heads? How much for repairs? If the line breaks, how much to replace/repair the fiberglass push rod? Any info will help, thanks.

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      • #4
        Regarding the durability of the camera head and the push rod, my experience has been that they are quite durable. This is especially true when the person using the device is the same person who purchased it. When the owner operates the equipment they typically go for an extended period of time and even years without breakdowns. With the bigger companies that have a lot of techs the frequency of repairs is notably higher.

        When choosing a used SeeSnake keep the following in mind. If the pushrod is broken it cannot be spliced. It will be cut a bit before the break and the camera head gets reconnected at that point. As a result you must take note of the length of the push rod. If you loose 50 ft on a 200 ft long model the remaining 150 ft is probably still suitable for most applications. If you loose 50 ft from a 100 footer it is now questionable whether the unit long enough for basic use. You can purchase new pushrods but between the cost of the pushrod and installation the dollars begin to add up.

        To get an idea about the cost of potential repairs I would suggest you call Ridgid Tech Service 440-323-5581.

        Peter

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Outlaw-Techie:
          I am looking at a buying the KD-200 SeeSnake. My question is that other manufactures have issues with the camera heads breaking and having to be repaired. Users, have you guys ran in to issues with reliablity, what are the costs involved with repair? Also, how hard is it to determine slope of the drain line, using the navitrack system? I would like to plot the slope on the sewer inspections to point out bellies or settled lines? It comes with the self leveling head and color monitor, any suggestions? Thanks all
          I have been pleased with my KD-200 and have no real issues with it. As for plotting the slope of the drain it shouldn't matter much. When you find a belly in the line which is ponding do a locate and your done.

          The transmitter in the camera is not always in the same location within the pipe and as metioned earlier the ground elevetion is always changing. The SeeSnake will tell you where the ponding is and the Navitrack will locate the area and give you the depth.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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