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  • camera , locating & jetter equipment

    australian plumbing contractor.
    domestic,commercial,light industrial maintenance work from 11/2(40mm) to 6"(150mm) pipes work with 4"(100mm) sewer being the main pipe size
    we are the market for:-
    1/camera
    2/ locating equipment
    3/ tranmitter for buired cables. mainly copper water services
    4/ jetter pipe cleaning system
    We are reserching which is best suited to our business & have trialed several brands.
    Ridgid stands out as the most complete package and we are now eager for more information and advise on our final selection.
    Q.1 seasnake of mini seasnake plus ?
    Q.2 monitor which one?
    Q.3 navitrack or sr20 ?
    Q.4 transmitter which one?
    Q.5 reporting. we want to be able to provide our clients with professional written reports supported by cd visual.
    Q.6 jetter.
    Q.7 pricing in australian dollars. we have had some quotes locally but the difference between australian price and the american price after allowing for exchange rates does not add up. we are paying over the odds here.

  • #2
    If you can wait a few days for a very good review and some good advice from a contractor who specializes in snaking, locating and video taping the insides of buried pipes there is a fellow who posts here often and who is away on vacation at the moment.

    Plumber Rick is the fellows posting name and he is very knowledeable regarding this particular aspect of the plumbing and piping trades. His advice regarding this subject is worth reading.
    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

    Comment


    • #3
      monin bros pty ltd,

      I can only speak for the equipment I have.

      First for the sewer camera. I own a color mini seesnake plus. It is great for smaller pipes put I think beyond 4" would be a challenge. Even with 4" I often will have the camera turn around in the line at bends so I'm looking at my pushrod instead of down the sewer. I have used it in 6" lines but they were straight lines without any bends. For commercial/industrial I would go for a full size seesnake.

      Second on the list would be the monitor. I am currently using the ToolCase monitor and really like it. It is small and easy to carry yet self contained with a battery in case you are too far from a plug. If a plug is close by there is a cord to plug it in as well. With the design of the case it is super durable and still full of features.

      Third would be the locator. I have the Navitrack which seems to work real well. It is easy to use and extremely accurate. I believe the SR20 is meant more for utillity lines than plumbing. However they will both locate the sonde in the seesnake camera.

      Forth is the transmitter and I use the Navitrack transmitter with my Navitrack.

      Finally I have two jetters. One is a small electric Ridgid on a cart and the second one is the 3000 psig gas model. I have no major complaints about them except that again 4" is about the largest pipe you would want to clear. Above that you would want to go to a larger trailer mount unit.

      To give you an idea on cost, my dealer sells a Ridgid 90782 (mini seesnake and ToolCase monitor in color) for around $7,100 USD.

      As plumber stated earlier Rick will be back in a few days. I am sure Rick will have more information for you.

      Mark

      [ 11-13-2005, 04:28 AM: Message edited by: ToUtahNow ]
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        thanks for you input. will wait for more from plumber rick
        kind regards monbro

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ToUtahNow:
          monin bros pty ltd,

          I can only speak for the equipment I have.

          First for the sewer camera. I own a color mini seesnake plus. It is great for smaller pipes put I think beyond 4" would be a challenge. Even with 4" I often will have the camera turn around in the line at bends so I'm looking at my pushrod instead of down the sewer. I have used it in 6" lines but they were straight lines without any bends. For commercial/industrial I would go for a full size seesnake.

          Second on the list would be the monitor. I am currently using the ToolCase monitor and really like it. It is small and easy to carry yet self contained with a battery in case you are too far from a plug. If a plug is close by there is a cord to plug it in as well. With the design of the case it is super durable and still full of features.

          Third would be the locator. I have the Navitrack which seems to work real well. It is easy to use and extremely accurate. I believe the SR20 is meant more for utillity lines than plumbing. However they will both locate the sonde in the seesnake camera.

          Forth is the transmitter and I use the Navitrack transmitter with my Navitrack.

          Finally I have two jetters. One is a small electric Ridgid on a cart and the second one is the 3000 psig gas model. I have no major complaints about them except that again 4" is about the largest pipe you would want to clear. Above that you would want to go to a larger trailer mount unit.

          To give you an idea on cost, my dealer sells a Ridgid 90782 (mini seesnake and ToolCase monitor in color) for around $7,100 USD.

          As plumber stated earlier Rick will be back in a few days. I am sure Rick will have more information for you.

          Mark
          Dear Mark ,

          Is it possible to clean larger diameter drain pipe (i.e 8") with a 3000 psi ridgid equiped with 1/2" size hose + buze

          Regards
          Joel
          Mauritius Island

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks plumber and mark for the kind words. i didn't get a chance to review a weeks worth of post when i got back. so once again thanks.

            first if you can wait until febuary there is a trade show in nashville tenn. usa. this is a world class show that pools vendors and buyers from all over the world. it is hosted by the trade magazine "the cleaner". here you will find just about every camera co. in the business. some you never heard of. all will be there with their show special.
            i've tried many brands and own 8 cameras, 5 are seesnakes. in fact my very first camera i purchased from the original seesnake co. prior to ridgid. this co. still is making the seesnake under the ridgid brand.
            for a push type camera i would go with a ridgid. i prefer the color camera due to better white LED lighting. the black and white use red LED and tend to lose their brightness especially in black abs plastic piping. as mark stated the mini is good up to approx. 4'' pipe and the full size i've used up to 8'' with extra lighting attached to the camera head. the stiffness of the push cable is really what determines the max. distance you will push. the more changes of direction the less you'll push and the more wear and tear on the cable. i always use water to help with the friction. this also helps to spot low areas and top from bottom. also when you hit a tee, you can tell direction by flow. not too much water or you'll miss some of the pipe. i prefer the vhs type recorders. only 1 customer had asked for a dvd. i like the vhs as i can time stamp the recording to match the notes i write. there is a dual recording dvd/vhs machine that i might purchase in the future.
            as far as locators go. i own 7. 2 of them date back to the days of having to triangulate to get depth. now-a-days the locators do this automatically even without having to push a button. the newest locator i own is the ridgid "scout". this is a scaled down version of the navitrack. much smaller to transport in a work truck. it doesn't have all the features of the navitrack, but does do a great job in locating the camera. it will work also with the navitrack transmitter and locate live electrical lines too. you can't go wrong sticking with ridgid equipment. although it is worth the cost of attending the nashville trade show. the show specials will offset the cost of airfare and hotel. you might even spot a few elvis's.

            jetters. that's a whole other science. the smaller 1.5- 2 horsepower are limited to aprox. 1500 psi at 2.1gpm. if you raise the pressure, you'll drop off the gpm. gpm is more critical in the cleaning process than psi. the electric should be limited to 2'' pipe. i typically save the electric for indoor residential work. a gas powered jetter will be much more productive than electric. typically you can get up to approx. 5.6 gpm at 3500 psi. with a portable gas jetter. this is with a 18 h.p engine. i stop at 6'' pipe with this. 13 hp will get you 4 gpm at 3000 psi. 4'' pipe is all i recommend with these numbers. sure the jetter hose will pull into larger pipe, but are you actually cleaning the pipe properly and efficently? it's like asking a 3/8'' cable to clean a 4'' plugged sewer line. it might poke a hole in the stoppage, but it won't clean the pipe throughly.
            a trailer jetter will do a great job on 4'' and larger pipe. these carry their own water and have a much larger engine with higher flow rates and pressures from 2500- 4000psi. the flow in gpm is for cleaning and flushing of debris. the psi is for cutting. a good combination is critical.

            once again all of these can be seen at the nashville show. too bad they don't hold it in australia. i would plan to attend.

            rick.

            [ 11-25-2005, 11:35 AM: Message edited by: PLUMBER RICK ]

            Comment


            • #7
              thanks rick for your input.
              received another quote today for ridgid set up
              seasnake 200 colour self leveling cam $12,010.00
              colour tool box $7'000.00
              navi track $3,500.00
              navi transmitter $2'500.00
              induction clamp $750.00
              sub total $25760.00
              tax 10% $2570.00
              total australian dollars $28336.00
              approx total american dollars $20748.00
              how do these prices compare? seems high to me!!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                moninbro, those prices are very high. what is your import tax? it would be much cheaper to purchase the equiptment here and pay the duty. once again if you can wait till febuary you will get a better price and special offers at the nashville show.

                rick.

                Comment


                • #9
                  moninbro,

                  Rick's right again. Ridgid, color is the go & his other advice is great. (thanks Rick, I've picked up many tips from your posts)

                  As for oz conditions the Ridgid jetters are not the go. (sorry Mr Ridgid) We can't, within Cooee, compete with Ridgid electronic products, but the smaller jetters are easily made here & cheaper. Not Ridgid's fault but import costs kill the price.

                  5000psi, 21 Litre is becoming standard here. It can be mounted in many different arragements, & hidden, in the good old oz ute with XL type service body. The wheel mounted units can get knocked off if you stop at a pub for a couple of quick ones. Especially in our big cities. (All 3 of them) (trailer jetters are quite expensive here. Sorry Rick, but you wouldn't know that)

                  I've lost one van, 2 mth old jetter, 2 remote reels, eel, 3 locators, plus fully rigged out shelving, stock etc. $40k not inc. the van. Don't ever not be insured.

                  The mini Ridgid camera is a good 1st choice W/ a standard ridgid as a 2nd purchase later if/when you can afford it as Rick says it will go further. A remote transmitter attached to cleaning rods is a economic option for harder pushers.

                  The navitrack locator is probably the best bet for a 1st up purchase & the critical locates & then the scout (cheaper & smaller) for your future expansion . Once you have used them you will want more . Different types of cameras & locators give more versatility.

                  I prefer the full sized monitor so the customer can easily see the problems, your best sales technique. Some toolbox monitors have a tiny screen W/ a shroud which is going to be difficult to get a customer, esp. the lady of the house whose all made up & ready to go to work, to bend down, often near a messy trench, & shove their face into the shroud you just sweated on.

                  AS for prices, the line transmitter is spot on, you should get the clamp for $670 + GST, navitrack $2,950 + I don't know prices on color ridgids. Is that $12k for the camera & & $7k for the color monitor?? The US vs OZ prices never add up, less competition, tyranny of distance, remember!

                  Rick, wish we could pop in to that Nashville show like you guys.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    thanks ozplum for those kind words.

                    1 word of advise. you need to stay away from
                    kings cross when you're working. i was there in 1989,90 and it was a sight to see. good place to watch a bar brawl.

                    what is your common type of waste piping used indoors and outdoors?

                    we typically use no-hub cast iron, abs plastic (black), pvc plastic (white), and clay (outdoors only). is this true there too?

                    have you guys figured out how to make the toilets flush clockwise yet? [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                    rick

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "The Cross" sad but real. Nothing has changed, novelty entertainment for some, a life for others.

                      You talking "downunder", Downunder? Indoor/outdoor variation is minimal, it's more above ground/below ground material differences. I assume your indoor/outdoor variation is more in the north & east due to freezing???? & I thought you guys had the downunder fixation (can't find that smiley face)

                      Generally pre mid 70s clay, post mid 70s pvc downunder & c.i. now pvc above ground, W/ c.i. for larger commercial & industrial
                      "no hub" you mean no collar & lead/ferro?? eg. the newer s/s & rubber joiners.

                      Often the terminology varies enough that we may not always understand the terms used esp. the abbreviated ones. Eg. downunder we use ew, above we used to chalk the black stuff W/ lead (not the power lead) & I'm not gunna "lead" you astray.

                      Re. the flush, we are still working on that. Our greatest minds are up to their necks in it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        thanks, oz. glad to see you're working on the toilet issues. maybe if you guys drove on the right side of the road you won't get the truck broken into.

                        sounds like we use the same materials. no hub pipe and fittings came out in the late 60's. i understand that new york u.s.a. still does it the old way with lead and oakum. i guess the union has a strangle hold on the politicians.

                        are you guys working with the newer propress system yet? if you want a demo let me know. havn't been downunder since 1990.

                        rick.

                        [ 12-15-2005, 11:55 PM: Message edited by: PLUMBER RICK ]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I never drive on the wrong side of the road. At least not while I'm downunder. I did try to comprimise by driving down the middle of the road, but as you know, you can't keep everyone happy!

                          Oakum, that's a new one for me, & so is propress, not a terminology I've heard. How does it work? In fact, what is it?

                          Sounds like you need a holiday.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            how about wipping a lead joint with a hot glove.this is join a lead pipe and a brass ferrel togather . back in the 80s in new york i think you needed to do this to get your plumbing license.do not know if you still have to do this?
                            Charlie

                            My seek the peek fundraiser page
                            http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                            http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                            new work pictures 12/09
                            http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by moninbro
                              thanks rick for your input.
                              received another quote today for ridgid set up
                              seasnake 200 colour self leveling cam $12,010.00
                              colour tool box $7'000.00
                              navi track $3,500.00
                              navi transmitter $2'500.00
                              induction clamp $750.00
                              sub total $25760.00
                              tax 10% $2570.00
                              total australian dollars $28336.00
                              approx total american dollars $20748.00
                              how do these prices compare? seems high to me!!!!
                              Those prices do look a little on the high side even with the conversion rates. You can use our prices for a comparison with your local dealers. We do freight overseas but it can cost up to a few hundred dollars US in some cases.

                              Seasnake 200 color self leveling w/ color monitor VCR $9,151.12
                              navi track $2,195.60
                              navi transmitter $1,254.00
                              signal clamp $347.60

                              total $12,948.32

                              Hopefully that helps give you a better idea of where you should be.
                              Jay
                              Ohio Power Tool - Ridgid
                              Coptool - Power Tool Blog

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