Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
relocating Septic Tanks Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • relocating Septic Tanks

    OK, I'm not a plumber nor do I play one on TV, but I have this question. Can a septic drainfield and tank be moved? I live in coastal NC, perk ain't even a remote issue with the sand I have here. The contractor that built my house placed the septic tank 10' from the back wall of the house. Being on the end of a cul de sac, the front corners of my house are right on the setbacks, which means to expand the house it's either up, or back, hence the problem with the tank being 10' from the back. Is it cost effective to move the tank, or has some exotic septic design shrunk drainfields and tanks to something much smaller than the thing I have. Of note, the previous owner of the house planted a sweetgum 5' from a drain line. I always wondered why that thing grew so fast. Got the lines derooted and dumped 5 lbs of CuSO4 in the distribution box. That'll hold me until I get the chainsaw fixed. It really stunk (no pun intended) that I didn't find out about the tank in the back yard until I had closed on the house and a couple of months later wondered why the sewer bill hadn't come. Home inspector didn't even check the tank since the real estate listing indicated City sewer.
    Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

  • #2
    If Wilmington (Brunswick Co.) is like Goldsboro (Wayne Co.), you will require a permit and a certified company to do septic work. It will probably require a perc test first. Here, if sewer is available you are required to tie into it.
    That said, in my local area, the perc characteristics of the soil (sandy clay mainly) require an 80' line for each bedroom in the house. However, the 80' does not have to be in a straight line. My neighbor has small yard, and they allowed hime to "S" the lines (vertically) to get the 80' line measurement in a smaller overall linear length.
    Don't know if its state code or just county, (I think the county issues the permit and does the inspection) but I do know it won't be cheap!

    If it costs a bunch or you require sewer hook-up, you may have a claim against the real estate company, the previous owner, and maybe the city/county, because that should have been correctly identified on the property description and the city/county records.

    Good Luck!
    Go
    Practicing at practical wood working

    Comment


    • #3
      OK forgive me I'm retentive, New Hanover County. Soil here is pure sand. I am one of six houses in the subdivision not on sewer. I was told it was because my lot was platted before the sewer requirement, but I think it has to do with the invert of the sewer main at the end of the cul de sac being at minimum bury depth and my house being almost level with it. I know enough about plumbing that it must flow down hill or be pumped and pumps are expensive on tract homes. I have two 40' laterals for a 3 BR/2ba house. I Closest sewer is 300' away and as mentioned earlier elevationally challenged. Can the existing tank be picked up and moved assuming I still have room for the drain field with all the setbacks, or will it require the removal of the tank, installation of a new tank and drainfield. Also, will the rock beds and the old drain material be considered "hazardous waste" and have the associated disposal costs. I have to do a benefit to cost on this and see if I'm going to sink more in the house than the local market will bear. I understand there are newer septic technologies out there, saw a neat system on This Old House that used a couple of vertical plastic tanks and an interesting drain field configuration that used a lot less space than a conventional tank design. The house was built in '89 so I know some kind of major repair is in the near future.
      Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

      Comment


      • #4
        I can't help with those questions. Hopefully some of the experts on this forum can. I would have to call one of the local companies and see if they would give a free estimate. I know there are some above ground technologies out there, and depending on the set-up, you may be able to tie back in to the existing laterals after moving the tank.

        Sorry about stickin' you in the wrong county!

        Go
        Practicing at practical wood working

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Gofor, I'm still a bit jaded about the whole 6 houses in the subdiv with tanks vs. sewer.
          Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

          Comment

          Working...
          X