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  • Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

    I have a relatively young plumbing business and have been referring a lot of business for any stoppages larger than 3" to a local drain cleaner (I only have a Ridgid 3800 at this point). I am looking into buying a bigger machine and possibly even a jetter, as I like the idea of jetting versus cabling, although I will admit that I have never used a jetter. It seems like a jetter hose would be partially self-cleaning and any part that did need cleaned could be wiped down a lot easier than a cable. Having several small children myself, I am very conscious of biohazards when working on drain lines. After all, the hazards associated with sewage is the reason we have most plumbing codes. I always try to disinfect anything that we touch in the home like doorknobs, etc. I think customers appreciate that. Cable machines are dirty and messy. They often sling sludge and sometimes in your face! Understanding that cables are often necessary however, I am leaning toward a K-60 or similar (RT 66) due to their versatility and portability. The General Model 88 doesn't look too bad either (except maybe for rootops, but could probably be modified to take on or off the cart pretty easily), does anyone have experience with one?

    Also what are opinions on the best jetter for 4" lines and how well do jetters work on hard deposits in C.I. pipe? Anyone know of any good training programs for using jetter systems?

    I know a few plumbers who own jetters, but never hardly use them. It doesn't make sense to me. What is the downside of jetters (other than the stories like the using them too far upstream with fixture openings between the clog and point-of -access? Any advice or enlightenment would greatly be appreciated. I am a damn good plumber, but not nearly as experienced in drain cleaning as many of you at this forum. However with new work slowing down and the service sector being flooded with "out-of -work" plumbers, I am expecting to be doing more drain cleaning. I also hate the idea of referring some of my existing customers to the drain cleaner, as I suspect he also picks up plumbing work under-the-cuff.

  • #2
    Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

    Can't give any advice on jetting but go through the drain cleaning section and go back through the articles. Go through each one because sometimes we get sidetracked and the thread turns into a jetting information hotline. I have the k-3800 and K-60 and have used the 3800 maybe 2 or 3 times since acquirring the k-60. It's good for everything up to a 4" line, even heavy roots. The root66 is the equivalant and seems to be on paper, more versitale as it can also do the 5/16 and 3/8 drum like the k-50. A 88 is more for 3-10 lines, seriously heavy duty cleaner.

    The sectional cables are very easy to keep clean. I use regular WD40 on them and they stay very clean. If your biggest line is 4", then the k-60 is for you. If you're the only one using this machine then either a sectional or drum machine will be good. If your employees are using this, then stay away from a drum machine. $50 to replace 1 bad sectional cable or $3-400 for a drum cable.

    Lastly- Bought my k-60 from blackoftools.com for 1359 last year. If you buy now, ridgid will send you the 5/8 sectional cable kit free due to the spring fling promotion.
    Buy cheap, buy twice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

      ben, don't you own a general model 82 also

      what, are you going from red to orange

      the general #88 and older version #82 is similar to the electric eel. basically the same cable size as the ridgid k-1500, but the difference is that the k-1500 is a stationary machine and the general and eel is a rolling machine.

      as far as jetting. a good first machine that will do good up to 4'' is a 13h.p 4gpm @3000#. i would stay away from electric as this is a specialty machine limited to 2'' and smaller pipe. gpm is more important than psi.

      as ben said, take the time to read some old threads and then ask more questions as most q and a's are already posted

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

        I hold no loyalty to brands. I go with whatever I think is the best. Although the 82 wasn't my first choice, I couldn't pass it up due to the price. I might need it one day.
        Buy cheap, buy twice.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

          Originally posted by DPiper View Post
          I have a relatively young plumbing business and have been referring a lot of business for any stoppages larger than 3" to a local drain cleaner (I only have a Ridgid 3800 at this point). I am looking into buying a bigger machine and possibly even a jetter, as I like the idea of jetting versus cabling, although I will admit that I have never used a jetter. It seems like a jetter hose would be partially self-cleaning and any part that did need cleaned could be wiped down a lot easier than a cable. Having several small children myself, I am very conscious of biohazards when working on drain lines. After all, the hazards associated with sewage is the reason we have most plumbing codes. I always try to disinfect anything that we touch in the home like doorknobs, etc. I think customers appreciate that. Cable machines are dirty and messy. They often sling sludge and sometimes in your face! Understanding that cables are often necessary however, I am leaning toward a K-60 or similar (RT 66) due to their versatility and portability. The General Model 88 doesn't look too bad either (except maybe for rootops, but could probably be modified to take on or off the cart pretty easily), does anyone have experience with one?

          Also what are opinions on the best jetter for 4" lines and how well do jetters work on hard deposits in C.I. pipe? Anyone know of any good training programs for using jetter systems?

          I know a few plumbers who own jetters, but never hardly use them. It doesn't make sense to me. What is the downside of jetters (other than the stories like the using them too far upstream with fixture openings between the clog and point-of -access? Any advice or enlightenment would greatly be appreciated. I am a damn good plumber, but not nearly as experienced in drain cleaning as many of you at this forum. However with new work slowing down and the service sector being flooded with "out-of -work" plumbers, I am expecting to be doing more drain cleaning. I also hate the idea of referring some of my existing customers to the drain cleaner, as I suspect he also picks up plumbing work under-the-cuff.
          I know a few plumbes who have jetters to. Usually they have some rinky dink electric jetter that doesnt open anything. If your a plumber that does not do much drain cleaning, which it sounds like thats what your saying, then a nice jetter for you might be something from Water Cannon. You can pick up a decent gas powered jetter to the specs you want usually for under 2000. that will get you decent GPM, and decent PSI.

          If your worried about getting sick, getting dirty, running a jetter up an open drain, or stack...then maybe just sticking with a drain cleaner is best for you. Let him get dirty , let him worry about the mess. I strictly do drain cleaning and any work referred to me for drains by plumbers i use, that customer stays that plumbers customer. I would rather get the work from plumbers then steal that plumbers customers. I would rather keep getting work from that plumber then losing that plumber cause i stole 1 customer of his. Not worth it to me. Most drain cleaners will not steal the work of plumbers, if they are honest and respectible. But then if your using some drain cleaner who just does it on the side, then ya you will probably loss that customer. Just do your homework on who you use.

          I suggest you find someone local with a jetter and maybe ride with him on a jet job and get sort of a crash course. Hands on with a jetter is better then watching a video.

          As far as drain cleaning machines go. Ben and Rick nailed it.
          The History of Sanitary Sewers Good site on the history of sanitary sewers and cleaners

          www.thedrainsquad.net Our website

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

            Thanks to everyone for any and all advice.

            Will catch up on some reading. Read previous posts for many hours before posting, but got sidetracked for quite awhile with the Sylvan soap-opera, although it was quite entertaining I must say!

            There is a tremendous amount of valuable insight and knowledge on this forum. Wish I had discovered it years ago, but don't usually get the time to do this sort of thing (especially during ski season). I am also trying to make the move from my business running me to me running my business, which is tough for some of us, but should give me more time for activities such as this. I've never even taken the time to go to a plumbing convention, or read a trade magazine, although I love to learn and check out new products.

            If your worried about getting sick, getting dirty, running a jetter up an open drain, or stack...then maybe just sticking with a drain cleaner is best for you.
            Not that I'm afraid of cleaning drains, but why be careless, after all sewage is bacteria and WILL make you extremely sick. I know of other's who have been careless with it and ended up with hep. I believe in working as safe as reasonable possible whether I'm in an electric panel, using a saw, or playing in sewage. I do value mine and other's health and safety and do not see the sense in needlessly transferring bacteria all over someone's house. I would not want it done in my own home. I do appreciate your advice however, I just wanted to clarify my statement a little bit. Unlike Sylvan, I'm not going to be cleaning sewers as a hobby, but because I see it as a necessary part of my business, and have always been very capable of doing anything that I have to do. After all, I'll be honest with you, if I didn't have to work, I wouldn't work at all, as I don't get pleasure out of any of it, just income.


            "Live to learn, learn for life"

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

              I been clearing sewers with a km1500 sectional machines since 1976 and would say it would be the cleanest sewer machine around jetters are messy bastrads, but if you are cleaning sewers what do you expect, you are going to wear a suit no you are going to get **** on yourself no matter how carefull you are even when you have washed your hands and every thing else it will still be all over you and every thing you touch and as far as getting hep you should get to your doctor and be vacinated against it and have booster injections in the years to come to protect you and your family.

              Regards
              Tony

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?



                DON'T RUN OUT TO BUY ANYTHING RIGHT NOW,
                GO TO THE SEWER CLEANER EXPO. IN FEB.
                IN KENTUCKY,
                GO PUMPER.COM OR CLEANER.COM TO GET DETAILS,

                JERRYMAC MASTERPLUMBER & MASTER DRAINMAN

                P.S. YOU WILL SEE SOME OF OUR POSTERS
                THERE GOOD LUCK !
                JERRYMAC
                E-MAILJERRYMAC777@GMAIL.COM
                CALIF. LIC. PLBG,HEAT,DRAINS,ELECTRIC,WATER HEATER, BOILER, POOL AND SPA HEATER
                FIRE SPRINKLER CONTRACTOR,
                SINCE JAN. 1989

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?

                  [quote=JERRYMAC;117269]


                  GO PUMPER.COM OR CLEANER.COM TO GET DETAILS,
                  Thank you, looks like a great mag.

                  AFM Re: Cable And Jetter Choices Gw88?
                  I been clearing sewers with a km1500 sectional machines since 1976 and would say it would be the cleanest sewer machine around jetters are messy bastrads, but if you are cleaning sewers what do you expect, you are going to wear a suit no you are going to get **** on yourself no matter how carefull you are even when you have washed your hands and every thing else it will still be all over you and every thing you touch and as far as getting hep you should get to your doctor and be vacinated against it and have booster injections in the years to come to protect you and your family.

                  Regards
                  Tony

                  Thanks Tony, I do need the hep vac, which is one of the reasons I am so careful (although that's a contradiction in itself). I am not totally green at sewer cleaning, but by no means an expert, as many of you on this forum obviously are. I realize how messy it inherently is, however I do attempt to contain the mess to one area or to clean up the sh#@t that is transferred for the homeowner's sake, the vast majority of whom are not vaccinated of course. It may take a little more time, but I think it's worthwhile. The first plumber I worked for used to cable sewers wearing only Jersey gloves and would then wipe his hands on a dry rag, jump in his truck and go. I thought that was just plain stupid. I have used several types of machines including sectionals, drums, and even old push-tapes (which was about useless, but it wasn't my decision to make). I just don't have extensive experience and knowledge of many different makes and models of augers and no experience with jetting. I have always been curious also about how long bacteria and other microorganisms live on hard surfaces, such as doorknobs, etc. such as when transferred by a careless drain-cleaner. I have never seen much discussion or information available on this issue and just like to be well-educated about what I'm doing. The subject seems almost taboo among many in the plumbing business. I have never seen any other plumber attempt to "sanitize" his handprints on doorknobs, etc., but it just seems like common sense to me. Maybe it's because I remember hearing on the news when I was a kid about a big hep out-break at a local country club from a drain backing up in the kitchen of the clubhouse that wasn't cleaned up properly. I do appreciate your honest insight.

                  Comment

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