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  • drum or sectional?

    I'm just getting my feet wet, can anyone explain too me the difference between the two machines i guess the pros and cons?

  • #2
    Re: drum or sectional?

    please do a little search as there are pages upon pages of post on these machines.

    the sectional doesn't spin a drum of cable, it spins 7.5' - 15' sections of cable that you connect as you progress.

    look up a k-7500 and a k-1500 or k-60 and compare the units.

    there are way too many variables to answer at this time.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Re: drum or sectional?

      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
      please do a little search as there are pages upon pages of post on these machines.

      the sectional doesn't spin a drum of cable, it spins 7.5' - 15' sections of cable that you connect as you progress.

      look up a k-7500 and a k-1500 or k-60 and compare the units.

      there are way too many variables to answer at this time.

      rick.

      I agree. Do some research in the Drain Cleaning Discussion. This is actually getting old. We all know Drums are the best
      The History of Sanitary Sewers Good site on the history of sanitary sewers and cleaners

      www.thedrainsquad.net Our website

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      • #4
        Re: drum or sectional?

        O that tongue in the toilet is disgusting.

        Tony

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        • #5
          Re: drum or sectional?

          Originally posted by Drain Medic View Post
          I agree. Do some research in the Drain Cleaning Discussion. This is actually getting old. We all know Drums are the best
          greg, don't make me dig up your old post on your praise for the k-60 sectional

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: drum or sectional?

            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
            greg, don't make me dig up your old post on your praise for the k-60 sectional

            rick.

            Its good for roofs, but im still a drum man. By the way...Ill be bringing it to the roundup. I believe someone said if i didnt like it, that he (plumber rick) would buy it off me...good thing is its still almost brand new
            The History of Sanitary Sewers Good site on the history of sanitary sewers and cleaners

            www.thedrainsquad.net Our website

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: drum or sectional?

              Originally posted by loudog39 View Post
              I'm just getting my feet wet, can anyone explain too me the difference between the two machines i guess the pros and cons?
              It really depends on what you are looking for. I have been doing this stuff for almost 35-years and have owned a ton of each type of machine. What I have found is the set up time and snaking time on a standard drain cleaning is less with a drum machine. However, it is my opinion you do a better job with a sectional machine on a standard drain cleaning. Once you get beyond standard drain cleaning (limited access, roof, basement or whatever) the sectional machine wins hands down.

              A lot of guys like the ease of using the self feeding feature of some drain machines but I believe the only way to do a good job of cleaning the drain is to feel the cable as you clean.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: drum or sectional?

                Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                It really depends on what you are looking for. I have been doing this stuff for almost 35-years and have owned a ton of each type of machine. What I have found is the set up time and snaking time on a standard drain cleaning is less with a drum machine. However, it is my opinion you do a better job with a sectional machine on a standard drain cleaning. Once you get beyond standard drain cleaning (limited access, roof, basement or whatever) the sectional machine wins hands down.

                A lot of guys like the ease of using the self feeding feature of some drain machines but I believe the only way to do a good job of cleaning the drain is to feel the cable as you clean.

                Mark

                That sums up my opinion on the matter as well. Good post.
                Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

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                • #9
                  Re: drum or sectional?

                  I think someone is
                  http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

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                  • #10
                    Re: drum or sectional?

                    Here's the double edged sword to Mark's statement though, and I believe he'll agree with me:



                    If a drain, any drain became clogged to begin with, what prevents the second reoccurrence?

                    Something in that piping system (with the exception of soft matter clogs created by misuse) had created a prominent situation that started that entire process with the gradual collection of waste matter.


                    I'd love to see the true results between the two machines when a flush out is done with water after both types of machines perform the task, and inspection following. It's standard protocol to have the lines flushed immediately after cleaning, emptying the water heater of it's tempered water.

                    Flushing toilets and running every faucet in the structure.

                    Problem drains no matter if you bring them back to new condition in cleanliness, remember what brought you there to begin with.

                    So there's an important question to contend with; unless you're using a camera every single time you clear a drain, you have nothing to rely on other than water flowing without resistance.

                    IMO the attachment and the strength, deliverance of torque to the end of that cable to operate that attachment is the device that is clearing the obstruction, not the design of the cable that follows the head.

                    Of course, it's an added plus but cables have a tendency in smaller lines to follow a known path around fittings, lay at the bottom when they travel in long runs. If you have a cable that has numerous bends, it will scour the pipe as it travels, the same as the attachment is designed to do.


                    I'll be the first to admit; I do not miss the days when I ran my ridgid sectional and find out by surprise that I encountered roots. Having to disconnect all those cables inside a prim and proper home due to no cleanout, taking bags or extra tarps removing a leaking, smelly cable through a kitchen where people eat..........is pretty damn disgusting and time consuming figuring you're creating even another potentially harmful area where contamination is likely to be a danger zone for people in general.


                    No torching those roots off the open winds either; takes a chance of causing problems with the cable for down the road and most times it's not worth the gas burned. Get out a pocket knife when you hit heavy roots. I'd rather have it concentrated at the tip of the cable so that I don't have such a luxury of spending minutes cleaning my cables on site.

                    IOW, I like the hidden agenda the drum provides, that's why I switched years ago considering the benefits outweigh the given circumstances in across the board scenarios on an everyday basis. Attachment
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by DUNBAR PLUMBING; 04-10-2008, 01:51 PM.
                    Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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                    • #11
                      Re: drum or sectional?

                      Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post

                      I'd love to see the true results between the two machines when a flush out is done with water after both types of machines perform the task, and inspection following.
                      I've seen the comparision first hand and sectionals win hands down. I had a customer clean his 2" CI washing machine line from an outside c/o with a k380 that he bought from HD. Still backing up and I knew the line was the problem. He wanted an inspection and the amount of lint that remained in the line was amazing. Couldn't even inspect the line. I used a 4 blade cutter with the 5/8 cable and was amazed at the difference. No lint, clean good line with the sectional cable. This entire line was bad, not just one spot. The customer was running water the entire time and bent the end of his 3/8 cable behind the bulb auger. The customer did everything right, just the wrong machine. All he did was open the clog but never cleaned the line. If you have roots in one spot, drum machines are fine, when the entire line is bad, go with a sectional.
                      Buy cheap, buy twice.

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                      • #12
                        Re: drum or sectional?

                        Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                        I've seen the comparision first hand and sectionals win hands down. I had a customer clean his 2" CI washing machine line from an outside c/o with a k380 that he bought from HD. Still backing up and I knew the line was the problem. He wanted an inspection and the amount of lint that remained in the line was amazing. Couldn't even inspect the line. I used a 4 blade cutter with the 5/8 cable and was amazed at the difference. No lint, clean good line with the sectional cable. This entire line was bad, not just one spot. The customer was running water the entire time and bent the end of his 3/8 cable behind the bulb auger. The customer did everything right, just the wrong machine. All he did was open the clog but never cleaned the line. If you have roots in one spot, drum machines are fine, when the entire line is bad, go with a sectional.
                        The K380 doesnt have any power behind it. I wouldve used a Spartan 100. That wouldve done the same job as a 5/8 in less the time.
                        The History of Sanitary Sewers Good site on the history of sanitary sewers and cleaners

                        www.thedrainsquad.net Our website

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: drum or sectional?

                          We've been through this all before guys.
                          C'mon this argument has been done, and will never be resolved.
                          Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

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                          • #14
                            Re: drum or sectional?

                            no it wont
                            http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

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                            • #15
                              Re: drum or sectional?

                              will too
                              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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