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Getting to the root of the problem

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  • #16
    Re: Getting to the root of the problem

    If that was an ALASKA BROWN BEAR ,It would'a made boone and crockett !!!!!!!!!!
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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    • #17
      Re: Getting to the root of the problem

      What I find interesting here is most of us have pulled out large diameter roots and most of use have pulled out really long root balls made up of little fingerling roots but this root is a combination of both. Has the plumber who subbed the work to you figured out where the roots entered the system and is he making a repair?

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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      • #18
        Re: Getting to the root of the problem

        Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
        that's because a sectional is no match for a gorlitz drum
        I'm not too sure about that.
        My Gorlitz machines have served me well over the years, even though it's really the man, not the machine that does the job. You can hand a guy a top of line machine and its only going to perform as well as he is trained to use it. Drain cleaning, for the most part is a subjective experience. One mans bad experience is anothers piece of cake.


        Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
        once again when you have roots that are right at the opening, a drum can be dangerous. 200# of spinning drum will not stop when the blade bears down with only a foot of cable in the line.
        Anyone that has the drum spinning full speed with only 12" of cable in the line shouldn't be around ANY machine. That's just lack of training and or experience. You don't let it torque up to the point of dangerous situation only 12" out. That's no reason to not use a drum machine though. Anyone that's been running cable long enough knows this and knows how the cable is going to respond when it's torqued up. Both hands on the cable until it back spins to unload the torque or one hand on the cable to keep it from shooting out while the other hand hits the reverse switch. This is basic, 1st week novice stuff.
        On the other hand, I've been doing it long enough to know that if the cable torques or locks up so much that it won't let loose before I can stop the drum from spinning, I just assume let the cable snap in the drum before I let go. But that's hardcore, not the norm.

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        • #19
          Re: Getting to the root of the problem

          Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
          What I find interesting here is most of us have pulled out large diameter roots and most of use have pulled out really long root balls made up of little fingerling roots but this root is a combination of both. Has the plumber who subbed the work to you figured out where the roots entered the system and is he making a repair?

          Mark
          the line was cast iron bell and spigot(leaded) pipe. the pipe was split in a section and the ivy at the hill outside was the culprit.

          what amazes me is the amount of time that the maids room was not used.

          in fact there was kitchen sink waste/ noodles on the roots. so it grew all the way to the kitchen sink tee in the other room.

          all the exposed pipe is being changed to abs by them.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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