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Drum traps

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  • #16
    Re: Drum traps

    When they first came into service there was a need, due to having a larger amount of dirt and gunk. It was designed so the home owner could clean it monthly or bimonthly.

    from when the majority of people would take a job for a poor wage just to be able to pay bills. Even if that job was scrubbing floors, clean toilets, shoveling Sh!t or anything that would pay a wage.

    Today’s society wants it now for nothing. I am 34 years old and most of my friends think my job is sick, but everything I have is paid for by hard work not the bank, who owns everything and everyone who gives into temptation
    Sent From The StoolBus

    www.appletondrainandsewer.com

    Appleton WI, 54915
    1-920-284-7471

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    • #17
      Re: Drum traps

      When you get into the really old homes with clawfoot tubs and the like, you often find the trap cover flush with the floor. But as newer homes got basements finished, many of the traps were covered up completely. You can still find some that are poking down through the plaster with the plug on the bottom, which can be quite messy. It's tough to tell the owner of an older home that the only way you can clean the line is to rip up a wall or a floor to get to the trap . . .

      And when you get into crawl spaces, it's not unusual to find that the cap has long since rotted away, having been made of aluminum, and the tub has been draining down there.

      Many of the P-traps used with galvanized have a tight bend, and some were designed with a small plug on the bottom but you can't do much with it.

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      • #18
        Re: Drum traps

        Herk,in this neck of the woods we see all of the drum traps.In bsmt ceilings.Flush with floors.Lead.Some i'll take a poke at with the warning to he h.o.that if the trap is rotted or it's too much to get a cover off it will be more. (I really don't want to fix a bunch other stuff because I pounded the hell out of the drum trap lid and caused 4 leaks!)
        In an exposed basement ceiling I just quote them a price to cut that goofy thing out and put in a proper trap and then snake the line.
        Some do still go in new. Dental places that make false teeth and hair salons where they have removable strainers.These are not the drum traps of old and usually have easily removable lids and are installed where a person can get at them.

        Here was my drum trap post..This cover was a beauty!
        http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20627
        Last edited by Jay Mpls; 11-06-2008, 09:55 PM.

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        • #19
          Re: Drum traps

          I do a lot of drum trap replacement (with a P-trap). And I've seen some real doozies. I've seen lead traps with two or three inlets and a single outlet, and a lot of homemade designs in lead. Usually, the lead ones are at the end of their life, with holes or cracks. Same with lead toilet bends.

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          • #20
            Re: Drum traps

            YES both have a chance to cause big problems. I keep a heat gun and a small shop vac. for one, and my M 1 grand with my clip belt still full of 30-06 rounds and 2 jap. rifles picked up off the ground after the fellers who owned them didn't need them anymore, for the other.

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