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  • building a jetter

    i've been slowly converting a pressure washer to a jetter. i know there has been a lot of threads about this ill tell you what i have and if you guys can tell me what i need and where to get it from i'd like to just buy the rest from one place. i plan on putting this in a 14' uhaul box van i have i'd like to carry a tank with it and like to be able to do small lines and larger lines i'll use my cable machine for roots, i want to target commercial building with my setup. i have the pressure washer i was told it is 4000 p.s.i. and 4.5 gpm i just purchased 200' 3/8" sewer hose, 40' of 1/4" hose with spring leader on it. what else do i need and please be specific please.
    Mike
    Clark County Plumbing And Drain
    www.plumbinginclarkcounty.com

  • #2
    Re: building a jetter

    One of the most important things is to properly size the nozzle/tips you are going to use. You should flow and pressure test the machine at the end of the length of hose you are using. If you oversize the nozzle it will not pull it self through the pipe or clean effectively, under size will create back pressure to the machine causing possible damage or exercising the unloader valve which you should have. If you are looking for a small reel general makes one with a foot pedal on it.

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    • #3
      Re: building a jetter

      You can expect 170 PSI of pressure drop in 200' of 3/8" jetter hose.

      This means that a high-quality, custom machined sewer jetting nozzle (like those made at Aqua Mole and other US suppliers) with #5.1 or greater orifice size will work with your pressure washer. Expect to pay around $30 for this grade of 3/8" nozzle.

      We've found that many of the low-cost nozzles sold online (often stamped "CHN") can differ from their published orifice sizes by up to 45%. This means that you should specify a #8.0 or larger nozzle if you're buying a consumer-grade, fixed-style nozzle that costs around $10.

      This larger orifice size on the low-cost nozzle results in a cleaning pressure that's less than half of what you'll get with the precision, custom-machined nozzle. The custom-machined nozzle will clean better and pull through the drain with a noticeably stronger force.

      - Paul (pauld@cloghog.com)
      Last edited by PaulD; 10-31-2009, 06:34 AM. Reason: Removed home page link to avoid the appearance of SPAM

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      • #4
        Re: building a jetter

        spam!!!
        the only dumb question is the one that is not asked!

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        • #5
          Re: building a jetter

          Jerad, I should have mentioned that I'm in no way related to the nozzle supplier mentioned in my post. Don't work there, never have.

          As makers of sewer jetters we find that you get what you pay for in jetter nozzles. Our tests of unbranded, $10 nozzles from different suppliers show that these products can have such inconsistent orifices sizes that they have the potential to overload a pressure washer or pump.

          That's why we don't use cheap nozzles in our equipment. That's all I'm trying to say.

          - Paul (pauld@cloghog.com)

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          • #6
            Re: building a jetter

            Originally posted by PaulD View Post
            You can expect 170 PSI of pressure drop in 200' of 3/8" jetter hose.

            This means that a high-quality, custom machined sewer jetting nozzle (like those made at Aqua Mole and other US suppliers) with #5.1 or greater orifice size will work with your pressure washer. Expect to pay around $30 for this grade of 3/8" nozzle.

            We've found that many of the low-cost nozzles sold online (often stamped "CHN") can differ from their published orifice sizes by up to 45%. This means that you should specify a #8.0 or larger nozzle if you're buying a consumer-grade, fixed-style nozzle that costs around $10.

            This larger orifice size on the low-cost nozzle results in a cleaning pressure that's less than half of what you'll get with the precision, custom-machined nozzle. The custom-machined nozzle will clean better and pull through the drain with a noticeably stronger force.

            - Paul (pauld@cloghog.com)
            Welcome aboard Paul, You bring a lot to the table!
            Ridgid is a class Co. to not squabble ! Tanks Tool
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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