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  • K 60 process

    I recently bought a k 60 and very impressed. Cabled a line with 3 1/2 spiral cutter and pulled back or flushed all the roots in the line in one pass. Never have been able to start off with a big cutter with my drum machine and get those results. I camera'd the line before and after. Very impressed. The line was 4" and about 70' long and I cabled the line in half the time it would have with my drum machine.

    What is the process you k 60 guys are doing out there? How do you set up? Do you start with small cutter and work your way up or big cutter and work your way down?

  • #2
    Re: K 60 process

    Welcome to the forum.
    Glad to hear of your success.

    What made you decide on the K-60?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: K 60 process

      i swear i don't know "batson"

      there are pages of threads discussing the tips and tricks of the k-60.

      i always start off large. if i can't get through, then i size down.

      typical 4'' c/o i start off with either a 3.5'' spiral root saw or a 3'' x 4'' pear blade.

      if i encounter heavy roots, i'll remove them and re-run again to the city main.

      if it's just preventative, i'll concentrate at my marks from my prior documented track records.

      glad you like your k-60. so do i

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: K 60 process

        I also have a few questions about the K60. I currently use a Spartan drum machine, same machine for 9 years, same cable, no problems. All my cleanouts are in the basement, none outside. Lot's of basements finished, carptet etc.
        I would love to switch over to the K60 because of back problems and hauling the drum machine up and down stairs etc. but what about the mess? I would like to hear about some of your situations and how you operate in an area like described above? How do you keep from dripping dirty water all over the place etc.? I saw Ricks pictures from the other post and the cables are all over the place. In a finished basement or a basement with very little room next to the cleanout I don't see how the K60 would work. What am I missing? Thanks, seriously thinking of buying a K60.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: K 60 process

          I decided on a k 60 because of all the stairs and crawl spaces and no outside cleanouts. I have been running spartan 1065 and spartan 300 for about 3 years know and dont think I will be keeping them on my truck anymore. I am young but I still feel it pulling a drum machine up and down stairs all day. I still have some learning curve as far as speed and cleanliness but its worth not lugging that drum machine around.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: K 60 process

            Originally posted by ironranger View Post
            I also have a few questions about the K60. I currently use a Spartan drum machine, same machine for 9 years, same cable, no problems. All my cleanouts are in the basement, none outside. Lot's of basements finished, carptet etc.
            I would love to switch over to the K60 because of back problems and hauling the drum machine up and down stairs etc. but what about the mess? I would like to hear about some of your situations and how you operate in an area like described above? How do you keep from dripping dirty water all over the place etc.? I saw Ricks pictures from the other post and the cables are all over the place. In a finished basement or a basement with very little room next to the cleanout I don't see how the K60 would work. What am I missing? Thanks, seriously thinking of buying a K60.
            What you are missing is Rick is a bit of a slob when running his K-60 which is okay outside but I am sure inside he is more careful. The K-60 has a rear guide hose so the only part of the cable to worry about is the cable in your cage and the cable in front of the machine. I use a drop cloth runner to set my machine on. I then put the cage of cable on the drop cloth just behind the machine. If there is room I leave the guide hose laying straight out the back of the machine. If there is limited room I lay the guide hose in a "U" shape heading back to the machine. With over 20-years of having our shop I never spent a cent on cleaning up a mess from either a sectional or a drum machine.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: K 60 process

              Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
              What you are missing is Rick is a bit of a slob when running his K-60 which is okay outside but I am sure inside he is more careful. The K-60 has a rear guide hose so the only part of the cable to worry about is the cable in your cage and the cable in front of the machine. I use a drop cloth runner to set my machine on. I then put the cage of cable on the drop cloth just behind the machine. If there is room I leave the guide hose laying straight out the back of the machine. If there is limited room I lay the guide hose in a "U" shape heading back to the machine. With over 20-years of having our shop I never spent a cent on cleaning up a mess from either a sectional or a drum machine.

              Mark
              Thanks for the info! The drop cloth sounds like a good idea for sure, I currently use one even with the drum machine. When using your k60 do you run the cable straight from the cage and then back in the cage when coming out when working in a tight area, is it possible to do so? Also, I noticed that the cage holds 75', is that true? Most of my stoppages seem to occur between 75 and 100', so I would need two cages of cable I guess? Sorry if these questions are dumb but I've never used a sectional and have been doing this for 20 years already. Wow, time flies when you're having fun doesn't it?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: K 60 process

                Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                Thanks for the info! The drop cloth sounds like a good idea for sure, I currently use one even with the drum machine. When using your k60 do you run the cable straight from the cage and then back in the cage when coming out when working in a tight area, is it possible to do so? Also, I noticed that the cage holds 75', is that true? Most of my stoppages seem to occur between 75 and 100', so I would need two cages of cable I guess? Sorry if these questions are dumb but I've never used a sectional and have been doing this for 20 years already. Wow, time flies when you're having fun doesn't it?
                I have at least two cages of 7/8" but I don't really know for sure what the maximum amount is for the cage. When I am feeding the cable in I hand feed as much as I can without the machine. When I am retrieving the cable I pull as much out as I can without using the machine. Once I have cleared a mainline I will run water while I continue to cleaning the line. Often the cable rinses off enough where I can just pull the cable out and put it back in the cage without any mess at all.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: K 60 process

                  Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                  Thanks for the info! The drop cloth sounds like a good idea for sure, I currently use one even with the drum machine. When using your k60 do you run the cable straight from the cage and then back in the cage when coming out when working in a tight area, is it possible to do so? Also, I noticed that the cage holds 75', is that true? Most of my stoppages seem to occur between 75 and 100', so I would need two cages of cable I guess? Sorry if these questions are dumb but I've never used a sectional and have been doing this for 20 years already. Wow, time flies when you're having fun doesn't it?
                  No dumb question light going off here.
                  First thing Rick told me to do with my new k-60 package was to bump the standard 7/8X75' up to a buckfity by purchasing another
                  75 W/carrier.That and 8 sections of 7.5X5/8".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: K 60 process

                    a slob

                    33 years of snaking and i too haven't spent any money on cleaning up spills. and yes, i do get some jobs that i do inside with 7/8'' including white carpeted bathrooms. 5/8'' x 7.5' all the time and i use a 5 gallon bucket.

                    part of running a k-60 is knowing when you do and don't need to use a rear guide hose.

                    outside most of the time it's not necessary. the landscaping really dictates the need. if you're in ivy, or plants, then you'll need the hose to prevent from tangling all the cable and ripping out the plants. front lawns are typically no problem and neither are most driveways. without a guide hose, i can smoke a drum machine in speed

                    the cage is rated for 75', but i always hold 90'. much easier if you keep them connected.

                    the k-60 uses an open wind cable that spins 3 times faster than a drum. when you clear the drain and run water it washers the cable clean and spin dries it. a tight wound cable spinning at 1/3 the speed is coming back wetter and dirtier than the k-60.

                    so, knowing what you can and can't do is a key to mastering the guide hose. remember the guide hose is more than just for keeping things clean. it's a safety hose too

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: K 60 process

                      Thanks, learning more every minute! I watched a couple of Youtube videos on folks using the K60, wish there was more. I believe I understand how it operates etc. but I'm still a little concerned about having 15' of cable spinning behind me and on a finished floor. From what I'm understanding that's what the guide hose is for, to protect the surroundings? How long is the guide hose? Are the 7/8" cables 15'?
                      So to make sure I'm getting this straight, you remove one section of cable from the cage, running it through the guide hose. Run that section out, then remove another section from the cage and hook it onto the first section of cable and so on. Then when coming back you repeat in the reverse order.
                      A lot of times I'm in very tight cramped spaces, between a wash machine, stack etc., with not a lot of room to work. I'm curious how the K60 would work there. I'm looking at the positive and the negative here. The K60, very light, easy to carry in etc. vs breaking my back. The 300, very fast in and out without any messing with or touching cables.
                      I don't know. I think I should see if I can watch someone in action first. Hey Rick, why don't you make a video and post it showing how it's done? I bet it would help a lot of folks out with making this decision, thanks again.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: K 60 process

                        Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                        Thanks, learning more every minute! I watched a couple of Youtube videos on folks using the K60, wish there was more. I believe I understand how it operates etc. but I'm still a little concerned about having 15' of cable spinning behind me and on a finished floor. From what I'm understanding that's what the guide hose is for, to protect the surroundings? How long is the guide hose? Are the 7/8" cables 15'?
                        So to make sure I'm getting this straight, you remove one section of cable from the cage, running it through the guide hose. Run that section out, then remove another section from the cage and hook it onto the first section of cable and so on. Then when coming back you repeat in the reverse order.
                        A lot of times I'm in very tight cramped spaces, between a wash machine, stack etc., with not a lot of room to work. I'm curious how the K60 would work there. I'm looking at the positive and the negative here. The K60, very light, easy to carry in etc. vs breaking my back. The 300, very fast in and out without any messing with or touching cables.
                        I don't know. I think I should see if I can watch someone in action first. Hey Rick, why don't you make a video and post it showing how it's done? I bet it would help a lot of folks out with making this decision, thanks again.
                        Oh no! Now you've done it!

                        Send a PM to All Clear Sewer too. He can probably provide alot of help.

                        J.C.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: K 60 process

                          Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                          I don't know. I think I should see if I can watch someone in action first. Hey Rick, why don't you make a video and post it showing how it's done? I bet it would help a lot of folks out with making this decision, thanks again.
                          All you have to do is ask.....

                          http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17085

                          here's Ben in action with his modified cart design: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E82c9aYZsU0

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: K 60 process

                            I'm sure we all do it a little different but I feed the new cable from the front of the machine and down into the guide hose. After the cable is nice and neat inside the guide hose I connect it to the section which is already in the drain.

                            Mark
                            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: K 60 process

                              Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                              I'm sure we all do it a little different but I feed the new cable from the front of the machine and down into the guide hose. After the cable is nice and neat inside the guide hose I connect it to the section which is already in the drain.

                              Mark
                              Reason why I feed cable from the back of the guide hose is I'm like you where I feed the majority of my cable directly from the carrier into the pipe and I keep all my cables connected like Rick. For those who never used sectional before; this means the male end is coming out of the carrier first. If I want to add a cable using Mark's method, I would have to take 15' of exposed cable out of the carrier, disconnect cable from cable in carrier, then feed the female end into the machine, connect the cable in the machine to the one in the pipe and continue on. With my method(learned this way because I didn't know any better way) you only have about a foot of exposed cable at any given time. If you watch the k60 training video, you'll see it's unrealistic for typical inside work.

                              When I work outside, I'll feed straight from the carrier and just let 15' of cable flop out of the carrier and feed from there. My method would work a lot better if the the k60 was redisigned because there's a lip that the cable hits when feeding from the back end with the guide hose attached. That's why the cart has the guide hose floating in the back so I make my connection behind the machine.

                              I often get new customers and I have no idea what the condition of the pipe is so I start small to big. I typically use the 4 bladed cutter because it bounces over most offsets then follow up with a bigger cutter. Typically, I trip in about 2-3 times. If I know the pipe conditions already and what the stoppage is, I go big to small(cutter size). I also use a scratch awl instead of the unlocking pin, it works on 7/8 and 5/8 cable and is easier to hold with gloves on.

                              I can hold 105' in a ridgid carrier but it's packed in tight. If you get a general carrier, you can easily pack 120' feet in one carrier but it'll be heavy so this might negate the advantage of going sectional. I keep 2 carriers on my truck with 90' and 60' of regular cable and the 60' carrier has 2 sections of innercore cable for a total of 90' but you can definently tell the difference of weight with the innercore cable. I like to use the innercore cable as the first and last section in really tough stoppages. Rick explains why use it on the first section all the time so I won't go back over that but I use it on the last section because the last section has the most potential to kink up and you can really tell a difference in the transfer of power to the cables with that innercore cable. I also put pex on the handles to make them more comfortable. I put a picture of the finished product somewhere on the forum.
                              Last edited by gear junkie; 03-22-2009, 05:33 PM.
                              Buy cheap, buy twice.

                              Comment

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