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  • advice on equipment

    I am looking to get alot of drain cleaning equipment. I am experienced in working with cable drums , jetters, and simple hand augers( they suck) I am just wondering what everyone would recommend. I will mainly be doing kitchen sinks, bathroom sinks , residental and commerical water closets, urinals. etc. I just want to get an ideal of what brands I need to stay away from , and what brands I should look to purchase.
    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: advice on equipment

    Well if you get a K-39af and a K-60, you can do 95% of the work out there. Take some time and search the site, lots of good info and advice. Good people here that are willing to share info and help out.
    Last edited by Plumbducky; 07-17-2009, 09:44 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: advice on equipment

      Originally posted by Plumbducky View Post
      Well if you get a K-39af and a K-60, you can do 95% of the work out there. Take some time and search the site, lots of good info and advice. Good people here that are willing to share info and help out.
      thanks for the reply. I am wondering what makes the k-39 better than the other "drain drills"

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      • #4
        Re: advice on equipment

        What have you worked with in the past? For myself, I was taught on the K1500 and K50. Thats all I use.

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        • #5
          Re: advice on equipment

          Originally posted by NorthernIllinoisPlumber View Post
          What have you worked with in the past? For myself, I was taught on the K1500 and K50. Thats all I use.
          ridgid k-380 ,countless toilet augers. Ridgid k-750,tooo many handspinners,

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          • #6
            Re: advice on equipment

            I can't begin to count the number of times I've followed a guy with a cable who failed, jetted, and solved the problem. Use of a cable machine is a second choice I'm forced into by circumstance. A jetter is my tool of choice for most stoppages.
            This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

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            • #7
              Re: advice on equipment

              If you had to buy 2 brands of equipment based on the name, Ridgid and Spartan would be the two. Exception-Don't buy a ridgid toilet auger, get a general.
              Buy cheap, buy twice.

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              • #8
                Re: advice on equipment

                Originally posted by Ace Sewer View Post
                I can't begin to count the number of times I've followed a guy with a cable who failed, jetted, and solved the problem. Use of a cable machine is a second choice I'm forced into by circumstance. A jetter is my tool of choice for most stoppages.

                Hi ace.
                Since you do so much jetting can you tell me if you find any trouble using your jetter upstream of a residential blockage?
                Does your jet have trouble getting through with the line full?
                What combo do you use on 4" and 6" lines up to 150 ft with roots? Any advice welcome thanks a lot. oz

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                • #9
                  Re: advice on equipment

                  Gear Junkie,

                  Why a General Toilet Auger over a RIDGID? I am just looking for insight.

                  Renee
                  Renee

                  Product Manager

                  RIDGID Drain Cleaning

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                  • #10
                    Re: advice on equipment

                    Ben's working on his 40hr side job.
                    He'll be right back.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: advice on equipment

                      Originally posted by Renee View Post
                      Gear Junkie,

                      Why a General Toilet Auger over a RIDGID? I am just looking for insight.

                      Renee
                      Some of us find the general auger design easier to use than the ridgid design. I am one also. I tried a Ridgid auger for awhile, but went back to the general a couple years ago and never looked back.
                      Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

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                      • #12
                        Re: advice on equipment

                        renee, this has been the consensus for years with most of us.

                        even at the roundup it was discussed.

                        it seems like the cable is more forgiving in the general.

                        forget the drop head as it doesn't navigate a low flow toilet.

                        ben, your turn

                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

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                        • #13
                          Re: advice on equipment

                          The entire ridgid auger speaks of poor quality. Pick up a general and a ridgid side by side and the general is heavier and feels more robust. The general cable appears to be stronger. The handles on the general are bigger making them easier to grip. Extending the cable is easier on the general.

                          It feels that ridgid was targetting the DIY market when they designed this auger. Because it's sold at HD has no influence on that opinon.
                          Buy cheap, buy twice.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: advice on equipment

                            Originally posted by ozplumb View Post
                            Hi ace.
                            Since you do so much jetting can you tell me if you find any trouble using your jetter upstream of a residential blockage?
                            Does your jet have trouble getting through with the line full?
                            What combo do you use on 4" and 6" lines up to 150 ft with roots? Any advice welcome thanks a lot. oz
                            generally no, I don't have that problem (if I understand your question). The nozzle will move right through the water to the obstruction. The problem with jetting from an access upstream of the clog is always managing the water from your jetter so that you dont make a flood. The main thing is choosing the best access point; I always jet from below if I have the option. If I must jet from above I choose where to go in based on water management, convienience and cleanliness, proximity to where I believe the problem to be, how many bends I'll have to get through to get to it, etc.

                            I have a lot of little tricks for water management when I jet from above; arranging things so I can get the nozzle to the problem area quickly with less water added to the system, little pumps to throw the water outside, or set the tub stopper and pump it in there from the toilet flange as I jet and store it there until I pop the clog, or a wet vac used the same way. If I am lucky enough to have an exterior cleanout I'll make sure the top of it is lower than any floor drains in the house or cut it off lower if I need to and spill on the ground. water management issues and access issues (like it being up on the 4th floor of the building) are what drive me to the cable.

                            I run 5-6 gpm at up to 4000psi, but usually run at 2800psi or so. I rarely do anything larger than 4", but am confident I can turn out good work in most lines up to 8" with this setup and have opened 10" and 12", though I wouldn't say I cleaned them. For smaller lines, sinks and such, I use a 2gpm machine and spill into a bucket under the rough-in or catch my spill in a wet vac for floor sinks and such.

                            I lean towards the jetter as much as I do because it just does a better job on most things, and because where I live frozen lines are common in winter and since I can't cut ice with a cable I've had to develop the techniques to use the jetter.

                            for roots I use a button nozzle to get flow, then remove the rest with a 3/8 warthog, though I am excitedly awaiting the arrival of my root-ranger.
                            This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

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                            • #15
                              Re: advice on equipment

                              Ace.

                              You understood me.
                              I have a rootranger on the kj3000 ridgid jetter with 3/8th hose and am stepping down to 1/4 on a remote reel. I know that the flow/psi isnt enough for 4" lines with roots but it really does well for greasy 2" to 4".
                              I dont have the flow to push the rootranger enough so will be stepping up to a skid mounted 30lpm @ 3/4k psi unit on the truck.
                              Do you think i stick with the rootranger with 30lpm and 1/4"hose for 4" roots?
                              Thanks for the help. oz

                              ps: I know all this will have already been discussed in past threads but too lazy to look through. Cheers

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