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jetting roots in clay

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  • jetting roots in clay

    a job I did a while ago...though I'd post the vids in case anyone wants to see...

    It cleaned up nicely but needs to be dug anyway as the line cracked out badly in one area.

    Just putting it up to show what you can do... this is 4" clay, jetted with a 3/8" warthog at 5.5gpm.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYY3ZVvvTLc

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OlnlVJnXiI

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAssrCAy7tg
    This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

  • #2
    Re: jetting roots in clay

    Very nice videos . Thanks for sharing with us.
    Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
    A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
    Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
    Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: jetting roots in clay

      Great job alex , thats why you are the jetter king

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: jetting roots in clay

        How long did it take you to clear the roots.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: jetting roots in clay

          very nice alex

          do you video while jetting to assist in the placement of the camera on the bad spots?

          have you tried a rootranger and what were the results?

          thanks.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            Re: jetting roots in clay

            Thanks for sharing the videos, That was really good

            BTW - What set up are you using?

            Is that the RIDGID Seesnake?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: jetting roots in clay

              vid was made with a Ridgid color mini, tool case monitor, recorded on a cheap ($175) aiptek digital camcorder via rca outs on toolcase. The slight high pitched whine on the audio is feeback between camcorder and toolcase I've not yet found a way to get rid of.

              I think I made three passes with the warthog, maybe an hour, maybe 45 minutes with the setup time, not including camera time. Typically I'll do that and after the last pass leave the nozzle run out to the main, then camera again and see what I've missed and pull the nozzle right back to that spot. In this case it was good to go after three passes. I think the root masses had mostly grown inside the pipe and were only tenuously connected to the outside world. Usually I leave some behind in the bad spots and have to hit those again.

              I've not yet had a root job since I got the root ranger, but I did use it on a commercial laundry line that had backed up repeatedly. It had very hard scale or detergent deposits built up in fins at the tideline in the cast iron. The warthog was barely touching that stuff; mostly just cleaning it up. The root ranger needed some time to work on it but did take it off with some effort and some time spent with the camera pointing it at the problem areas. It's got amazing power (I'm almost afraid to leave it working too long in one spot; I think it'd eat a hole in pvc If I gave it long enough), but does require some care to orient it cover the whole pipe. I'm looking forward to vaporizing roots with it.

              Now if I could just combine the no brainer full coverage of the warthog with the power of the root ranger, that would be a truly awsome tool. But, honestly, when I look at what I'm doing now (with all of my wimpy 5 1/2 gpm) compared to 8 years ago when my go-to nozzle was the 'grenade' I was so happy with because I could spend only 20 minutes blanking off some jets and putting nozzles in the ones I wanted to get what I needed on a particular job, I'm blown away at the ease and effectiveness of these nozzles.
              This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: jetting roots in clay

                Ace, again great post, and the videos are very good. The high pitch noise is caused by a bad ground between your recorder and the monitor. Try a heavy duty RCA cable, sometimes its the simple stuff that causes the issues.


                I wish they market a root ranger for the bigger jetters. I know you can get them from down under, but they need to start selling them locally here as well. I was going to suggest that at the Roundup, but we only touched on the jetters during the open discussion for a little bit.

                Another thing I was going to suggest to them is a variable flow rate/psi jetter if they decide to get into a trailer jetter. It would be awesome to have a jetter that can give you the flow rates you need with a lower pressure, then when you need the pressure just flip a switch and now you have higher pressures with a lower flow rate to meet your needs on the job site.
                Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
                A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
                Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
                Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: jetting roots in clay

                  Thanks Ace, keep the vid's comming. What pressure are you running with the 5.5gpm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: jetting roots in clay

                    Ace,

                    Thanks for the long response and the videos!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: jetting roots in clay

                      Thanks for the tip Ron, I'll try that. I'm kid of restricted in cable options as the in on the aiptek is a mini plug and the cable that came with it has some doohicky in it that I assume does something good so a plain cable might not work, but I'll stop at radio shack and see. I think it actually is feedback as the aiptek speaker, though quiet, won't turn off when recording and the toolcase mic is so sensitive.

                      It gets less if I move the aiptek as far as possible from the toolcase, but that gets annoying as the aiptek has a couple bad habits and I can't watch for them then. It freaks out and quits recording when the cam goes under water and the picture gets murky, and I have to see it doing it and start it again. Also it sometimes inexplicably decides to split the image into two or three pieces of image and rearranges them wrong on the screen, like the left side of the vid on the right and right side on the left, and I have to shut it off and start over.

                      I think I'm going to try an Archos dvr.

                      Pressure is a funny thing. My pump is rated 4kpsi, I've had that one above that, up to around 5k, by accident a couple of times with no apparent damage. I used to run the warthog with .038 jets in the sides and would make about 3200 maxed out. I'd typically run 2500-2800 and step it up if I needed more for something. That setup would just wash roots, not cut them.

                      I've since switched to .035's and can now make 4300+, but running that high blows the seal in the nozzle out. For most things I still run around 2800. For roots I have to step up to 3200-3500, and the seal seems to tolerate that.

                      Re Ron's comments on variable flow; You kind of have that already with an unloader... but it makes heat to run it over relief (which is what an unloader is really; a variable pressure relief valve) all the time. But for a trailer jetter it'd be dumping back to a tank so probably be fine. Another option might be a device like the 'pulse' feature that cuts one or more of the pump pistons out by disabling their check valves cutting flow by a third or two thirds. Or you could just do what I do and throttle down until the rpms are such that the flow is what you want.
                      This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: jetting roots in clay

                        Great Video, that was awesome! I love the fact that you gave us the before and after on it plus the voice was worth the few feed back sounds.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: jetting roots in clay

                          Something I was impressed with was how you pushed a seesnake mini out to 100' in clay AND going through some heavy roots. I never would've had that luck.
                          Buy cheap, buy twice.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: jetting roots in clay

                            Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                            Something I was impressed with was how you pushed a seesnake mini out to 100' in clay AND going through some heavy roots. I never would've had that luck.
                            Ben,I saw that and didn't even consider the roots.
                            What gives Ace?
                            Was it the 3" cast keeping the push cable straighter?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: jetting roots in clay

                              yeah... i really do a lot with the mini... never had a full size as I've never really needed it, but I do seem to be able to do more with the mini than some others report...100' in 4" clay is no problem, might have to run water with it in some cases... I've pushed the whole 200' in 6" pvc with a good flow behind it.

                              Mine are old, have the black pushrod. I wonder if it changed stiffness when they went to red? Maybe mine are a little stiffer or something?
                              This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

                              Comment

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