Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Electric jetter question

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Electric jetter question

    i may have a need to jet some lines 3 and 4 inch so I've been told. In a place that will not allow gas operated equipment and jumper hoses from outside are out of the question. i've only used but have never owned gas jetters up to the huge vactor trucks. should only be food type waste. grease, fat that sort of stuff. what specs should I get. so far the it's looking like 1500psi at maybe 2 gallon per min. is what would be common and easy to get. Anybody have any luck with this set up in the food processing business?

  • #2
    Re: Electric jetter question

    2'' in plastic pipe, no problem. in cast or gal pipe, then it's always a chore.

    3'' plastic is iffy. problem with grease is it's a hard scale. unless you emulsify it, you will break off chunks and not properly wash it down.

    a 2hp. electric jetter is about 20 amps under load/ full pressure. most residential will have a tuff time keeping the 20 amp breaker running.

    a 5.5 or 6.5hp gas jetter is a much wiser choice than the electric.

    i have 2 electrics and a bunch of gas jetters. very rarely will i ever use my electric units.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Electric jetter question

      What's your max power supply? Maybe build your own jetter with a bigger electric motor?
      Buy cheap, buy twice.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Electric jetter question

        Is 220 volt available?? I know that Water Cannon markets a 220 volt rig. I am sorry, I dont remember exactly , I want to say it put out like 5gpm at 3000psi. It might be worth looking into.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Electric jetter question

          do you have 240v? if so www.pressurewashersdirect.com has 43. 20 4gpm or more. use washer with foot activated valve to jar around corners. plumber rick gets credit for that trick. breid............

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Electric jetter question

            I own a old Viking 2hp jetter that puts out 1.5 gpm at 1200 psi and I have done 1 1/2 iron pipe all the way up to 6" clay pipe with it. It works, but the bigger the pipe the more passes you will have to make to do a proper job.
            Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
            Ron's Facebook
            A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
            Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
            Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Electric jetter question

              Thanks all for the responses. I bet 220 would be available I would have to check. Rick mention gas jetters but that is not allowed. I would like to stick with 110 just so I could use it other places, but if I need a higher voltage I guess that is what I have to do.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Electric jetter question

                Originally posted by SewerRatz View Post
                I own a old Viking 2hp jetter that puts out 1.5 gpm at 1200 psi and I have done 1 1/2 iron pipe all the way up to 6" clay pipe with it. It works, but the bigger the pipe the more passes you will have to make to do a proper job.
                This is what I'm thinking. I don't think they care about the time it takes but they know augures arn't getting the results they want.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Electric jetter question

                  unless you have reverse cleanouts, the low flow is not going to flush out the waste and grease debris too easily. remember that a jetter pulls the debris back towards the entry point.

                  hard caked on grease needs to be dissolved if you plan on getting it to flow and not break off in strips.

                  prime example is the video that pipenightmare posted a couple months ago. she had a number of jettings done to attempt to clean her main. they kept entering from the toilet roof vent and going down stream. all they managed to do was drag all the debris back to them and never flushed it down stream.

                  i drove the 120 miles each way and jetted from a downstream cleanout with my 18h.p gas jetter (3500# 5.6 gpm) and had it spotless in under 10 minutes. video proved it. they were using a 50 h.p 4000# 18gpm unit not sure what volume they needed to dial it down too, but they did manage to give the bathroom a sludge bath

                  check with the plant you're planning on working in. i suggest you have them buy the unit as it will be used in their food processing plant. even the hoses should be theirs. 5 h.p. electric will be great. but the plant needs to have access to the power where you're working. '

                  talk to your contact and see if they're willing to purchase the specialty equipment. or you buy it with a signed contract that will guarantee you a payback. it will be uses less anywhere else without proper power.

                  a 2h.p. 120 volt unit is hit and miss at residential customers homes.

                  why no gas unit with a jumper hose? too far away? noise?

                  rick.
                  phoebe it is

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Electric jetter question

                    What about a propane powered jetter. They're rated for indoor use
                    Buy cheap, buy twice.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Electric jetter question

                      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                      unless you have reverse cleanouts, the low flow is not going to flush out the waste and grease debris too easily. remember that a jetter pulls the debris back towards the entry point.

                      hard caked on grease needs to be dissolved if you plan on getting it to flow and not break off in strips.

                      prime example is the video that pipenightmare posted a couple months ago. she had a number of jettings done to attempt to clean her main. they kept entering from the toilet roof vent and going down stream. all they managed to do was drag all the debris back to them and never flushed it down stream.

                      i drove the 120 miles each way and jetted from a downstream cleanout with my 18h.p gas jetter (3500# 5.6 gpm) and had it spotless in under 10 minutes. video proved it. they were using a 50 h.p 4000# 18gpm unit not sure what volume they needed to dial it down too, but they did manage to give the bathroom a sludge bath

                      check with the plant you're planning on working in. i suggest you have them buy the unit as it will be used in their food processing plant. even the hoses should be theirs. 5 h.p. electric will be great. but the plant needs to have access to the power where you're working. '

                      talk to your contact and see if they're willing to purchase the specialty equipment. or you buy it with a signed contract that will guarantee you a payback. it will be uses less anywhere else without proper power.

                      a 2h.p. 120 volt unit is hit and miss at residential customers homes.

                      why no gas unit with a jumper hose? too far away? noise?

                      rick.
                      It is way to far, different levels, and the biggest trouble is doors are not allowed to stay open. The trouble with them buying the machine is they have a group of plumbers contracted in full time so if they bought it the plumbers on site could use it. i like the idea of a contract that may work. I have made jetters out of pex with home made heads and have moved a lot of dirt with them. I know they won't cut grease though. of course there are no reverse C/O. although a big meat processor out here just replaced all there underground with stainless and they also put in rerverse c/o for jetting. I hope it will be code in time. Well you've got me thinking rick. I would hate to buy something I couldn't use in a restaurant greased up line.
                      Last edited by saysflushable; 07-04-2010, 12:07 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Electric jetter question

                        Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                        What about a propane powered jetter. They're rated for indoor use
                        You maybe on to something. I'll ask the powers that be about that.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Electric jetter question

                          http://www.jettersnorthwest.com/html...ne-fueled.html
                          Buy cheap, buy twice.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Electric jetter question

                            not knowing your layout in the plant. is it possible to invest in a set of pressure washer hoses that get run or permanently installed in an overhead chase or strapped onto existing piping. this way your jumper hoses are there for the future and all you do is connect to the drops. the end of it can be installed in an outdoor recessed box or left inside and poked through a core drilled hole when required.

                            i was asked about this by a friend of mine at a fish processing plant outside of denver. i refereed alex to them but it was too far of a drive

                            but i did suggest both the overhead hoses and a large in house electric unit.

                            i would think that regular maintenance of a large plant would be better handled by their own in house properly trained maintenance staff. maybe you can consult and train them for use in house.

                            rick.
                            phoebe it is

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Electric jetter question

                              My father has an old National Rodder that was the very first Cable Jet. This was out before the first electric or cart jetters. It used the same pump as the original Mustang jetters a twin piston pump. The pump is attached to the center shaft on the back of the drum so as the drum rotated, it gave 800 PSI @ 2 gpm. The jetter hose ran through the stainless steal cable and the nozzle also acted as the cutter retainer nut.

                              The system had two reservoirs, first one was your supply water which had a not to code bottom mount fill valve. The container holds about a half gallon, the second reservoir was your chemical injection. You can fill this with degreasing agents, or liquid copper sulfate.

                              We had an apartment complex that clogged monthly with normal cable cleanings. Once I got this machine we convinced them to let us do preventive maintenance every 6 months, the cutter broke through the blockage and the water cleaned and flushed the line. After a year and a half we went to doing PM every 12 months since we noticed the lines staying pretty clean.

                              Marco currently makes a cable jet machine, this might be a good option.
                              Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
                              Ron's Facebook
                              A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
                              Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
                              Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X