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  • #46
    Re: Is jetting worth it?

    Here is what I want to know..

    For those that use jetters without storage tanks, how do you get away with using the customers water? Yea we use their electric, but using their water seems to me that they would complain a little bit.

    Also we have some private wells here, what type of water pressure does a jetter need to operate properly? Plus, if I did have a jetter and used a private well as a source of water, if the well pump crapped out that day or there after, I would be to blame.

    Discuss...

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    • #47
      Re: Is jetting worth it?

      Water pressure is not the issue, you have to ensure you have enough GPM to run run the jetter. Also using the water to jet is no different than running the water while cabling a line. First thing my father taught me was you must have running water while you are rodding the sewers.
      Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
      A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
      Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
      Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

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      • #48
        Re: Is jetting worth it?

        water is cheap. cheaper than power. it's not like i'm asking to borrow the gas/ diesel from their car to power my jetter.

        legally i can't take water from a hydrant. the 1 time i did was because it was while cleaning drains at the fire department

        driving from my shop to the jobsite with 300 gallons / 2490# of water is foolish. lots of wear and tear on my truck and trailer brakes. all to save the customer less than $1.00 worth of water.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #49
          Re: Is jetting worth it?

          weak wells can be an issue, mostly about taking forever on a frozen line because I have to dial it way down. never killed one to my knowledge.
          This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

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          • #50
            Re: Is jetting worth it?

            When I think water supply is going to be an issue, I bring my septic truck with 300 gallons of fresh water on board.
            www.ClinkscalesSeptic.com

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            • #51
              Re: Is jetting worth it?

              Originally posted by DANE View Post
              Farm work is much work than any thing else. Yesterday we cleaned the water off the top of a reception pit at a large dairy. Its hard on hoses. Everything needs to be cleaned when your done. You use a ton of water. There are line 24 inches filled with beding sand no small jetter will work there.

              If you really want to do farm work I think a used jetter truck is the way to go. There cheaper than a trailer and put out the number you need for that type of work. We sub out anything bigger than ten inch. We still get our vac truck on those jobs to haul water.
              My wife's family comes from a dairy background in Wisconsin and our dairy industry in Idaho is a whole different concept. I've done excavation work for the dairies and seldom will we see lines bigger than 12". Also, most of the dairies bed with straw and if they have freestall barns they will bed those with composted manure, so we would not have the heavy sand accumulation in pipelines that you are used to. The one guy around here that does the majority of the dairy work uses a USJ 4018 with great success.

              I have looked at trucks, though. For the flow/pressure they are pretty reasonable, and we could do municipal work with those in combination with our vac truck. However, I have to size my equipment for the majority of my obvious work, and I think a large truck jet would be overkill for a lot of the work I plan to use it for (septic work, restaurant grease lines, industrial process pipes, etc.).

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              • #52
                Re: Is jetting worth it?

                Originally posted by SewerRat View Post
                I have looked at trucks, though. For the flow/pressure they are pretty reasonable, and we could do municipal work with those in combination with our vac truck. However, I have to size my equipment for the majority of my obvious work, and I think a large truck jet would be overkill for a lot of the work I plan to use it for (septic work, restaurant grease lines, industrial process pipes, etc.).
                Could a jetting truck be used for residential and light commercial, or is that just asinine?

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                • #53
                  Re: Is jetting worth it?

                  i bought my first jetter in may 2010.the reason why is that i was giving a so called friend anywhere between 8-15 jetting jobs a year over the last 4 years.what i found out was that he was going back to my restaurant customers and telling them that i went out of business.the first two he went to called me asap and told me.also on the very last jetting job i gave him he told the homeowner that the sewer was broken and needed to be dug up and repaired. now it might have needed to be, but he never told me or gave me my cut of the job.i found out 5 days after he did the job and told me that the dig was a secondary job and i wasnt entitled to any of the profit.that i was only getting paid for the jetting job.that was on Feb 3rd of 2010.so far i have done 9 jetting jobs sense may 10th of 2010.my little american jetter 25hp 8gpm 3500 psi with a warthog nozzle made me a believer in jetting...........rat

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                  • #54
                    Re: Is jetting worth it?

                    also i picked up 4 of his restaurant costumers as new clients......he is pissed at me and i dont give a rats @ss!!!!

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                    • #55
                      Re: Is jetting worth it?

                      Originally posted by SEWERRAT66 View Post
                      i bought my first jetter in may 2010.the reason why is that i was giving a so called friend anywhere between 8-15 jetting jobs a year over the last 4 years.what i found out was that he was going back to my restaurant customers and telling them that i went out of business.the first two he went to called me asap and told me.also on the very last jetting job i gave him he told the homeowner that the sewer was broken and needed to be dug up and repaired. now it might have needed to be, but he never told me or gave me my cut of the job.i found out 5 days after he did the job and told me that the dig was a secondary job and i wasnt entitled to any of the profit.that i was only getting paid for the jetting job.that was on Feb 3rd of 2010.so far i have done 9 jetting jobs sense may 10th of 2010.my little american jetter 25hp 8gpm 3500 psi with a warthog nozzle made me a believer in jetting...........rat
                      The guy I'm using now is very trustworthy and we have mutual respect for each other. However, whether he's working for me (jetting) or I'm working for him (pumping or excavating), whoever hired the other guy is there overseeing. Eliminates all misunderstandings about whose job it is.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Re: Is jetting worth it?

                        Originally posted by Flux View Post
                        Could a jetting truck be used for residential and light commercial, or is that just asinine?
                        As I said when I started this post, I'm not in the jetting business yet, so don't consider me an authority. However, I've observed quite a bit and done a TON of research. Here's my take on your question.

                        By far the most common, versatile, and popular trailer jet configuration is in the 16-18 GPM range at 3500-4000 PSI. These jets run a 1/2" hose for the most part. Truck jetters are usually quite a bit higher flow, such as 35-60 GPM at a lot lower pressure, say 2000-2500 PSI. This range is designed for bigger pipes with sediment, such as sand, and the extra flow helps flush the lines. The larger jets require a bigger hose, 3/4" to 1", to transport the flow without losing pressure in the hose. The larger hose would get hung up in elbows in 4" and probably even 6" pipes. The smaller the hose the better it navigates piping, which is why cart jetters with 1/4" or 3/8" hose are so popular with people who only do 4" or smaller pipes.

                        Another reason a huge jet wouldn't work well for residential work is that it takes pressure, not flow, to cut roots. I am told that at least 3500 and preferably 4000 PSI is required to effectively cut roots. Very few large truck jets have over 3000 PSI.

                        Again, I'm no authority here but in answer to your question that is why I would avoid a truck jetter at this point in my operation.

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                        • #57
                          Re: Is jetting worth it?

                          a 4000-18 gpm jetter, like my us jetter can be turned down in both psi and gpm.

                          i added an unloader valve to my machine and run my 3/8'', 1/4'' and 1/8'' hoses off of it as needed. have not blown a safety bust disk since i've installed the unloader.

                          3 weeks ago cleared a plugged 12'' storm drain that was 103' long. just got the check yesterday and i also used my 1/4 '' hose to clear a root and dirt plugged area drain line with the same machine.

                          yes, i could have used my 3500, 5.5 cart jetter for the 3'' line, but never for the 12''.

                          rick.
                          phoebe it is

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                          • #58
                            Re: Is jetting worth it?

                            Every unit has it place. I sure sound like a you need a 16gpm 4000psi. If you get it they will come. Jetting is like an arms race around here. The machines keep getting bigger. There is a 4000 gallon milk truck with a 80 at 2000 running around. Theres a trailer with 1000 gallons on it that he pulls with a 3600 gallon septic truck full of water too. I had a Harben that was a good unit too. I would stick with one engine and one pump if you go big.

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