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  • Septic In Cali

    La Tuna Canyon area is great place to visit.......but not to own a septic tank.
    http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_17765613
    Last edited by DanLawrence; 04-05-2011, 09:43 AM. Reason: validity

  • #2
    Re: Septic In Cali

    Originally posted by DanLawrence View Post
    California a great place to visit.......but not to own a septic tank.
    http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_17765613
    The truth is a lot of those private septic systems are older than both of us and often poorly maintained. La Tuna Canyon is an ecologically sensitive area and if they have high readings at the bottom of the wash someone is spilling sewage.

    Using LA City and County as an analogy is horrible. They both pay millions of dollars in fines every time they have a spill.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #3
      Re: Septic In Cali

      Its funny, milwaukee can overflow billions of gallons of sewage in the lake when it rains. Pumper spills more than 50 gallons, call DNR.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Septic In Cali

        Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
        The truth is a lot of those private septic systems are older than both of us and often poorly maintained. La Tuna Canyon is an ecologically sensitive area and if they have high readings at the bottom of the wash someone is spilling sewage.

        Using LA City and County as an analogy is horrible. They both pay millions of dollars in fines every time they have a spill.

        Mark

        Good point Mark, the wow to me was the cost to tie into the city sewer.
        I should have been more specific in the area and said La Tuna Canyon.


        If any high-risk septic tanks within 200 feet of a sewer line undergo catastrophic failure, homeowners must hook up to the sewer. The expected cost: from $20,000 to $100,000.

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        • #5
          Re: Septic In Cali

          i do work in mandaville canyon and i've only come across 1 septic tank.

          my understanding is, if the property is sold and is on septic, it must be connected to the city sewer before the close of escrow.

          i was doing a home in venice that last year connected to the city.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            Re: Septic In Cali

            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
            i do work in mandaville canyon and i've only come across 1 septic tank.

            my understanding is, if the property is sold and is on septic, it must be connected to the city sewer before the close of escrow.

            i was doing a home in venice that last year connected to the city.

            rick.

            Why can the cost to connect into the city be up to $100,000 it's beyond me why it would cost so much that is what i was shocked about.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Septic In Cali

              Originally posted by DanLawrence View Post
              Why can the cost to connect into the city be up to $100,000 it's beyond me why it would cost so much that is what i was shocked about.

              Do a Google Earth or Satellite of La Tuna Canyon. It is a very rustic area in the middle of a highly developed area with sewers few and far between. The cost is to bring a sewer main closer to the property. If everyone would pay to connect at the same time the cost would drop dramatically.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Septic In Cali

                Originally posted by DanLawrence View Post
                Why can the cost to connect into the city be up to $100,000 it's beyond me why it would cost so much that is what i was shocked about.
                Small lift station would be close. A Force main would do it too.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Septic In Cali

                  I can see both sides on this subject. I think a proper inspection of each system is in order. Requiring a permit to operate a residential septic system is rediculous in my opinion. Regular maintenance and monitoring are not a bad thing and could provide the answer to most of the people up there assuming the system is in proper working condition in the first place.
                  www.ClinkscalesSeptic.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Septic In Cali

                    Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                    Do a Google Earth or Satellite of La Tuna Canyon. It is a very rustic area in the middle of a highly developed area with sewers few and far between. The cost is to bring a sewer main closer to the property. If everyone would pay to connect at the same time the cost would drop dramatically.

                    Mark
                    I was wondering if it had anything to do with economic conditions that the state is going through if they are covering their costs with these large fees since they don't have tax money to cover their costs. It would make sense to come up with a resolution that would just get it done all at once so as you said their cost would be lower. I know that may be simplistic but I am sure it's much more difficult than that.

                    I did a google earth search as you suggested and I see what your saying. Those are some steep strait up and down hills / mountains. I know they are mountains but we have mole hills taller then that in Oregon...

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                    • #11
                      Re: Septic In Cali

                      Originally posted by Trent2 View Post
                      I can see both sides on this subject. I think a proper inspection of each system is in order. Requiring a permit to operate a residential septic system is rediculous in my opinion. Regular maintenance and monitoring are not a bad thing and could provide the answer to most of the people up there assuming the system is in proper working condition in the first place.

                      Each system here pays a 30 dollar a year fee to pay for the monitoring by the countys and the pumpers do the inspect work when they pump the system. Inspection paper get mailed today. Maybe this is why the state is broke.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Septic In Cali

                        Originally posted by DanLawrence View Post
                        ...I did a google earth search as you suggested and I see what your saying. Those are some steep strait up and down hills / mountains. ...
                        When you run a sewer main, can it descend as the terrain descends or must it not exceed a certain down-slope?
                        I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                        It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                        "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

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                        • #13
                          Re: Septic In Cali

                          Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                          When you run a sewer main, can it descend as the terrain descends or must it not exceed a certain down-slope?
                          I am not sure about all states but I know a lot of them are around .25" per foot for slope. You can install them at a larger grade per ft but it all depends on city and county but in Oregon we run into that a lot. There are a few methods we would use to try and cut the slope down some. The reason we would cut the grade down on hill sides and what not was that the water would run faster then the solids and so it wouldn't carry the solids down and could cause a backup. It depends on what the inspector wanted us to do but we would sometimes run the trench in a zig zag formation and if we installed the line strait down. We always installed extra clean outs just in case, even if they where not required. It's better to be safe then sorry!

                          one more thing septics are a whole new ballgame. Grade means alot and it really determines the kind of system you will have. If we had to install a septic on a hill side we would usually do something to the extent of a sandfilter system or a mound system, again that all depends on grade as well.
                          Last edited by DanLawrence; 04-07-2011, 03:53 PM.

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