Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sectional Challenge

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Sectional Challenge

    there was a very good video made a couple years back that features bill, and myself using a k-50 inside a semi commercial kitchen at joshes parents house. not only was it hot and humid there that night. but we were dressed in nice clothing since we did the job after dinner from the roundup.

    josh filmed it as we cleared the drain and even had cardboard on the tile floor so we could capture any water or sludge on tape. of course there was no water or sludge to speak of as we were careful not to get dirty.

    the trick is to clear the stoppage and run water to help flush the line and cables.

    if you don't clear the line, then there is going to be waste/ sludge and water on the cables. but when you do clear the line on the first try, which is 90% of the time, then you can easily control how much water is pulled back.

    a kitchen sink with a removed trap is not beneficial to running water. but it can still be done with an aereator adapter or flex hose shoved into the drain line.

    i didn't retire well over $20,000 worth of drum machines to prove a point. i retired them as i found out that a sectional machine does a better job, is easier to transport to and from the access point, and is much more universal. the days of wet and rusty drums and cables are gone.

    over the last few years, there have been lots of die hard drum user convert to sectionals. we all can't be wrong.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Sectional Challenge

      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
      there was a very good video made a couple years back that features bill, and myself using a k-50 inside a semi commercial kitchen at joshes parents house. not only was it hot and humid there that night. but we were dressed in nice clothing since we did the job after dinner from the roundup.

      josh filmed it as we cleared the drain and even had cardboard on the tile floor so we could capture any water or sludge on tape. of course there was no water or sludge to speak of as we were careful not to get dirty.

      the trick is to clear the stoppage and run water to help flush the line and cables.

      if you don't clear the line, then there is going to be waste/ sludge and water on the cables. but when you do clear the line on the first try, which is 90% of the time, then you can easily control how much water is pulled back.

      a kitchen sink with a removed trap is not beneficial to running water. but it can still be done with an aereator adapter or flex hose shoved into the drain line.

      i didn't retire well over $20,000 worth of drum machines to prove a point. i retired them as i found out that a sectional machine does a better job, is easier to transport to and from the access point, and is much more universal. the days of wet and rusty drums and cables are gone.

      over the last few years, there have been lots of die hard drum user convert to sectionals. we all can't be wrong.

      rick.
      I forgot, who was it that pushed you towards sectionals?

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Sectional Challenge

        mark, you can lead a person towards water, but you can't always get them to drink it.

        i dove in

        rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Sectional Challenge

          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
          there was a very good video made a couple years back that features bill, and myself using a k-50 inside a semi commercial kitchen at joshes parents house. not only was it hot and humid there that night. but we were dressed in nice clothing since we did the job after dinner from the roundup.

          josh filmed it as we cleared the drain and even had cardboard on the tile floor so we could capture any water or sludge on tape. of course there was no water or sludge to speak of as we were careful not to get dirty.


          the trick is to clear the stoppage and run water to help flush the line and cables.

          if you don't clear the line, then there is going to be waste/ sludge and water on the cables. but when you do clear the line on the first try, which is 90% of the time, then you can easily control how much water is pulled back.

          a kitchen sink with a removed trap is not beneficial to running water. but it can still be done with an aereator adapter or flex hose shoved into the drain line.

          i didn't retire well over $20,000 worth of drum machines to prove a point. i retired them as i found out that a sectional machine does a better job, is easier to transport to and from the access point, and is much more universal. the days of wet and rusty drums and cables are gone.

          over the last few years, there have been lots of die hard drum user convert to sectionals. we all can't be wrong.

          rick.
          YouTube - ‪Larz979's Channel‬‏

          Did Josh really call the K-50 a K-60?

          Mark
          Last edited by ToUtahNow; 07-09-2011, 12:18 AM.
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Sectional Challenge

            Ok...who's the guy that said.."Were going flat rate on this one". lol

            Rick was that YOU that said that? lol

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Sectional Challenge

              Originally posted by Flux View Post
              Ok...who's the guy that said.."Were going flat rate on this one". lol

              Rick was that YOU that said that? lol
              I believe that was Ben (gear junkie).

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Sectional Challenge

                I took a tip from Ron (SewerRatz) and started disconnecting the last cable in and then re-assembling the trap and running water from the sink to flush the line and the debris on the cable. This way I know if the line is clear (which is about 90% of the time on the first try in my experience which matches to Rick's) and if the line is clear then I get to pull back a nice clean cable. If it's not, then I can go right back to rodding at the spot that I left off at. When I'm done, I spin the cable on the way back and wipe it with a rag in my cable hand as I feed it back into the guide hose (I keep my cable pre-loaded into 3 guidehoses 2 X 21' and 1 X 15' all 3/4" liquidtite. The rag picks up the little water that has been retained by the open wound cable.

                Also, I have some long fleixible 3/8" supply tubes and assorted adapters that I can hook up to the faucet or hot-side shut off valve to run water into the drain opening while I am rodding. I always have a bucket to catch any water/debris under the drain opening. This is very effective for me as 99% of the kitchen drains I rod have a single opening that is 1-1/2" or 2" (in newer buildings) and usually no cleanout.



                The next time my wife abuses the garbage disposer I will make a video how I do it using the adapters to run water in the drain while rodding as well as leaving the cable in the drain and reassembling the trap, but I can't justify the time when on a job JC, sorry.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Sectional Challenge

                  Originally posted by saysflushable View Post
                  What is that black crap you only get from galvanized lines? Man is it aweful. Just like master said.

                  I bet If I built a contraption to have the water running when I pulled the cable back and could keep the cable spinning it might come out clean. Wet but clean.

                  That 5/8 open wind sure does hold the gunk.
                  Build a contraption you say? Two ideas just popped into my head. Thanks I'll work on it this weekend!
                  Ideal Plumbing

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Sectional Challenge

                    Swade plumbing is dead on!! I do the same thing! The most you have to woory about is the soap bubbles in the cable

                    try unpinning your drum cable,leaving it in the drain, reassembling the the trap and running hot soapy water! tell me how that goes

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Sectional Challenge

                      Originally posted by Swade Plumbing View Post
                      I took a tip from Ron (SewerRatz) and started disconnecting the last cable in and then re-assembling the trap and running water from the sink to flush the line and the debris on the cable. This way I know if the line is clear (which is about 90% of the time on the first try in my experience which matches to Rick's) and if the line is clear then I get to pull back a nice clean cable. If it's not, then I can go right back to rodding at the spot that I left off at. When I'm done, I spin the cable on the way back and wipe it with a rag in my cable hand as I feed it back into the guide hose (I keep my cable pre-loaded into 3 guidehoses 2 X 21' and 1 X 15' all 3/4" liquidtite. The rag picks up the little water that has been retained by the open wound cable.

                      Also, I have some long fleixible 3/8" supply tubes and assorted adapters that I can hook up to the faucet or hot-side shut off valve to run water into the drain opening while I am rodding. I always have a bucket to catch any water/debris under the drain opening. This is very effective for me as 99% of the kitchen drains I rod have a single opening that is 1-1/2" or 2" (in newer buildings) and usually no cleanout.



                      The next time my wife abuses the garbage disposer I will make a video how I do it using the adapters to run water in the drain while rodding as well as leaving the cable in the drain and reassembling the trap, but I can't justify the time when on a job JC, sorry.
                      This is why I like sectionals on kitchen sinks over drums. With a drum you don't know for sure if it's still stopped up until you've pulled all the cable and slop back into the drum and resassembled the wasteline to test. If it's still stopped up, you start the whole process over. With the sectional you arn't pulling a grease ladened cable back out only to shove it all the way back in, possibly creating splatter.

                      I've created stoppages from slow running drains by using a drum. That's what happens if you loosen enough grease without water running behind it. But if I had cleanouts and 1 story roofs to work from, a drum would be my choice.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Sectional Challenge

                        Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                        there was a very good video made a couple years back that features bill, and myself using a k-50 inside a semi commercial kitchen at joshes parents house. not only was it hot and humid there that night. but we were dressed in nice clothing since we did the job after dinner from the roundup.

                        josh filmed it as we cleared the drain and even had cardboard on the tile floor so we could capture any water or sludge on tape. of course there was no water or sludge to speak of as we were careful not to get dirty.

                        the trick is to clear the stoppage and run water to help flush the line and cables.

                        if you don't clear the line, then there is going to be waste/ sludge and water on the cables. but when you do clear the line on the first try, which is 90% of the time, then you can easily control how much water is pulled back.

                        a kitchen sink with a removed trap is not beneficial to running water. but it can still be done with an aereator adapter or flex hose shoved into the drain line.

                        i didn't retire well over $20,000 worth of drum machines to prove a point. i retired them as i found out that a sectional machine does a better job, is easier to transport to and from the access point, and is much more universal. the days of wet and rusty drums and cables are gone.

                        over the last few years, there have been lots of die hard drum user convert to sectionals. we all can't be wrong.

                        rick.
                        I've seen the video. Two men on a PVC line.

                        Now for the challenge again:

                        I challenge anyone using a sectional machine to clean a GALVANIZED kitchen sink line and bring the cables back "clean and spun dry" and make a video of it.

                        Preferably white cabinets and one person.

                        Waiting.....Watching.....


                        J.C.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Sectional Challenge

                          Originally posted by idlplumb View Post
                          Build a contraption you say? Two ideas just popped into my head. Thanks I'll work on it this weekend!
                          I made one using a washing machine hose connected with a brass nipple to a ball valve. on the other side of the ball valve was an adapter to go to 1/4" compression and about 3' of 1/4" copper tubing. I would hook the dishwasher hose up to faucet with an aerator-hose adapter or by disconnecting the hot water supply tube at the stop and using adapters to hook up to the 3/8" comp. I still have it have it around somewhere but I've found that using a long 3/8" flexi hooked up to the stop is usually easier (unless the supply lines are 3/8" or worse yey 1/2" OD copper lines, then I use adapters on the faucet).

                          I don't have the luxury of rodding kitchen sink lines from a roof (all homes are 2 stories or steep pitch) or from outside (sometimes it's the underground to the catch basin is stopped up.....rarely) so I have to do this rather frequently.

                          The trouble is that a lot of times galvanized lines are flat with no pitch or are slightly backpitched, so you may get water coming back at you unless you can jam the tube/hose far enough into the pipe (and still be able to run the rod with it in the pipe). You definitely need a bucket around to catch the water

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Sectional Challenge

                            I've made different contraptions. None I've stuck with. What often happens to me is that I need part of the contraption to complete the next job and forget to re-make it.

                            Gear Junkie had one he showed awhile back that might be handy. Basically a piece of PVC with a Fernco on one end that would connect to the stubout/trap adapter. A 90 or 45 on the other end. (Can't remember). Long enough that it sticks out of the cabinet. Then bungied up around the faucet to hold it in place. Connect an aerator hose to the faucet and voila'!

                            You can stand, clear the drain, and clean the cable.

                            Have to try it and remember to not use the parts from it.


                            J.C.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Sectional Challenge

                              Let me think of what could be worse than snaking a drain from inside the sink cabinet......

                              Got it!...snaking from a wall cabinet!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Sectional Challenge

                                Originally posted by TheMaster
                                Do this with a sectional. Notice Chico is busy making a video while his machine cleans the drain. lol 59.95

                                Those low ballers are just bait and switchers. Come on look at the cutting head on that snake
                                Rod
                                MT. Washington Sewer & Drain Cleaning
                                Serving Berlin, NH and North Conway, NH areas
                                http://unclognh.com
                                http://mtwashingtonseweranddrainclea...m/default.aspx

                                Charging less does not mean more call volume it just means you have to work harder to reach your goals.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X