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Grease build ups on new home sewers ?

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  • #31
    Re: Grease build ups on new home sewers ?

    Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
    Stolen, Depends on your state, here in Missouri there is no state licensing and individual municipalities can set their own code. so the city my house is in can require it, and there really isn't much to be done about it, short of trying to change the city ordinance.

    Ratz, except for the places that require the whole house to be on a backwater valve "like my house," when we install one the upstairs isn't affected by it, the valve gets tied into the sewer between the affected fixtures and the service, so you can still gravity flush the upstairs piping "as long as water can escape the manhole" when the backwater valve is forced closed.
    Could the homeowner remove it? Around here I understand the homeowner can do anything to their house without being a licensed plumber, and doesn't have to get inspections for it either..

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    • #32
      Re: Grease build ups on new home sewers ?

      They certainly could.

      Originally posted by stolen View Post
      Could the homeowner remove it? Around here I understand the homeowner can do anything to their house without being a licensed plumber, and doesn't have to get inspections for it either..
      No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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      • #33
        Re: Grease build ups on new home sewers ?

        Sounds like a root saw would fix things ! Shoot,shovel, and shut up !
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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        • #34
          Re: Grease build ups on new home sewers ?

          Originally posted by Vern View Post
          Where I live on the NW side of the city, the past few heavy rains flooded the street, it was over the curb. Wouldn't a valve w/ a pump be better in this situation? The last time this happened my first floor toilet wouldn't flush.

          Hi there Vern,

          There are parts of Chicago where the first floor is a little lower than thestreet itself, so yes a valve with a pump would be the solution in that case.The Tramco 960 would be a perfect solution for homes in that type of situation.The first time seen something like that was 20 years ago. I got a call for ablocked sewer. I get there and run the rod in the line and the rod flew throughwithout any obstruction and the line was still plugged. So my helper ran therod while I went to go listen in the city sewer to see if I could hear my cablebanging around (to see if I was dealing with a sludge blockage), and as Iopened the manhole it was full to the top just about a half inch below the lid. I wasshocked since the house was on a slab no basement. But he was the lowest pointin the block so it caused him a backup. City came out jetted the main and hisproblem went away. We did install him a flood control since that blocked hadcity blockages on a regular basis.

          In most cases in the city and the suburbs an overhead sewer is the best solutionto prevent city sewer backups. Sincemost first floors are higher than the street. That is why I like to look a job over and then suggest the best solution for the building. Then give them prices for each option.
          Last edited by SewerRatz; 09-10-2011, 06:44 PM. Reason: typo
          Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
          A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
          Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
          Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

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