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Gravel in Sewer Drain Pipe

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  • #16
    Re: Gravel in Sewer Drain Pipe

    Hi Cuda (and others),

    Have got a permaliner contractor who apparently has a "pull in place system" who will be looking at my pipe tomorrow. Says that the tip of his "snake" [my term] can move stones forward or backward and didn't mention that he had any problems with the cleanout. (Did mention that he invested $350,000 in the system, so I am assuming that he has the "pull in place.") Are there any particular things I should be aware of before I agree to use this system and contractor?

    Thanks again to everyone,

    JD

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    • #17
      Re: Gravel in Sewer Drain Pipe

      only thing as the client I can think of are.
      1. After all lining or patching that is done that no other connections have been blocked off by the lining process.
      2. Lining is done to local codes, some places have no codes others may want a DVD of the completed job. To make sure it does not protrude into the city sewer.
      Seattle Drain Service

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      • #18
        Re: Gravel in Sewer Drain Pipe

        jetting is a good idea. You may try forcing a 2 inch vacuum truck hose down your 4 inch cleanout and sucking the gravel out. easier to do when someone is fixing the hole

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        • #19
          Re: Gravel in Sewer Drain Pipe

          Signed a contract for $3850 for 20 feet of permaliner and cleaning out the gravel. Will let forum members know how it goes.

          JD

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          • #20
            Re: Gravel in Sewer Drain Pipe

            The permaliner contractor came today and things did not go well. They didn't bring their 4,000 psi jetter (truck broke down yesterday) and instead tried to use a 2,000 psi jetter. The actual people doing the work seemed to be working hard, but I wonder whether they had the tools for the job. In any event, after about 4-5 hours of trying to jet and suck the gravel out of the pipe, they gave up and said that the suction was just bringing in new gravel and that the only solution was to dig 15 feet deep and put in 30 feet of pipe. [my house is on top of a decent sized knoll. The pipe from my basement foundation could be 15 feet deep, but it is something I would like to be sure about.] One complication is that the hole in the pipe (as seen by video) is about 1 foot from the basement foundation and is under a concrete porch.

            Now the permaliner contractor is saying that I need a substantial dig to put 25-30 feet of pvc pipe in. The cost of the proposed fix is about $9,800 and doesn't include "concrete repair." I would like to better understand why the hole near my foundation can't be fixed and why the gravel (it typically is about the size of a quarter -- it is much bigger than pea gravel) can't be jetted out after the hole near the foundation is patched either temporarily or premanently. Also, general suggestions as to what to do in this situation. Would add that I paid half of $3,850 upfront [they want an additional $7,700] and that I now have a hole to the basement pipe already dug out, which should aid a new contractor if one is needed. Thanks for any help that can be given.

            JD

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            • #21
              Am wondering what Dailey7 ended up doing?

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              • #22
                The LMK vac a tee is an interesting idea. The vacum truck might be a bit much.
                Breaking Ground Without Breaking Any Ground. Home of the Performance Liner.

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                • #23
                  Sorry for throwing my two-bob into this one. Have a few questions which I cant understand. Rock, bigger than 1/4" minus(i trust that is what you guys use for bedding). How much bigger is the rock. What is the orientation of the hole/break in the main. 15' dig, mmmmm that will definitely need shoring nor to mention engineers opinion. Can you stop using this pipe to allow for the area to dry out. Bigger problem is how much undermining has taken place already.
                  Me personally having been in this forum for some time now if i was in your position I would spring for an air-fair and get one of these guys in the assess and advise. They are all pros here and have reputations that are precious to them all. Just the 15' excavation comment would lead me to say you are mad if you dont think seriously about this suggestion. It will give you peace of mind, and it will also protect you from liability if you flip the house in 6-12 mths. The longer you procrastinate the worse it can get. I wojld also definitely be consulting an Engineer who is also a PRO. Get the truth and deal with it. Undermining creates bigger issues. Just my HUMBLE OPINION though......!!!! (Laugh:- Rick, you may get to rack up some frequent flyer points to cash in for the ROUND-UP DOWNUNDER if Joe ever wises up to how good it would be....!!!!)

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