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  • Jetting question

    I don't know how to start a poll on here, so I'll just ask...

    Those that do jetting, are you self taught, or did you learn being an employee somewhere else, or some other answer?

    I'm just curious how my peers got started in jetting.

  • #2
    Re: Jetting question

    I learned the way most people do it, on the job training. I jetted alot for a Sewer and Drain Cleaning company I used to work for. I was taught some things, the other I learned and figured out on my own.
    Will Rogers Plumbing
    Moore, Oklahoma
    (
    405) 323-2852

    "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

    "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



    www.willrogersplumbing.com
    http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

    "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Jetting question

      self taught. built my first jetter close to 20 years ago from a 2hp electric pressure washer i still have and use. then moved up to a 5.5 hp gas unit. then 11 hp, 18hp 24 hp and now 50 hp. with several versions in between. lots of reading and trade shows.

      i did take a us jetting class last year to learn a little about the maintenance and marketing. plus the donuts weren't bad

      nozzle choice and hose choice are the single most important items to get right. especially with smaller capacity jetters.

      a word of advice. don't smile while jetting overhead drains while in the line of fire. unless you want to loose 20#

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Jetting question

        I understand Plumbing design extremely well, and I'm pretty good with designing Residential Plumbing systems.

        But I'm gun shy on the whole jetter thing for some reason. I'm not the type to get a new tool that I've never used, and wake up the next day calling myself a Professional and hiring out for it. I think when I get settled into my house, I'm going to get a jetter and practice on my house (PVC sewer), and also my dad's sewer (C.I.)

        I don't think anyone around here offers any type of classes on jetting either.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Jetting question

          This might help you... the Aussie way. You might have to turn your screen upside down to watch it!

          Jetters Edge Training Videos
          Regards, Bill

          The definition of Insanity: "Doing the same thing over and over expecting a different result."
          Albert Einstein

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Jetting question

            Jetting is not a lot different than snaking a drain with a cable. If you got experience with a snake, then the transition into jetting will not be too hard to do. If you have no drain cleaning experience at all, then I'd recommend you start cleaning kitchen sink drains, washing machines, tubs, etc with a cable machine first before getting into jetting hardcore. Learn the basics first before getting into the advanced stuff.

            Also to second what Rick said, reading up and research is key. I researched for about a year before I built my first custom jetter last year.
            Will Rogers Plumbing
            Moore, Oklahoma
            (
            405) 323-2852

            "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

            "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



            www.willrogersplumbing.com
            http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

            "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Jetting question

              Originally posted by Will Rogers Plumbing View Post
              Jetting is not a lot different than snaking a drain with a cable. If you got experience with a snake, then the transition into jetting will not be too hard to do. If you have no drain cleaning experience at all, then I'd recommend you start cleaning kitchen sink drains, washing machines, tubs, etc with a cable machine first before getting into jetting hardcore. Learn the basics first before getting into the advanced stuff.

              Also to second what Rick said, reading up and research is key. I researched for about a year before I built my first custom jetter last year.
              I've been drain cleaning for about 15 years now, but that's not the main focus of our business. Drain Cleaning over that 15 year span was more fill-in work then anything else, except for our regular customers. We have a K75a - Speedrooter 92 - and 2 K-50's, and we never go over 4" on anything. It's true what they say, most Plumbing & Heating contractors don't want to be bothered with drain cleaning...cause we simply never seem to have time for it. We are not going to push a boiler job aside to un-block a kitchen sink line..know what I mean? So just because I've done it for 15 years, someone who has been doing it every day for 5 years, is probably more advanced than me, cause he sees and does it every day.

              I can definitely hold my hold on using cables in sewer lines...but this whole jetting thing has me a tad nervous because I've only done it once with a buddy of mine. To be quite honest..I don't think he knows what he's doing either, and as much as I love the guy (no homo..lol) I don't want him teaching me anything about jetting.

              Now obviously I have winter's to deal with, and winterizing the jetter is a concern. I've searched online a few times for jetting information, and there isn't much out there as far a general knowledge of jetting goes. But then again I haven't looked too hard yet.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Jetting question

                If Drain Cleaning is only filler work fore you, then maybe you should stick with your cables. Is there a reason you are want to expand into jetting? Do you have clients that you could jet now that would be easier than cabling? If you do than I say go for it. If not, save your money and stick with your cables.
                Will Rogers Plumbing
                Moore, Oklahoma
                (
                405) 323-2852

                "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

                "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



                www.willrogersplumbing.com
                http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

                "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Jetting question

                  Originally posted by Will Rogers Plumbing View Post
                  If Drain Cleaning is only filler work fore you, then maybe you should stick with your cables. Is there a reason you are want to expand into jetting? Do you have clients that you could jet now that would be easier than cabling? If you do than I say go for it. If not, save your money and stick with your cables.
                  Eventually when my dad retires, it's going to be just me, and I want to get away from doing bigger jobs (additions) and focus solely on service and installations only, and expand on the drain cleaning a little bit. We have to turn work away in where a jetter would be more suitable than a cable, and that bothers me, cause some of those people are our regular customers. Without a camera and a jetter, I'm losing out on work in an economy where it would be nice to fill in with it, and it would take the "guess" part out of the equation for me. With gas prices soaring, those calls for rebuilding toilets and faucets go away, because the customer tries to fix it themselves...they can't do that with a sewer drain.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Jetting question

                    If that is the case than imo(others may have different opinion) you should get you a camera. The camera will be use on almost every drain cleaning call except secondary lines, the jetter is more of a luxury tool. A camera is a must have for a drain cleaner/plumber.
                    Will Rogers Plumbing
                    Moore, Oklahoma
                    (
                    405) 323-2852

                    "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

                    "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



                    www.willrogersplumbing.com
                    http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

                    "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Jetting question

                      Originally posted by Will Rogers Plumbing View Post
                      If that is the case than imo(others may have different opinion) you should get you a camera. The camera will be use on almost every drain cleaning call except secondary lines, the jetter is more of a luxury tool. A camera is a must have for a drain cleaner/plumber.
                      it's definitely on the list to buy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Jetting question

                        Worked for a short time at a Rooter company. Only jetted 3 times while there, and got no "formal" training. There's the hose, there's the pipe/cleanout etc. Very easy to pick up, but, more importantly, once you see the results and how thoroughly it cleans, you'll be sold like I was. I feel it's easier and safer(less likely to get stuck) than with cables. Not selling my cables, they still have their jobs. Once you figure out what you want(specs and price) for your new jetter BTW, plenty of stuff talked about here in the past; you can make a good purchase decision. Then on Sunday morning, you open the cleanout to your own house and start to get to know your jetter. Clean some friends lines. Have a fellow plumber or someone you trust clean a line while you watch what goes past the clean out. You'll be sold. You'll pick up the feel for it quickly; the key is buying the right stuff.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Jetting question

                          Originally posted by richinflorida View Post
                          Worked for a short time at a Rooter company. Only jetted 3 times while there, and got no "formal" training. There's the hose, there's the pipe/cleanout etc. Very easy to pick up, but, more importantly, once you see the results and how thoroughly it cleans, you'll be sold like I was. I feel it's easier and safer(less likely to get stuck) than with cables. Not selling my cables, they still have their jobs. Once you figure out what you want(specs and price) for your new jetter BTW, plenty of stuff talked about here in the past; you can make a good purchase decision. Then on Sunday morning, you open the cleanout to your own house and start to get to know your jetter. Clean some friends lines. Have a fellow plumber or someone you trust clean a line while you watch what goes past the clean out. You'll be sold. You'll pick up the feel for it quickly; the key is buying the right stuff.
                          Yea, I figured "friends" into the equation for practicing on, as I have 1 buddy who has a long a$$ sewer thats in C.I. and wraps around his house before it heads towards the street. Where I'm moving too, my cousin who is also a self employed Plumber, will be my neighbor so...I have options. But, Rick gave me some good information awhile back and I saved that information, but the reality of buying a jetter is starting to get closer. Not many Plumbers in my area offer jetting,(besides the big drain cleaning companies) and I want a piece of that pie in my area.

                          The concept of jetting seems easy to me, but so is picking up a hammer and driving nails. We have basements here...and that comes into play because I never see anyone here talk about jetting lines in a basement, unless I miss those discussions. I was just curious how everyone got started in jetting, and curious to see the answers.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Jetting question

                            First Nightmare jetting was in the early 90's with a Mustang Jetter. We blew Washing machine sludge everywhere (rookies). The salesman had told us that the jetter would replace our snake. I now Clear the line, Camera the line, Look through the entire house for issues (condensate p-traps, etc.), then I have a guy inside while I jet. I have since built my own jetter and have been fine tuning over the years. Jetting is good thing, but it is hard work (I think). It can be a hard sell, but I don't force it. I was just out on a job where 4 other plumbers told a homeowner that the line for the washing machine and kitchen sink needed to be replaced that it had collapsed. I ran my k-50 down through it and got if flowing, Then jetted it really good, so we could then get the camera down to see what everyone was looking at. Guess what? The line had not collapsed, it was just really clogged with 45 years of use. He now calls me for everything.

                            As for, jetting with a basement or any piping. You may need to plug some lines to prevent blow back or experiment with dialing into the right pressure. It will take time and you will make mistakes. If I had to clear a line in a basement, I wold probably rig up some kind of tee adapter with a drain hose that I could control, Tarps, etc. If it was old cast iron, I would plan on 3 hours for two men from start to finish. Setup and clean up would take a while. I have jetted a basement before, but It wasn't finished or anything, so I just washed everything down to the sump and cleaned up their pit really good when I was done. I also bleached the floor and sprayed air fresh to get rid of the smell.
                            "don't put that in your mouth, you don't know where it's been"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Jetting question

                              Flux, we jet very, very frequently and are by and large self taught, although prior to getting our own equipment we subbed it all out to another guy who did jetting as a business (he doesn't own cables), so we learned some by watching him but never held a hose until we owned one.

                              Honestly, outside of trial and error the single most effective teaching we have had came in three similar but altogether different forms:

                              www.ridgidforum.com
                              draincleaningforum.com
                              www.plumbingzone.com

                              I have learned more about hose and nozzle selection, pressures and flows, and so forth online than anywhere else.

                              Now as far as indoor jetting, in my opinion a large Shop-Vac is an absolute must have in all situations when jetting indoors. In small lines, we set up the vac with the end of the hose right at or under our access point and turn it on prior to doing any jetting. Because of the spray pattern on the nozzles, water will back up behind the nozzle even if the line is open. One way to keep the mess to a minimum is to get the line flowing first with a cable or quickly pop through the clog with your jet, then work the line in 5 or 10 second bursts, allowing enough time between bursts for the water behind the nozzle to drain past. If you manage to clean the line without any water coming back then fine, it doesn't hurt the vac to run dry, but it is there and running and if any water starts coming out of the cleanout a large vac will suck it up as it exits, before it can contaminate the surrounding area. Another option for situations like k-sinks is the get a deep pan or low bucket that fits under the waste arm and run your trap hose in, then place a rag over the whole shebang. Water coming back will stop at the rag and run down it into the pan or bucket, where your vac can either remove it as it accumulates, or you can simply wait til the pan is nearly full and shut the jet off and vac the pan out. Once the lines are clean you can just pour the contents of your vac down an outside cleanout or in a manhole if allowed. We jet anything 2" and smaller with a 1/8" trap hose which we keep coiled up in an old wheelbarrow tire, which allows you to carry the hose through the house after jetting without dripping.

                              When jetting sewers from an indoor access such as a W/C flange or basement cleanout, we will use the vac as well, or sometimes a bucket under the cleanout is sufficient. We very rarely make a mess in someones house. For sure not any more than running a cable.

                              A little common sense, a little practice, a little reading from the great pro's that have been doing this for years, and you'll do well.

                              Comment

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