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  • drum vs sectionals

    Ok guys ..I was brought up on the model c while learning the trade 10 years ago.But for the last 5 I've been on my own and always owned a spartan 1065.My back is starting to act up and was considering the drill n eel set up.Any perks using the sectional in your eyes.I love the convenience of a drum but I like the torque of the eel..what's say u gents.

  • #2
    Re: drum vs sectionals

    between my 10+ drum machines and my 5 1.25'' sectional machines, the tiberwolf and cable wins hands down and rides in my truck 24/7.


    although if traffic and parking wasn't a bear, my jetter would be riding with me daily.


    2 more jet jobs in the can today. along with a camera job.


    nothing comes close to what a jetter can do. just ask the customers who tried with their regular plumber before I was brought in to finish where they left off.


    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: drum vs sectionals

      O no we are not on this again as you all know that sectional is the best and for Rich sprouting about jetters again their rubbish without a camera when you hit a blockage with a cable and cutter you can actually feel the blockage and after years of experience can tell bad it is a plumber mate of mine who changed from a cable machine to a jetter was telling me that he was having a lot more call backs because the jetter was not clearing the pipes properly as a cable does

      Tony

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: drum vs sectionals

        Both serve their propose, choose your poison ......


        A jetter is rarely needed...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: drum vs sectionals

          If you work alone, sectional is hard to beat. If you have a guy working with you, drums are hard to beat..I like and use both.

          Jetter is next up for me. And once I have it I'll be pushing it more. On residential lines its not allways needed, but the jetter has it place.
          Will Rogers Plumbing
          Moore, Oklahoma
          (
          405) 323-2852

          "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

          "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



          www.willrogersplumbing.com
          http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

          "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: drum vs sectionals

            If you get into area drains, like I do, a jetter is a must.

            If you want the line spottless a jetter is a must.

            If you have limited cleanout choices, a jetter is a must.

            If you have long down hill runs, a jetter is a must.

            If you want to clear lines that others can't, a jetter is a must.

            if you want to get Into commercial cleaning, a jetter is a must.

            If you want to spend serious money and in return make serious money, a jetter is a must.

            If you don't believe me and othes that own a jetter, you don't want a jetter.

            That's ok, my jetter doesn't mind being spoiled.

            Rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: drum vs sectionals

              I said on residential a jetter is not always needed. In commercial they are a must.

              For Residential sewers a Mini Ex is more important. A 80 year clay sewer 100'+ long full of roots does not need to be jetted, it needs to be replaced.

              On commercial lines the jetter makes more since. That's whu I'm looking into getting a trailer unit, but I'm going all out with a 18gpm 4000psi unit. Mongoose is my front runner at the moment.
              Will Rogers Plumbing
              Moore, Oklahoma
              (
              405) 323-2852

              "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

              "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



              www.willrogersplumbing.com
              http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

              "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: drum vs sectionals

                Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                If you get into area drains, like I do, a jetter is a must.

                If you want the line spottless a jetter is a must.

                If you have limited cleanout choices, a jetter is a must.

                If you have long down hill runs, a jetter is a must.

                If you want to clear lines that others can't, a jetter is a must.

                if you want to get Into commercial cleaning, a jetter is a must.

                If you want to spend serious money and in return make serious money, a jetter is a must.

                If you don't believe me and othes that own a jetter, you don't want a jetter.

                That's ok, my jetter doesn't mind being spoiled.

                Rick.


                I don't want one because I really do not have the need for one.

                I'm having excellent success with my cable machines. The only time I would have absolutely needed a jetter on a residential line would have been this last winter with the 25+ frozen sewers I encountered. I had no problems referring them out as I'm plenty busy with my cable machines and don't need the drama of a jetter especially in the winter and in basements.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: drum vs sectionals

                  Originally posted by Will Rogers Plumbing View Post
                  I said on residential a jetter is not always needed. In commercial they are a must.

                  For Residential sewers a Mini Ex is more important. A 80 year clay sewer 100'+ long full of roots does not need to be jetted, it needs to be replaced.

                  On commercial lines the jetter makes more since. That's whu I'm looking into getting a trailer unit, but I'm going all out with a 18gpm 4000psi unit. Mongoose is my front runner at the moment.
                  Here's where we part ways. Most clay I run into cleans up beautifully. After I get done jetting, you can't even see the roots. Most of the clay I run into was laid well....no offsets, or sags....just roots. If there are offsets or sags that cause a stoppage, I agree 100% for repair or replacement. Just speaking for my location, most sewer replacements are starting at 5k and go way up since there's clay in the street and that fall's into the responsibility of the homeowner. Let say the average cleaning cost 500 but last 2-3 years(mine do). It would take 20-30 years for the homeowner to spend that 5k(or way more). Do you know what will happen in 20-30 years? Are you still going to be around, will you be living in the same house, etc. OR do you know what you can do with 5K(+)right now? It's just a different thought and doesn't me right or you wrong or vice versa.
                  Buy cheap, buy twice.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: drum vs sectionals

                    what a backwards trade we are in. This is just flat out getting funny.


                    I can do everything an excavator can do with a shovel.


                    I can do everything a forklift can do with a hand truck and ladder.


                    I can do everything a car can do with a good pair of walking shoes.


                    I can do everything a washing machine can do with a washboard.


                    I can do everything an impact wrench can do with an adjustable wrench


                    I can do everything a tractor can do with a hoe.


                    and on and on and on

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: drum vs sectionals

                      Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                      Here's where we part ways. Most clay I run into cleans up beautifully. After I get done jetting, you can't even see the roots. Most of the clay I run into was laid well....no offsets, or sags....just roots. If there are offsets or sags that cause a stoppage, I agree 100% for repair or replacement. Just speaking for my location, most sewer replacements are starting at 5k and go way up since there's clay in the street and that fall's into the responsibility of the homeowner. Let say the average cleaning cost 500 but last 2-3 years(mine do). It would take 20-30 years for the homeowner to spend that 5k(or way more). Do you know what will happen in 20-30 years? Are you still going to be around, will you be living in the same house, etc. OR do you know what you can do with 5K(+)right now? It's just a different thought and doesn't me right or you wrong or vice versa.

                      yep I had one I couldn't get open. excavator came in and dug it was full of roots from my locate about 10 foot from the road. got to the road still full of roots. Home owner could not afford to dig the road. I called in a jetter to jet under the road now everything is fine. and for a not much money compared to a road cut.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: drum vs sectionals

                        Originally posted by sewermonster85 View Post
                        Ok guys ..I was brought up on the model c while learning the trade 10 years ago.But for the last 5 I've been on my own and always owned a spartan 1065.My back is starting to act up and was considering the drill n eel set up.Any perks using the sectional in your eyes.I love the convenience of a drum but I like the torque of the eel..what's say u gents.


                        All this and Sewermonster just wanted to know if he should get a sectional!
                        Now were portraying anyone without a Jetter is so 1960.

                        A good man with decent equipment can get the job done.

                        Our business models, needs, locations and economic and geographic areas are all different.
                        Lets respect that and move on.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: drum vs sectionals

                          Originally posted by fixitright View Post
                          All this and Sewermonster just wanted to know if he should get a sectional!
                          Now were portraying anyone without a Jetter is so 1960.

                          A good man with decent equipment can get the job done.

                          Our business models, needs, locations and economic and geographic areas are all different.
                          Lets respect that and move on.

                          Good point. Funny thing is I don't have a jetter, but I don't lie to myself about my capabilities with a cable because of it.


                          anyway you will love a good sectional if your hands and wrists can hold up to them

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: drum vs sectionals

                            Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                            Here's where we part ways. Most clay I run into cleans up beautifully. After I get done jetting, you can't even see the roots. Most of the clay I run into was laid well....no offsets, or sags....just roots. If there are offsets or sags that cause a stoppage, I agree 100% for repair or replacement. Just speaking for my location, most sewer replacements are starting at 5k and go way up since there's clay in the street and that fall's into the responsibility of the homeowner. Let say the average cleaning cost 500 but last 2-3 years(mine do). It would take 20-30 years for the homeowner to spend that 5k(or way more). Do you know what will happen in 20-30 years? Are you still going to be around, will you be living in the same house, etc. OR do you know what you can do with 5K(+)right now? It's just a different thought and doesn't me right or you wrong or vice versa.
                            Maybe for your area, but not mine. Maybe because we have clay soil and it expands more than your area not sure. But the times I snake out a clay sewer and find it intact with no issues is almost non insisting for my area. Concrete sewers are even worst, and orangeburg being the worst of all.
                            Will Rogers Plumbing
                            Moore, Oklahoma
                            (
                            405) 323-2852

                            "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

                            "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



                            www.willrogersplumbing.com
                            http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

                            "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: drum vs sectionals

                              Pretty much summed it up.I am partial to my drum machines but i dont want to knock the sectional I know it's torque and it's advantages .but the 1065 gets its use about three times a day.but the back is getting a beating.most of my jobs are from basement (unfinished) or o.s.c.o or catch basins.im thinking about ricks timber wolf and eel cable set up.the times I really need a drum are for those dreaded toilet pulls.A jetter wouldn't serve me well especially in the cold winters here and the expense in one investment doesn't seem to fit with me.ive only had a camera for less than a year now and just purchased my second.i pay for my trucks and tools and equipment in full.i don't want crazy payments in case it gets a Lil slow.every piece of equipment has its purpose and need.but I think I'm gonna get a sectional.my buddy said he'll sell me 200 ' of the 1.25" cable quick connection style for 300 bucks to start me off.and the drill is around 400 new so why not.i already have 200 foot but it's the older cable that's a pita to connect and dis connect.i have 20 +cutters for the eel.i would love a jetter but i dont have 15 K for a trailer pull along type.and the winters here are brutal.

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