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  • pulling toilets

    now this is not a argument thread. this is just a question type

    90% of all main lines I have to pull the toilet. roofs here can get pretty steep and in the winter the snow is to deep and cold. a very long time ago before I had a k-60 I used a speedy rooter 92. and would add extra cable to that to get my reach 150 to 200 feet common here. for the last what? 10 years using k-60.
    most houses are very old cast 4 inch. and the bathrooms are very small. and it can be trying at times to use it in these very small bath rooms( you don't even have elbow room). I would like to know what others here are using without the fight. just tell me what you like for my situation. I see they have the 92 plus now. just thinking out load.
    thanks
    the only dumb question is the one that is not asked!

  • #2
    Clean out in the front would be my suggestion.150-200' is a long run especially through a toilet plus add in all the changes of direction ,that job will beat you to death...I use a drum machine spartan 1065.Spartan 2001 allows you to switch drums pretty easily but that machines 3-4K .Or even a sled machine ,those things can hold150'+in the drum .id stick with the k60 ,keep adding on cable .we use to run 2" pvc across the floor to hold the cable it helped a lot but 3 hours or so it takes a toll on your back.and 150' out whatever machine you use will be sluggish do to the amount of cable you have to runThats got to be a pretty expensive rodding
    Last edited by sewermonster85; 03-16-2017, 08:07 PM.

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    • AssTyme
      AssTyme commented
      Editing a comment
      Can the 60 spin 200 feet of cable and still be effective???

    • sewermonster85
      sewermonster85 commented
      Editing a comment
      I doubt it maybe 150

  • #3
    "90% of all main lines I have to pull the toilet" "150 to 200 feet common here"

    You have to be kidding me??? I would find a different profession.

    Where are you located? I want to stay far away...
    Last edited by AssTyme; 03-16-2017, 08:09 PM.

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    • sewermonster85
      sewermonster85 commented
      Editing a comment
      Bro u took the words right out of my mouth

  • #4
    I don't have the distance that you typically have, but 100' is not that uncommon. And a cleanout is like a unicorn here as well. From forums, I've learned that some in the business have it much, much, easier. If I had something like clay pipes, aging cast iron, and easier access, drain cleaning might be fun.

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    • #5
      WOW WOW WOW

      Pulling a K-60 back or getting out that for :::;;; .. = Man of steel

      A big root ball well over a 100' out with a K-60 is a recipe for ... Well you know

      Comment


      • #6
        150-200' is jetter time. a good transfer pump and i would blow the waste water outside. but 150'-200' with a cable machine inside is nuts. i don't have time for that with a cable machine. my jetter would be downstream in under 1 minute with 1/4'' hose.

        i don't like jetting from inside, but given your choice under those circumstances, jetter all the way.

        Rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • AssTyme
          AssTyme commented
          Editing a comment
          "i would blow the waste water outside"

          Is that legal in California?

        • PLUMBER RICK
          PLUMBER RICK commented
          Editing a comment
          no different than fertilizing your lawn. it's 99% water. paper and waste doesn't go through the transfer pump. we also have large rolling trash cans that hold 55-75 or more gallons. easily pumped back into the system with my jet vac or transfer pump. i just picked up 6- 55 gallon poly drums from my car wash customer to go with my 6 brute rolling cans. transferring water is simple.

          Rick.

      • #7
        I'd use a jetter but I'd have to see the setup for getting all that water out.
        a lot of old houses used to have tanks. Now all tied to city many years ago. Goes around back of house, around side and then to the city through 50 to 100 feet of yard.

        Manhole can be 3-4 houses away or more!
        Last edited by Jerad; 03-16-2017, 09:25 PM.
        the only dumb question is the one that is not asked!

        Comment


        • #8
          You are a far better man than me sir.You deserve a medal that s a ton of work.But what Rick says makes sense. The transfer pump to a brute can out the window thing while jetting is something we've done before a few times.Once we get it open .we camera it ,we locate it and recommend a clean out

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          • #9
            Tile hole. Find the sewer line with a soil probe, dig it up, knock a hole in the top and run the sewer from there. Then install a proper twin co. If they can't afford or just plain don't want a proper co then cover the hole with tin and bury it. Take good notes on where the hole is for your records so you know where to dig next time. I've gotten some $hit about this method on this forum before but the method works, and you can use a bigger blade going through a tile hole than you can through a 3" stool opening and there's not much mess control to worry about.
            Last edited by Cable or root; 03-18-2017, 11:32 PM.
            -Byron

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            • #10
              Had 2 sludge jobs yesterday. 3 " c.o. had to jet over 100' to clear the line 2 of 3 bathrooms were plugged. The master was a newer one that had to run to the front when they tied in. The owner said 3 of the eprior guys failed to clear the line and still charged them. I figured the line ran to the rear for an old septic. The rear working mast3r mush have run around to the front, bypassing the line that ran to the rear.

              jetter brought out piles of sludge and paper before finally wsshing the line clean and flowing.

              100' of sludge from a 3" c.o. in a 4" line would have been a lesson in snaking. With the jetter it was 1 hour to payday.

              second job was also a 3" c.o in a 8 unit apt. Bldg. Not only was it a 2 way c.o. non directional. It was lined improperly 2 years ago. Snake would have been fun geeting throught the blind 2 way, c.o, but the liner was already lifting at the transition and the cutter would have made things worse. Jetter washed the line clean and without damaging the liner more than it already is. The 3" c.o. needs to be dug up and a proper repair made to the liner and 2way c.o.

              Rick.
              phoebe it is

              Comment


              • #11
                Originally posted by Cable or root View Post
                Tile hole. Find the sewer line with a soil probe, dig it up, knock a hole in the top and run the sewer from there. Then install a proper twin co. If they can't afford or just plain don't want a proper co then cover the hole with tin and bury it. Take good notes on where the hole is for your records so you know where to dig next time. I've gotten some $hit about this method on this forum before but the method works, and you can use a bigger blade going through la tile hole than you can through a 3" stool opening and there's not much mess control to worry about.

                That would work well in the southern states but here sewer lines are located below the frost line. That's usually four foot or more
                depending on the topography.

                Comment


                • AssTyme
                  AssTyme commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Average being around 8 feet for a home with basement which around here is about 99%.

              • #12
                Sewers are about half and half here, if the line is basement depth 95%of the time I can find the clean out on the main stack even if it's drywalled over
                -Byron

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                • #13
                  Basements 99% of the time here at least 6 feet sometimes more.
                  the only dumb question is the one that is not asked!

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