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  • Say it isn't so

    As you all know I've never really cared for the k50.
    but after 4 consecutive sludge sink line jobs that I had to use a push rod on ,I think a k50 will be on my truck soon enogh..as much as I said I'd never do it I'm going to break down and get me one.funny thing my pistol rod ,and my k375 couldn't clear it ,but I keep a 100' old sewer camera pushrod on the truck that I hook a garden hose to and it cleared it on the first pass.I tried with the rodders for an hour. Like the idea of a smaller footprint sectional machine for longer sink runs.

  • #2
    It never fails when you look at it with an open mind. If you look ask on this site Rick and I had a sectional v drum debate about 13 years ago. Rick finally bought one but never even tried it. After an extended period of time he finally tried one. Soon he replaced all of his drum machines with sectionals. Now that he has his wacker I'm guessing the sectionals are getting a rest.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #3
      Run 5/8" sections 5' long with a drill?

      Comment


      • #4
        K-50 along with the 2 drum attachments are the best... I would never leave the shop with out it.
        Website: www.LeGrandAndCompany.com
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        • #5
          Mark is so correct. The k50 works great on kitchen sludge, laundry lint. My whacker is the best of the best, but 2" is not a simple task at times with my whacker. Of course until I make a smaller mini me whacker.

          But yes, a k50 is the best for those difficult grease, floor sink jobs, laundry, shower drains.

          Rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            Why would a K-50 be better than a K-3800 with a sink drum which is what I use or in sewer's case a k-375? Both are cabled... I've had a few lines that were really filled with sludge, it took a while of pushing it in and out but eventually I got it open.

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            • fixitright
              fixitright commented
              Editing a comment
              I had to cut open a line last night.
              Would have been a bit easier if it was plumbed right.

              I'd like to see a better selection of cutters for the K-50.
              I don't have one but I use a 1/2 cable from ridgid with the same end.

            • sewermonster85
              sewermonster85 commented
              Editing a comment
              I like the idea of being able to fully clean the cables while pulling them back...open wind cable with alot of water running while the machine is running ,cleans the cable real good.. beats putting it back in the drum and risk spitting all over the place next time you use it.

            • TomSV650
              TomSV650 commented
              Editing a comment
              I have both a the K-3800 and K-60 with 80ft of 5/8 cable on the truck. I don't think the sectional is necessary better, it does a better job clearing out those sludged up lines but it can make a heck of a mess. Inside jobs the 3800 is always used.. Your best bet when the line is bad, is after you run the snake several times, use a blow bag. That always seems to clear the line.

          • #7
            By nature a machine that spins faster and has a large cable that is open and acts like an continuous auger.

            I can tell you that right now my whacker with chain cutter is the best cleaning machine out there. It's even better than my jetter with a lot less mess.

            Nothing like a chain scraping the entire walls of the pipe at a 2000-3000 rpm rotation. add some running water and it's a jetter on steroids.

            but if you don't want to whack it, then a k50 sectional does a better job than a drum cable machine. it's just the fact that an open wind cable running faster rpm's will clean better.

            Rick.
            phoebe it is

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            • #8
              sewermonster85 commented
              Yesterday, 11:37 PM
              I like the idea of being able to fully clean the cables while pulling them back...open wind cable with alot of water running while the machine is running ,cleans the cable real good.. beats putting it back in the drum and risk spitting all over the place next time you use it.
              I run my cable in the line with full pressure of water so it comes out clean and using disposable shop towel to wipe it on the way back. I then turn the drum upside down outside to let residual water out . It doesn't splash the next time I use it. the last 15 feet does get caked with rusty ice. Very rarely I can use a 3/8 cable, in 1 1/2" kitchen drain line and 90 are a real problem of getting stuck. I tell the customer If I use that then I may have to cut up all their walls and pipes. I've only used it when the 50' x 5/16" wasn't long enough or I couldn't punch through.

              I broke a drop head once 3/8" cable so I had to pull the laundry tub cabinet, cut up a good portion of the wall and pipes to retrieve it. In the process I found out it was all hack plumbing. I never got it unclogged as they didn't want to pay to repipe and I just capped it and left. I need to find a nail to pin the drop head to the attachment.

              ​​​​​​​I will not use a sectional in home over here, I will end up doing free jobs when they say I stained or dirtied something or scratched their deluxe stainless fridge or glass oven.

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              • #9
                Last week I had to drain clean two x 1 1/2" kitchen column of a 3 story condo building. I encountered about 3-4 90's on the way down. It took a very long time with the 5/16 with a spring lead. I tried the freaking 1/8" jetter and got only 3 feet in until the first 90 and that was the end of it. I'm starting to regret the purchase.

                I also though to myself, what if I was able to use the jetter in this situation and upon dropping it from the 3rd floor it decides to go into the 2nd or 1st floor tee toward the kitchen sink and spewing crud from the kitchen sink drain all over their counters, walls, toaster, oven etc? I won't know about it and it's going to be hell on earth when they come back to kill me with pitch forks, not to mention thousand of dollar in claims. I guess cabling is the only option to clean the line.

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                • red1234
                  red1234 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  If you use a k50 a few times ,I do not think you will regret this purchase.Also,150'reaches can be done,but only a few times have I ever had to do so.

              • #10
                Pro Service- I used to doubt the additional cleaning power of the k-50 vs the k-3800 as well. Then I got one. I still have my k-3800 (which has seen thousands of drains) on my van just in case but it's been months since it's seen action. As Rick mentioned, the faster spin as well as wider cable helps clean lines more effectively. Not to mention it's easier to get the 5/8" cable down a 2" or 1 1/2" trap vs a 3/8" or 1/2" cable. Sure you could use a smaller cable but you'd lose even more cleaning power, even with kinks in the cable.

                I'd say my favorite thing about sectionals is using them in very greasy lines with no cleanouts. I run the cable and before pulling the whole thing out I pull out just enough to have one joint near the trap. I put the trap on then test the line. If it's still clogged I can just remove the trap, hook up another section of cable and continue snaking. Sometimes I'll even hook it up to my 18v drill and spin the cable even faster.

                As far as your jetting situation, those lines I usually start with the snake then do the jetter. I run the jetter as far as it needs to go as fast as possible. I then pull the jetter back slowly. That was the loosened debris will get pushed down pipe that should be open. If you start from the access point you do risk chunks getting loosened then clogging a section below that is also restricted.

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                • #11
                  Originally posted by VA plumber View Post
                  Pro Service- I used to doubt the additional cleaning power of the k-50 vs the k-3800 as well. Then I got one. I still have my k-3800 (which has seen thousands of drains) on my van just in case but it's been months since it's seen action. As Rick mentioned, the faster spin as well as wider cable helps clean lines more effectively. Not to mention it's easier to get the 5/8" cable down a 2" or 1 1/2" trap vs a 3/8" or 1/2" cable. Sure you could use a smaller cable but you'd lose even more cleaning power, even with kinks in the cable.

                  I'd say my favorite thing about sectionals is using them in very greasy lines with no cleanouts. I run the cable and before pulling the whole thing out I pull out just enough to have one joint near the trap. I put the trap on then test the line. If it's still clogged I can just remove the trap, hook up another section of cable and continue snaking. Sometimes I'll even hook it up to my 18v drill and spin the cable even faster.

                  As far as your jetting situation, those lines I usually start with the snake then do the jetter. I run the jetter as far as it needs to go as fast as possible. I then pull the jetter back slowly. That was the loosened debris will get pushed down pipe that should be open. If you start from the access point you do risk chunks getting loosened then clogging a section below that is also restricted.
                  That's one thing that has puzzled me from day one are the guys saying they use a 5/8 cable in a 1 1/2" pipe. I just can't see it happening unless the cable is hollow and bends like a rag. Just as an example it impossible to get a 3/8 ridgid cable from my k-3800 into a 90 if you have't put the soft spring bit in front and even then it's a very low chance it's going to go. Heck the only way I can get my 5/16 though hidden 90's is with my spring lead from general wire, no other bit head ever worked for me, they all stopped cold. Did I say my sink drum only works if it's on reverse and that is a lot slower speed. On forward the cable tangles inside the drum instantly.

                  Comment


                  • greg755
                    greg755 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    That's another reason I like the K-50 drums. Unless you abuse the heck out of it or run it backwards is is hard to get the cable to knot up in the drum.
                    Last edited by greg755; 01-11-2019, 10:26 AM.

                  • sewermonster85
                    sewermonster85 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    For 3/8" cable use eel cables or general..you can add additional drops and the bulb is smaller for those tight galvy 90s

                  • JFDI
                    JFDI commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Before my Switch Pack my K-50 was my absolute go to machine for pipes 30mm - 80mm (mostly commercial). 80% of my typical pipe cleans with the K-50 would be 40mm kitchen waste-pipe running to a stack or external gully.

                    I always used the 5/8" cable to clear them & have even done a dubious 40mm pipe that ran 40m (130') to the stack. The cable is so nimble (have run it through close to a dozen 45's & 90's bends on some jobs).

                    I loved it so much I got rid of my K-3800 as I found the cable front ends too bulky & inflexible when trying to make tight bends.

                    Even though I now use my switch pack, I'd never sell the K-50, just in case.

                • #12
                  If I'm going to snake a 1 1/2" line I use the "reverse auger" which is just a cut section of cable. The flexibility of the cable makes 90's relatively easy to navigate. There is a bit of a learning curve if you're only used to drum machines.
                  I don't make any more of a mess than with a drum machine. I'm the type to always lay tarps and drop cloths regardless of the condition of the house.
                  Do you think your cable is twisting in the drum because the drum is too big? If there is too much free space it will allow the cable to twist easily. The only time I've had that happen was when pushing a 3/8 cable too hard into a root infested main. One of the guys I worked with used to replace his cables at least every other month. When he got a smaller drum he stopped having issues. The only issue is the drums are pretty expensive for what they are.

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                  • #13
                    greg755 commented
                    Today, 08:22 PM
                    That's another reason I like the K-50 drums. Unless you abuse the heck out of it or run it backwards is is hard to get the cable to not up in the drum.
                    I also don't see how the k-50 what looks like a small machine on tip toes be versatile like a K-3800. I've never seen one in person but you can't tilt the cable up to reach a high place. I assume just a little sideways and it would tip over as well? Will it handle a high spinning 1/2 cable? And lastly how to do you keep it very compact in a luxury kitchen or 3 foot bathroom and not staining the carpet and such???

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                    • #14
                      Originally posted by Pro Service View Post

                      I also don't see how the k-50 what looks like a small machine on tip toes be versatile like a K-3800. I've never seen one in person but you can't tilt the cable up to reach a high place. I assume just a little sideways and it would tip over as well? Will it handle a high spinning 1/2 cable? And lastly how to do you keep it very compact in a luxury kitchen or 3 foot bathroom and not staining the carpet and such???
                      It's not that difficult to keep things clean. I do the same setup with a drum or sectional. Lay a tarp down on the floor, a heavy duty trash bag under the sink and you're set. The machine comes with a hose you attach to the rear so the cable isn't just spinning freely on the ground.
                      As for snaking on higher access points, I just use my 3 step stool. It fits just right and is sturdy. I've heard others use milk crates for that. The main reason I still have my k-3800 is for those types of jobs. If I don't have space for the stool then I'll use the drum. Those are few and far between for me .Like I said, it's been months since I've used the drum.
                      I don't think you can use 1/2" cable. The largest cable I've seen for the k50 drum was 3/8". And that was only 20 to 25 feet long. I have 2 k50 drums and one has 35 feet of 1/4" cable, the second has 20 feet of 3/8". The 3/8" is pretty difficult to pull and push out so I can imagine 1/2" wouldn't be worth the hassle of trying to fit it in those small drums. If you're looking to use a cable that large that's what the 5/8" is for. I've used the 5/8 in everything from 1 1/2" to 4" pipe.

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                      • #15
                        Originally posted by VA plumber View Post
                        If I'm going to snake a 1 1/2" line I use the "reverse auger" which is just a cut section of cable. The flexibility of the cable makes 90's relatively easy to navigate. There is a bit of a learning curve if you're only used to drum machines.
                        I don't make any more of a mess than with a drum machine. I'm the type to always lay tarps and drop cloths regardless of the condition of the house.
                        Do you think your cable is twisting in the drum because the drum is too big? If there is too much free space it will allow the cable to twist easily. The only time I've had that happen was when pushing a 3/8 cable too hard into a root infested main. One of the guys I worked with used to replace his cables at least every other month. When he got a smaller drum he stopped having issues. The only issue is the drums are pretty expensive for what they are.
                        I have the small sink drum designed for smaller cables. It wasn't easy to get get either, it took several months of waiting and I even griped about it. Even 2-3 ridgid people didn't know why but I have confirmation from another guy who is in the same situation. Only reverse works, it spins a lot slower but it doesn't tangle. I did all my sink like that (maybe 12 since I bought the sink drum). The good thing about it is I can feel when I encounter an elbow and I can gently navigate it. Not sure about you guys but here plumbers and hacks love to put short radius vent 90's for drainage which makes it very difficult. Our lines are always abs and older homes have copper DWV and CI under the slab.










                        Last edited by Pro Service; 01-11-2019, 09:00 AM.

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