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My Whacker has come a long way

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  • My Whacker has come a long way

    Thought I would start a new thread about my whacker.
    My First build was for a special project that I performed on 10/22/17. The homeowner had their slab on grade home remodeled over a 2 year move out. While the home was not occupied for that time, the little bit of cast iron pipe that remained under the slab of their new kitchen had rusted heavily and within 2 weeks of them moving back in had caused a stoppage. The stoppage affected their new island kitchen sink, powder room and upper floor master bathroom suite. Of course the general contractor didn’t want to address the issue since the piping under that part of the slab was not touched.

    So I perform a sewer camera inspection from the removed powder room sink line and determined that the older cast iron from the 17’ - 22’ distance had developed a heavy cast scale from sitting over the 2 year remodeling project. So for the 9 day period while I gather and build my first 25’ test whacker, I told the owner that the toilet is only to be used for a # 1 flush, no paper or solids. No big worries as there were 2 other bathrooms for the mrs, that were not on that same line.

    I returned with my newly made and barely tested Rick Whacker. This time pulling the powder room toilet, allowing me to run my camera and whacker into the line and position the chains right at the 5-0’ section of old cast iron pipe. While descale get the line and washing the grit away into the downstream abs pipe. I was able to see my results from out of service to smooth as a new cast iron pipe.

    That was 4.5 years ago and the line has not plugged up since.

    So 4.5 years and miles of whacking lines with heavy Roots, grease, scale, dirt. The whacker is my go too drain cleaning machine. My jetter has less than 10% of its pre whacker use. My k60 has probably been used 5 times over the last 4.5 years. My k50 still gets used for jobs that I can’t get with my k9-102.

    So do you need to buy a manufactured product or build your own Whacker. Well in my case, building is the way to go. Cost is 10% of a factory built unit. But what the real selling point is, is the portability , size and weight factor.

    Today, I had a main line stoppage not too far from my softball field. So I loaded my whacker, cord and drill into my suv and took care of the sight unseen whole house stoppage. Turned out to be whole house stoppage upstream from the outside 4” 2 way clean out. Cleared it to the house and also ran it 70’ from the 4” to 6” to city main. Not bad going in the blind and working out of my weekend suv.

    So 4.5 years and miles of drains later, yes the whacker has proved itself over and over again.

    When others can’t hack it, Rick will whack it.

    Rick.
    phoebe it is

  • #2
    I looked but could not find a previous post by you about this. I was going to add a link here so others could read the history but after searching on your User ID and 'whacker' nothing found. I looked back in this topic area through all the threads started in 2017 but nothing caught my eye. I didn't look through every post in all those threads just the subject lines. Do you remember where/when you posted it Rick? I remember reading about it back then.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
    http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
    https://youtube.com/@bobd.
    ----

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    • #3
      I'm going on 3 years using my homemade flex shaft ... I have since purchased from my neighbors up north ( Drain Rehab ) there 3/8" flex shaft ... I much prefer my homemade over there's .

      I'm able to run with a electric foot pedal my homemade with a 1/2 " hammer drill on a stand and can run mine further down the line compared to Drain Rehab's . I do a lot of annual maintenance , after the initial camera of the line to document the problem areas and cleaning I'm in and out the next year.

      Good to hear from you Rick .

      Comment


      • #4
        I also recall Rick posting about his whacker. I don't really do any sort of drain cleaning and never even had a drain plug up in my own home so I did not pay too much attention to the details.

        Comment


        • #5
          Totally and completely amazed that you would own a K9-102 and not one of your own makes after all the
          accomplishments in past.

          Is this a plug for Ridgid or did you come to the other side?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by fixitright View Post
            Totally and completely amazed that you would own a K9-102 and not one of your own makes after all the
            accomplishments in past.

            Is this a plug for Ridgid or did you come to the other side?
            My whackers are not caged up. Therefore when working indoors, typically on smaller lines such as shower and laundry drains, a caged up machine is more desired. Plus a k9-102 doesn’t take up much room or weight an arm and a leg. Price wise, yes you’re paying for the RIDGID name at close to $20. A foot.

            My newest 6mm x 65’ whacker I just greased up with a synthetic food grade silicone grease spins all 65’ while inside a smaller cage than the k9. Have yet to use it on a real job as I just finished it a few days ago.

            Remember a cable laid out in a straight line outside of a cage, will generate more torque than a cable trying to spin that’s all wound up in a tight circle. Also while they suggest a cordless drill with a clutch for fear of damage. A straight cable laid out generates more power and the cable will jump when it encounters an obstacle that can stall the cutter.

            My 3/8 and 1/2” cables are run full speed with an electric high speed drill. No clutch and and no issues with damage. 75’ and 100’ are my 2 go too sizes.

            Rick



            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Mr. Rick touched on the subject of the type of lubricant he uses on his whacker ... I do annual maintenance for a owner of a ball bearing distributorship and this subject came up .. he gave a tub of MolyKote ( free ) to use . That's the lubricant I use on mine.

              You want to stay away from any petroleum base lubricants because it will break down the plastic properties of the outer jacket ... Silicone base is the way to go that's high heat and moisture resistant .. MolyKote and or plumbers grease is expensive there's probably a silicone base or non petroleum base alternative out there.

              Comment


              • #8
                So, any of you want to dm me what sleeve you use or where to get it? I have an extra 75' 3/8" cable laying around I'd like to put to use. I have the K9 306 but that beast is too bulky for everyday carry in my van.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by VA plumber View Post
                  So, any of you want to dm me what sleeve you use or where to get it? I have an extra 75' 3/8" cable laying around I'd like to put to use. I have the K9 306 but that beast is too bulky for everyday carry in my van.
                  I use what Rick use's unless he improved his jacket .... Mine's the left pic .


                  Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2022-04-26-16-06-58-471.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.17 MB ID:	752453Click image for larger version  Name:	ricks wacker.png Views:	0 Size:	3.58 MB ID:	752454

                  I'll send you PM as not to let the cat out of the bag .

                  Comment


                  • fixitright
                    fixitright commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Guessing it's ---------- hose or --- line
                    I have a piece from my original Clog Dog with a brand name somewhere.
                    The new Clog Dog lines are custom made and say Clog Dog on them.

                  • PLUMBER RICK
                    PLUMBER RICK commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yes, my job from the roof down the 3” that I use to have to jet while the line was full of $hit. Now I don’t need to worry about blow back nor trying to park my Jetter van close to the house.

                    It’s approx a 50’ run from the roof and then another 90’ run from the outside clean out.

                    Hope you didn’t jinx it and I get a phone call today.

                    Rick

                • #10
                  I occasionally run into a kitchen sink drain that too grease-intensive for my cable or little General jetter. I saw this ridgid 1/4" flex shaft cable and knocker on Amazon. Could I just use my high speed cordless drill on this set up and get the job done? I realize I would have to stretch the cable out in the house, but a couple of tarps should make it ok.
                  Attached Files
                  "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Absolutely, that’s the cable from the Ridgid k9-102 minus the drum and right angle drive. You might need to get started with a single chain and water is your friend. Going in dry is going to be a lot of in and out passes and get messy. Make sure to use a cordless drill with clutch as the cable is easily tweaked if it gets locked up. But outside the drum, the cable will jump and act like a clutch.

                    Mark your cable with colored tape and you’ll know the exact distance where things are. Get some wet scrubs to clean the greasy cable. Normal stoppages, non grease, the cable is clean and just a rag to wipe it down inside.

                    5/16” cable is a better choice if you have a 2” line. A bit stronger and can push further.

                    Take your time to learn the feel. And add a check adapter as you’ll ruin the flexshaft if you chuck it in a drill with a bald end. I use to make my own with assorted rod couplings and tap the side for set screws. But now you can easily buy ones ready made.

                    Rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Thanks so much for all the great advice Rick.
                      "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        When I think of a chuck adpater this is what comes to mind. But since that would be no different than putting the cable in the drill chuck you must be referring to something different. Would it be like a hex shank with a sleeve to slide the cable in and a set screw or two to secure the cable?
                        Attached Files
                        "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	image.png Views:	0 Size:	251.0 KB ID:	753796

                          This one is sold by plumber tools. A few other versions out there.

                          OKAY rick. Its a good time after all these years to spill the beans on what you use for your whacker cable and cover.
                          We've been waiting for years.

                          I've read everything from you starting with the K 50, K 60 use and repairs.
                          We are ready to hear more.
                          Last edited by fixitright; 09-09-2022, 01:26 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Thank you Fixitright. That's exactly what I had in mind.
                            "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

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