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Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

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  • Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

    I just bought a premade shed and it is prewired. All I was supposed to do is run a line into the shed. It is set up with 2 outlets, 2 lights, and 1 switch. One receptacle is a GFI outlet and the other one is not. This would have been fine, but they didn't run the normal outlet to the load side of the GFI. Basically giving me no ground fault protection for that outlet. I was just going to move the wires to the load side, but I noticed that the lights are wired into a shared neutral. I hope I can explain this right.

    They have a hot (constant), neutral, and hot (light switch) running into conduit that goes to two lights and the unprotected receptacle. The hot (constant) goes all the way to the receptacle. The hot (light switch) runs to both lights. The neutral is connected to the light switches and receptacle.

    I would be fine connecting the hot (constant) wire to the load side of the GFI breaker, but what about the other wires? If I connect the neutral wire to the load side. It will be looking for return current deviations (I'm assuming that is how GFI's work). Well, the lights seem like they will trick the GFI into thinking that it is leaking power. This is because the lights are not run off of the load side of the GFI breaker. Right???

    Here are my options:
    1. I could pig tail the wire coming off of the load side of the GFI outlet and connect the wire to the lights (preswitch) and the unprotected outlet. This would be equivalent to someone plugging in a light into the non-GFI outlet. The GFI outlet should see no difference as far as load is concerned. I would just have ground fault protection for both lights and a receptacle.

    2. Run a neutral wire to the lights and use the existing neutral wire for the receptacle. I would connect it to the load side of the GFI outlet.

    3. Buy another GFI outlet to replace the unprotected outlet. I would then not use the load side of either GFI outlet and direct wire both.

    Am I missing anything? Any input? Which one should I do, or is there a better way? Should I complain to the shed manufacturer to get reimbursed for them not wiring the shed correctly?
    Last edited by fronty; 04-26-2007, 04:57 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

    Where are you asked to connect the supply wire - to the line side of the GFI? If that is the case then the hot and neutral for the light and other plug must be in that box and could be run from the load side of the GFI

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    • #3
      Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

      are you sure the white/ neutral going to the switch is actually a neutral and not romex that's not properly color coded on a switch leg?

      didn't read your post 100%, but find it hard to believe the shed manufacturer makes this mistake on all his products.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

        Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
        Where are you asked to connect the supply wire - to the line side of the GFI? If that is the case then the hot and neutral for the light and other plug must be in that box and could be run from the load side of the GFI
        Yes, it does go into the line side of the GFI. That is the option 1 I gave. I'm assuming you think that is the best way to tackle it.

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        • #5
          Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
          are you sure the white/ neutral going to the switch is actually a neutral and not romex that's not properly color coded on a switch leg?

          didn't read your post 100%, but find it hard to believe the shed manufacturer makes this mistake on all his products.

          rick.
          I'm kind of confused by your response. A neutral doesn't go to the switch. There is the switch leg and the constant hot going to the switch. I don't know if it was just the guy who did my shed or what. The load side of the GFI still had the yellow warning sticker on it.
          Last edited by fronty; 04-26-2007, 05:05 PM.

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          • #6
            Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

            The shed is wired to code. NEC 210.8 A 2 exception No. 2 lets you have a outlet that is not GFCI for up to two appliances that normal are not moved (i.e. refrigerator drill press, table saw. So fill up a refrigerator full of beer and don't worry that a GFCI trip will leave you with warm brew. Use the other outlet (GFCI) for run your weed wacker out in the rain.

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            • #7
              Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

              Here are 2 options. You had to run a "feed" to the shed. There you have a black (hot) white (nuetral) and a ground. The 2 options are this. Run the feed to the LINE side of the GFI first. On the load side of the GFI using the balck and white on the load side, run a wire to the second outlet. Now both outlets are GFI protected. You have an option to GFI the light system or not. If you do not want to GFI the light system, go back to the line (feed) and pick up the power (balck and white) for your light system, If you DO want to GFI the light system then pig tail off the load side of the GFI. Either way is fine. BUT you shoudl GFI both outlets in the shed unless one is for a fridge ONLY!. Lou

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              • #8
                Re: Bought premaid shed/ wiring wrong

                The Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter protection for personnel is not written to be that inclusive, it is to prevent electricity and water and humans from forming a circuit. Fixed appliances like drill presses, lights, compressors are not hazards. Receptacles that are readily accessible require a GFCI because people plug in cords and drop the electric hedge trimmer in mud puddles. If you are the type that would stand in a flooded shed an run a drill press, yes a GFCI on all outlets would be good. I can not think of any reason to put the lighting on a GFCI (waist deep in water and changing the light bulb?) Safety can be taken to the extreme, would it be safer to GFCI everything? No because a few false trips and they get removed. GFCI are not perfect and use common sense when using electricity, do not depend on a cheap device to keep safe. Not long ago fake GFCI's from China were recalled, they looked like GFCI's had fake UL listings but were just cheap recepticals inside.
                Chuck

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