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  • #16
    Re: Adding a 220 volt outlet in garage

    Originally posted by boytyperanma View Post
    For the connector what I would do is strip three feet of the end of your romex.(outer coating) attach a romex nut style connector. Take the nut off. punch out the correct size knock out. Snake from the panel to your outlet hole. attach the wire to the snake and pull the connector into place slide the nut down the wire and thread it onto the connector.
    Sounds like what I exactly need to do. There are several knock outs still available in the bottom of the breaker box. I checked out the connector styles in Lowes today to get a better feel for how the parts will all come together.

    Originally posted by boytyperanma View Post
    The hole in the bottom still looks like a conduit to me are you sure there isn't a box of some type in the basement or what-not that those wires go through.
    It is a rare house that has a basement in Vegas. I don't remember if there is a conduit under the box or not. I could dig up the pics I took during construction of the wiring runs, but I don't see the need.

    Originally posted by boytyperanma View Post
    I am not a lawyer. I'd say after 7 1/2 years any hope of going after the contractor is a lost cause. Unless the negligence causes catastrophic damage or a death the legal fees will out way any potential benifit
    When I was at Lowes, I explained my situation to one the employees (a retired electrician from what I could determine). He offered to cut off a couple of inches of both 10 gauge and 8 gauge wire so I could compare them to what is installed on the 50 amp circuit. When I returned home I could clearly see the wire on the 50 amp breakers is 8 gauge, and not 10 gauge. The 30 amp circuit has 6 gauge (aluminum?, the wires are silver) on it which is why the photos I put up here make it hard to judge the gauge. So, thankfully, no attorneys are going to be required.

    I am going to finish the router table insert for my TS3650 and then tackle this project next. I want to express my gratitude to wbrooks and everyone else for their concern about the gauge of wire used on the 50 amp circuit and for their suggestions of how to go about adding a 220 volt outlet.

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    • #17
      Re: Adding a 220 volt outlet in garage

      I don't think the photo shows the main breaker clearly , because a panel without a main wouln't hold that many breakers . If it doesn't , definenently ,don't add any more breakers . If you can put the 12/3 roamex in conduit that would be great , however if any is exposed to sunlight or damp areas (not inside wall ) make sure the wire is rated correctly .
      Some 220 appliances call for a neautral also (4-prong plugs )
      A ballanced load where two hots of different poles ,with the same current. share the same neautral , there should be no current on that neautral , and would also be more effecient . However , two or more hots of the same pole share the same neautral ,then there would be an unballanced load ,more current on the neautral , more heat . That along with loose connections can cause the white wire to burn at the neautral buss . If you suspect a problem , look for discolloration at the end , next to the neautral buss ,feel for higher temperatures or get an amp probe .

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      • #18
        Re: Adding a 220 volt outlet in garage

        Originally posted by VegasGuy View Post
        When I was at Lowes, I explained my situation to one the employees (a retired electrician from what I could determine). He offered to cut off a couple of inches of both 10 gauge and 8 gauge wire so I could compare them to what is installed on the 50 amp circuit. When I returned home I could clearly see the wire on the 50 amp breakers is 8 gauge, and not 10 gauge. The 30 amp circuit has 6 gauge (aluminum?, the wires are silver) on it which is why the photos I put up here make it hard to judge the gauge. So, thankfully, no attorneys are going to be required.
        Glad to hear you are good on the wire size. I would love to hear why the electrician used 6AWG aluminum for both AC units, never been a fan of aluminum wire but thats another story. Aluminum is fine as long as the proper aluminum rated connectors and anti corrosion compound are used.

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        • #19
          Re: Adding a 220 volt outlet in garage

          As I said in a previous post, I planned to tackle the 220 outlet once I finished making the router table insert for my 3650. While I was finishing up the insert, one of the neighbors came over to see what all the noise was. It was fortunate he came over because he had already added a 220 outlet in his garage. He told me to look at the back of the breaker box because I would find a slug. He said the slug was there because all our houses USED to have a 220 outlet in the garage, until the inspector made the builder remove them. He did not know why, but he even showed me the repair in the drywall where the outlet used to be. As it turned out, it was dead simple to run the wire and add the outlet. Between the help on this forum, and the additional information my neighbor provided, I was able to tackle this job with complete confidence and finished it in about 1/2 hour.

          Thanks to all who contributed to this thread!
          -Ike

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          • #20
            Re: Adding a 220 volt outlet in garage

            Originally posted by VegasGuy View Post
            He did not know why, but he even showed me the repair in the drywall where the outlet used to be.
            Probably because it wasn't GFCI protected so the inspector frowned on it, it being in a garage an all.

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