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Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

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  • #16
    Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

    Close but not quite

    The old wild receptacle I have with 2 T slots isn't any NEMA configuration. It's from way long ago and was made as a "one does many" in a dangerous way. It will take several types of plugs, but I took it out of use long ago and replaced it. I really should smash it up and trash it to prevent someone from getting hurt.

    Getting back to the name of this thread, I'm going to have to get busy and find more info. I do remember seeing in wiring device catalogs some time back where they had special 20A receptacles for both 125 and 250 Volt ratings for Canada. My bet is that's changed now.

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    • #17
      Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

      Please see page 6 of this PDF document. As several have stated earlier the ban or restriction was that a connector or receptacle must be designed to only accept one type of plug. In addition I have read, but need to try to obtain more info that Canadian code doesn't allow the use of receptacles on any given circuit other than for what both wiring and over current protection devices are designed for. An example would be that on a 15A 120V circuit you may only use 15A receptacles and on a 20A circuit only 20A receptacles my be used. This makes good sense with relations to safety.

      http://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/S...NRML_R0_EN.pdf

      I'm hoping someone can/will post from the CSA code on this. I'm working on it and will post if I find more valuable info. If not, then I really shouldn't have started this thread at all.

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      • #18
        Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

        You are correct that it was against the CSA code back as late as 1994. I remember this because I bought a 120V 20A welder and could only get single receptacles for it. I had wired the garage with 20A circuits and could only get 20A or 15 amp receptacles for 120. When I was in Boulder CO for a course around that time I went into a hardware type store to kill some time after class and found the NEMA 5-20R, bought 5 and installed them in my garage. The are common items now and not against code, not exactly sure of the year that the code changed.
        I also agree that the breaker is only there to protect the wire connected to it, the device plugged in must have it's own protection to limit it's draw

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        • #19
          Re: Why Was This Banned In Canada ?

          Wayne was good enough to post that things have changed and thus this thread should have been called Why Was This Banned In Canada rather than Why Is.

          Thanks Wayne

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          • #20
            Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

            dick, i don't think u need 2 bust the myth. i do believe u hit the nail on the head. at least where i come from u did.

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            • #21
              Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

              Here are the rules in Ontario Canada:

              For reference purposes I am quoting from "Electrical Code Simplified" Based on the 23rd Edition of the Ontario Electrical Safety Code. published in 2002. And that's Ontario, Canada, just to be clear. Here is what it reads on page 99:

              "The T-Slot receptacle is the newest member of the family. These will take both the 15 amp parallel blade attachment cap and the 20 amp right angle blade, they are interchangeable now. The T-Slot receptacle must be wired with 20 amp wire and 20 amp breaker at 120 volts."

              That's what our code says and as Dick pointed out earlier in this thread, the coordination between the breaker size and the wire gauge used in the circuit is to ensure that the house wiring does not burn up. It is not meant to, nor can it, prevent the user from doing somethings dangerous. For example, if you plug in table saw or a planner into a 15A circuit using an extension cord suitable for a lamp you will overheat that cord and risk shock or fire. This scenario is arguably no more dangerous on a circuit was designed for 20A.

              I am not an electrician so what's I've said, aside from the quotation, is my interpretation. It would be nice to see some of the electricians in the forum give us their two cents to make sure we are not getting off track.

              Andrew
              Last edited by athuswal; 10-28-2007, 03:03 PM.

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