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Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

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  • Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

    Please see the picture of a duplex receptacle that while very much allowed here in the USA is not allowed in Canada. Why do you think the CSA doesn't allow this type? I'm hoping several good replies will come in soon. There's a good reason why the USA needs to make changes which would not allow them for any new work. The NEMA configuration for this is 5-20R in case you need it. Rating is 20A 125V

    If no one posts the correct answer soon, then I'll post it. There's a very good reason behind why this wiring device should not be allowed or that it needs a rating change.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Woussko; 09-14-2007, 11:51 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

    http://ecmweb.com/mag/electric_basic...ted_grounding/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

      Originally posted by Woussko View Post
      Please see the picture of a duplex receptacle that while very much allowed here in the USA is not allowed in Canada. Why do you think the CSA doesn't allow this type? I'm hoping several good replies will come in soon. There's a good reason why the USA needs to make changes which would not allow them for any new work. The NEMA configuration for this is 5-20R in case you need it. Rating is 20A 125V


      If no one posts the correct answer soon, then I'll post it. There's a very good reason behind why this wiring device should not be allowed or that it needs a rating change.
      Because it looks too much like a 6-20R receptacle ?
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

        woops, I was thinking of something else - it's because that configuration allows a 15A device to be plugged into a 20A receptacle. The slots will accept both. In Canada, that's not allowed in the code.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

          Sceeter has the answer correct. The same applies to our 6-20 receptacles and connectors. They are 20A 250V rated but you can plug in 6-15 plugs which are rated 15A 250V into them. It's the T slots that they don't allow in Canada. Their code says that only one type of plug can fit into a given receptacle or connector.

          When I find good pictures of the Canadian receptacles, I'll try to post them in this thread. I've seen them, but don't have any to get good pics of just now.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

            the local electrical supply company sells the 20 Amp T slots here in where I live. they had actually suggested to me that I wire my garage with no 12awg wire and put these t slots in place with 20amp breakers.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

              I'm not sure i understand, though i am not an electrician.

              I live in canada (house new build 2003), and I have some 20A receptacles in my kitchen that I plug 15A devices into all the time. They have T slots.

              Also I have 2 20A receptacles in my garage (GFCI) for tools thay i run 15A devices off of.

              What gives?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                I was told by an electrician that because you need gfci if within so many feet of a sink. and because they don't make split gfi receptacles they are now using 20 amp t slot gfi in kitchens

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                  Hmmmm

                  Maybe some or all of Canada changed the codes so that our USA NEMA devices can be used now. I still think it's bad news. If you have a 20 Amp fuse or breaker and can plug in a light duty power cord and something goes wrong we all know what's happening. Fireworks

                  Maybe I'm too crazy but I really do want it so only one type of plug fits into a given receptacle or connector. I think that NEMA needs some updating and especially with the configurations for RV use.
                  Last edited by Woussko; 09-16-2007, 04:47 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                    I'm not an electrician, or electrical engineer (a retired mechanical engineer), but I have been told by several senior electrical engineers that circuit breakers are not there to protect the load (appliance, motor, electronics, etc.), but to protect the wiring. If that is true, then having a 15 amp rated device (coffee pot...) plugged into a 20 amp outlet would not be putting the wiring at risk.

                    My experience with electrical equipment (mostly high power motors and their solid state controllers) suggests that circuit breakers won't save a device that is experiencing a fault, but they will keep the wiring from burning up.

                    The idea that circuity breakers (or fuses) are there to protect the load may be an urban legend. Myth Busters where are you?
                    Dick

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Why Is (was) This Banned In Canada?

                      True about the fuse or circuit breaker being selected to protect wiring and not the device.

                      In some cases a fused safety switch may have fuses that are for added motor protection.
                      Last edited by Woussko; 09-16-2007, 04:48 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                        I don't get it. 15A devices are used in receptacles with 20A breakers/12g in a lot of places. The standard 15A 5-15 is rated for 20A pass through and is commonly used on a 20A breakers so its irrelevan't if it has the t slot or no. Functionally its the same thing as having a 5-20. The breaker is designed to protect the wiring. Its up to the device to have its own internal fuse or breaker. The reason you wouldn't wan't to have one of those receptacles is that if you will indeed run a 20A device then you need a single dedicated 20A receptacle and breaker. Having multiple of those standard T slot receptacles on a single breaker means once you plug in a single 20A device, it will start tripping the breaker if you try to run anything in one of the other receptables on that line.
                        Last edited by Velosapien; 09-16-2007, 01:25 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                          I looked up some info on this and it looks like the reason its not allowed in canada is that code there doesn't allow for any receptacle to take more than one kind of plug. Doesn't seem to have anything to do with the actual functionality of the 5-20 design.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                            I really think that Velosapien has it right. The idea was that only one type of plug was to be used with a given type of connector or receptacle. I'm going to research this more and find out what really gives. I also have a good feeling that the CSA codes may have been changed. I should have called this thread "Why was this banned" rather than "Why is this banned" in Canada.

                            I happen to have a very old oddball receptacle (USA made) with two T slots but no grounding. I can only guess why it was made and that doesn't go over very well. No way do I want to use it today.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Why Is This Banned In Canada ?

                              That might be some old nema 2 type I think. Many of those haven't been around for a while.

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