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  • Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

    Hi I need basic 101 answer. I want to by an electric heater for garage. It says it takes 240 volt. Its a dayton heater.
    I can do two things. One is take outlet from my dryer and plug in heater there. Since my dryer runs off 110 or I can run a new 220v plug to it.
    Is 240 volt something totally different?
    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

    220 volt is the same difference as 240,

    In some areas of the county it is 220 and some areas it can be 240, It is the same as saying 110 or 120 volts, in our area it is 117 volts, and 234 volts.
    I am under the impression the newer installations are running more in the 120/240 range, if your voltage is above 120/240 or below 110/220 then your operating out of normal voltages.

    as far as the heater, you will need to size the wire and breaker to the amps,

    I am not familiar with a dryer that runs on 110 volts, (clothes dryer).

    If the amps and such and (if it is a typo on the dryer, it is 220/240 volts) I can see no reason you could not use the outlet, for the heater.
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

      Originally posted by BHD View Post
      I am not familiar with a dryer that runs on 110 volts, (clothes dryer).
      They could have a gas dryer

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

        Woody,

        I agree with BHD... 120/240, 110/220, etc. are pretty much "nominal" terms used regionally, by either description or in actuality. My voltage here is running 117.4 volts which would make for 234.8 volts. I suspect voltage will vary to some degree from neighborhood to neighborhood and even by times of day depending on usage.

        CWS

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

          Originally posted by boytyperanma View Post
          They could have a gas dryer
          Correct. Thanks

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

            Originally posted by BHD View Post
            220 volt is the same difference as 240,

            In some areas of the county it is 220 and some areas it can be 240, It is the same as saying 110 or 120 volts, in our area it is 117 volts, and 234 volts.
            I am under the impression the newer installations are running more in the 120/240 range, if your voltage is above 120/240 or below 110/220 then your operating out of normal voltages.

            as far as the heater, you will need to size the wire and breaker to the amps,

            I am not familiar with a dryer that runs on 110 volts, (clothes dryer).

            If the amps and such and (if it is a typo on the dryer, it is 220/240 volts) I can see no reason you could not use the outlet, for the heater.
            Thanks for that info. Its on a 30 amp circuit I know. I was thinking of getting Nothern Tools Supply heatere here .. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...t_6970_595_595
            I have a neighbor friend who is going to help with the electrical questions I have here.
            Thanks again

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

              sorry for some reason a gas dryer never crossed my mind since we were talking electricity, LOL.

              you will probly need to run a new line so you have 240 volts instead of 120 volts that the dryer is currently using, but that is a guess, as I do know exactly what you have or dealing with.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              Added after looking at the listed web page:

              and that type looks like a hard wire unit to me, (or a permanently wired in).

              from spec, sheet,
              Power Cord (ft.): Must be hardwired
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                If you do have a 30A 240V unused dryer receptacle you could give this portable heater a try. It puts out way more heat than a 1500 Watt 120 Volt model and it doesn't cost all that much. You may have to change the dryer receptacle, but that shouldn't be too hard.

                Link removed as it was not to the correct heater but rather a junker. I goofed. Please see later posts.

                The heater you picked is better quality, but it needs to be properly wired up. One advantage to the portable is that heat rises and floors are where it's cold. You might like to be able to have heat blowing closer to the floor. Do be sure to keep the area clean and be sure not to block or have anything near a heater that might catch on fire.
                Last edited by Woussko; 10-08-2007, 12:38 AM. Reason: I messed things up

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                  Portable heaters can be legally plugged in too.A non portable heater tho its illegal to just plug it into an existing outlet.
                  Sam

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                    Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                    If you do have a 30A 240V unused dryer receptacle you could give this portable heater a try. It puts out way more heat than a 1500 Watt 120 Volt model and it doesn't cost all that much. You may have to change the dryer receptacle, but that shouldn't be too hard.
                    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...7929_200307929

                    The heater you picked is batter quality, but it needs to be properly wired up. One advantage to the portable is that heat rises and floors are where it's cold. You might like to be able to have heat blowing closer to the floor. Do be sure to keep the area clean and be sure not to block or have anything near a heater that might catch on fire.
                    First please know I appreciate all of you chiming in and helping me out. I now understand the hard wire meaning. I think I may go this route Wouskko http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...70_21340_21340 after reading reviews of the one you posted. Plus its well within my range.

                    Thanks again

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                      Woody

                      I didn't see the one you picked but did check it out just now. It is a better heater than the one I had posted about.

                      When people say "hard wired" they mean to wire directly into the device as in a permanent installation. The cord & plug portables come in handy when you want to move them. If you know an electrician it might be an idea to have the correct receptacle and circuit breaker for your heater installed in your basement. Sometimes extra heat comes in very nice in a cold basement when you need to work down there. Be sure to check for the proper receptacle type once you get the heater. As best as I can tell the orange (Marley-Fahrenheat) model needs a 6-20 receptacle which will be rated 20 Amp 250 Volts. These are smaller in size than the 30 Amp dryer receptacles are. You can leave the wiring and circuit breaker as the are, but be sure of proper grounding.

                      This .PDF file will give you more info on the orange-red heater you picked.
                      http://www.qmarkmep.com/develop/prod.../ZBL-FBRHO.pdf


                      With regard to Voltage, most devices have a design Voltage and can operate without damage over a range of about plus 5% above down to about minus 10% below the design value.

                      If you were to measure the Voltage at a given receptacle or at your service entrance, you would find it to very depending on the load and also on loads in your local area.
                      Last edited by Woussko; 10-08-2007, 12:54 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                        depending on the size and the insulation of your shop area,
                        13,650 BTU is not that much, in fact it is very small, most home furnaces are in the 60,000 to 100,000 BTU for a 1200 square foot home, depending on the efficiency of the furnace,
                        Many garages are not well insulated, I have seen many that have NO insulation (cost cutting measure when building), and even a single car building being the 400 to 500 square foot area, a double car many times is in the Nealy 1000 sq foot, and with roll up doors unless there the good insulated units, your going to need more heat out put IMO. (your location is Seattle so you don't deal with extreme cold but I would question if a 14,000 BTU unit is large enough to do you much good, besides jsut a hand warmer, I know in my area that is all it would be good for, I have a 80,000 BTU gas furnace in my wood shop and it is 24x30 wood frame building with roof insulated, and when it is cold out, freezing and below it runs a lot to keep up, it will take it from below freezing to workable temperatures in an hr or so, but a even a 20,000 BTU heater would never keep up in my situation, my dad tried it.
                        Now I know your not dealing with the extremes I deal with but you may want some thing bigger a lot bigger. I would think that little heater might be be good for a small 10'x12' storage shed type building (depending on insulation) and that is about all, MY opinion,

                        with out doing a heat loss calculations and knowing the size and construction of the building , I would guess if you really want to heat it, you would need two of 5000 watt or even the 7500 watt the permanent hanging units to do the job to your desired satisfaction, my guess is you would need at lest 40,000 BTU to do it near right if it a double car size and depending on insulation that may be minimal. If it is single car unit may be one of them would do you OK

                        and even that 13,650 but heater if it is pulling a full 20 amps you would want it on a 30 amp circuit with the correct wiring. It more than likely would be popping the breaker on a 20 amp circuit after running for a few Min's.

                        Just My Opinion
                        Last edited by BHD; 10-08-2007, 11:11 AM.
                        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                        attributed to Samuel Johnson
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                          Originally posted by BHD View Post
                          depending on the size and the insulation of your shop area,
                          13,650 BTU is not that much, in fact it is very small, most home furnaces are in the 60,000 to 100,000 BTU for a 1200 square foot home, depending on the efficiency of the furnace,
                          Many garages are not well insulated, I have seen many that have NO insulation (cost cutting measure when building), and even a single car building being the 400 to 500 square foot area, a double car many times is in the Nealy 1000 sq foot, and with roll up doors unless there the good insulated units, your going to need more heat out put IMO. (your location is Seattle so you don't deal with extreme cold but I would question if a 14,000 BTU unit is large enough to do you much good, besides jsut a hand warmer, I know in my area that is all it would be good for, I have a 80,000 BTU gas furnace in my wood shop and it is 24x30 wood frame building with roof insulated, and when it is cold out, freezing and below it runs a lot to keep up, it will take it from below freezing to workable temperatures in an hr or so, but a even a 20,000 BTU heater would never keep up in my situation, my dad tried it.
                          Now I know your not dealing with the extremes I deal with but you may want some thing bigger a lot bigger. I would think that little heater might be be good for a small 10'x12' storage shed type building (depending on insulation) and that is about all, MY opinion,

                          with out doing a heat loss calculations and knowing the size and construction of the building , I would guess if you really want to heat it, you would need two of 5000 watt or even the 7500 watt the permanent hanging units to do the job to your desired satisfaction, my guess is you would need at lest 40,000 BTU to do it near right if it a double car size and depending on insulation that may be minimal. If it is single car unit may be one of them would do you OK

                          and even that 13,650 but heater if it is pulling a full 20 amps you would want it on a 30 amp circuit with the correct wiring. It more than likely would be popping the breaker on a 20 amp circuit after running for a few Min's.

                          Just My Opinion
                          Hmm, its quite contradiciting from what I have read on this forum and another on sizes that have worked for people, my garage is insualted except 3 doors..My garage never gets below 35 maybe even 40 and all I want is 60-65 if thats max I can get.
                          Thanks for the info also.Appreciated.
                          Last edited by Woodywoodchuck; 10-08-2007, 11:18 AM. Reason: addition

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                            You sound a lot better insulated than I expected, but I think I would still step up to the larger 5000 watt unit over the smaller unit,
                            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                            attributed to Samuel Johnson
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Easy question 220 volt 240 volt

                              For what this is worth you want to design a circuit where the load is on for long times so that the load isn't greater than 80% of the circuit rating. Examples would be 12 Amps on a 15 Amp circuit, 16 on a 20 and 24 on a 30. Figuring that the heater is designed for 240 Volts, that would give max Wattages of 2880, 3480, and 5760.

                              In your garage do you currently have a sub-panel? If yes, what is the rating of the breaker feeding it? It might pay to setup for 2 heaters and only use one during mild weather with the other as a booster. Maybe just buy one heater, but plan on another if needed. - Just my 1 cent worth here

                              No matter what you end up with for a heater be sure to keep it away from anything that can catch on fire and also keep the heater clean. Use your shop vac to suck dust and dirt out of it and then blow it in reverse to remove sawdust and such.

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