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  • I need sparky help

    There is a heated discussion in another forum I frequent about running romex in conduit. The concensus is split down the middle on if it is against the NEC. No one has been able to post proof positive either way. I am on the it should not be done side. Can one of you in here post someting either way with the wording fro the NEC?
    SSG, U.S. Army
    Retired
    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

  • #2
    Re: I need sparky help

    I am not an electrician, but when i asked the inspector in my area (ontario, canada) it was a no-no to run romex in conduit. I had to run individual wire in steel conduit for an indoor garage circuit.

    Do a search here on the ridgid forum, we had quite a discussion about it too and lots of great info came ot of it.

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    • #3
      Re: I need sparky help

      I believe this is the discussion you refer to:

      http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...?t=9481&page=2

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      • #4
        Re: I need sparky help

        What are the reasons for doing this?

        Pulling ROMEX through conduit would be twice the labor, vs THHN or similiar conductors.

        The only reason I would do this, is if I had several enclosures with control devices and was using short nipples to connect and then only to avoid running to the supply house for spools of wire.

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        • #5
          Re: I need sparky help

          I believe the reasoning the inspectors use is not using the Romex the way it is intended to be used. Romex is designed to be used without being confined by being inside of a metal or PVC conduit and the outer jacket of the romex is the the conduit for the wires. It would be like putting a 1/2 inch conduit with wires enclosed inside a 3/4 in conduit. Also there is a maximum fill of the inside area of a conduit that is allowed before having downgrade the current carrying capacities of the wire. The outer jacket of the Romex would eat that up pretty fast.

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          • #6
            Re: I need sparky help

            here in north carolina the only place we can use "romex" in emt....pvc....liquid tite flex...or any other type of "raceway" is if it is not connected on both ends for example to shield the wire down a block wall in a basement

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            • #7
              Re: I need sparky help

              Dont hold me to it, but I believe it has to with the "thermodynamics" heat transfer.

              REgards,

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              • #8
                Re: I need sparky help

                I too believe it can't be done here in Ontario. I think it's because of the jacket rating & flammability during a fire. Toxic stuff & all that...

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                • #9
                  Re: I need sparky help

                  2008 NEC 334.15 (B) and (C) also 334.30, these are the references you seek.
                  Chuck

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                  • #10
                    Re: I need sparky help

                    so, whats your guys take on this? Lets say you are running wires for a hot tub. The panel is on the other side of the house, but it is a truss system floor. You run Romex through the trusses (fished as the ceiling is finished) to the outside wall. Out side it then enters into PVC on the way to the tub. Now, so you dont have to splice it, could you then strip off the casing at the point it reaches the PVC and fish it through the PVC? from the point it enters the PVC back to the panel is still encased in the casing, but from the flush mount box on the wall through the PVC to the tub is now "shelled" and no longer in the outer casing of the romex?

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                    • #11
                      Re: I need sparky help

                      Originally posted by drsparky View Post
                      2008 NEC 334.15 (B) and (C) also 334.30, these are the references you seek.
                      Chuck
                      I believe without actually looking it up, all three of those sections are only related to physical protection. I don't recall ever actually seeing it in the codebook stating you can't run it in conduit.

                      Jeff

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                      • #12
                        Re: I need sparky help

                        Look at the conduit articles, for instance 352.22 (2005 NEC) for type RNC. Cables can be installed in conduit unless the cable article says otherwise, and Article 334 for NM cable doesn't prohibit running it in conduit. Note that type NM cable cannot be used outdoors, even if it's inside a conduit. Stripping the outer jacket off and and using the individual wires is neither required nor permitted by the NEC. The individual wires are not marked as required by 310.11.

                        For conduit-fill purposes, use the major diameter of an elliptical-shaped cable as if it were the diameter of a single circular conductor, per Note 9, Table 1, Chapter 9. This does not apply to short sections of conduit used for protection.

                        As I recall, there was some confusion between two NEC code-making panels in an earlier edition of the NEC. This resulted in a code that could be interpreted as prohibiting the use of cable in conduit, although the CMP's did not intend to do so.
                        Last edited by Matsukaze; 05-04-2008, 02:54 PM.

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