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  • workshop wiring

    Can I have a circuit with 12awg wire that serves two plug outlets, one is a L6-20 (220V@20A) and the other is a 6-15R (220V@15A). The machines plugged into these outlets would never be on at the same time. And could I at some later date change them both to L6-20 outlets?

    thanks, Andrew

  • #2
    Re: workshop wiring

    Not trying to be a smarta*s, but you are the electrical engineer so you tell me. I also see you are from Canada and I dont have any idea what code you are under.

    On the other hand, I dont see why you could not have both since you have 12 gauge wire!

    I am sure others will chime in here.

    Regards,
    Last edited by biscuit; 01-14-2008, 02:09 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: workshop wiring

      But in a similar vein I wouldn't necessarily expect you to know how to fix my car engine or install my furnace.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: workshop wiring

        True, I guess I was being a smarta*s.

        I do believe we have an electrician who frequents this place from Canada and maybe he will chime in.

        Regards,

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: workshop wiring

          Originally posted by athuswal View Post
          Can I have a circuit with 12awg wire that serves two plug outlets, one is a L6-20 (220V@20A) and the other is a 6-15R (220V@15A). The machines plugged into these outlets would never be on at the same time. And could I at some later date change them both to L6-20 outlets?

          thanks, Andrew
          You would need to use a 2pole 15a CB to make it code.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: workshop wiring

            I'm not sure about the codes in Canada, but I can't see anything wrong with connecting more than one receptacle on the same circuit. I would recommend going for a 6-20 rather than 6-15 as the ones sold here in the USA have a T slot so you can use them with either a 6-15 or 6-20 plug. For #12 copper wire you would want a 2 pole 20 Amp circuit breaker. The circuit breaker is to protect the wiring and not the wiring devices or what's plugged into them. If something you are plugging in states it needs to be used on a circuit protected by 15 Amp fuses or circuit breaker, then you should use a 15 Amp breaker.

            At one time I remember Canada was fussy and demanded that 15 Amp wiring devices never be used on a circuit protected by a 20 or 30 Amp circuit breaker or fuse. They also banned T slot receptacles and connectors. From what I've read they changed over to closer to the USA codes which allow them.

            Addition to post: If the device with a L6-20 plug on the power cord doesn't draw over 12 Amps (if lights or heater that will be left on or no more than 15 Amps running Amps if a motor load) then you could wire up the 2 receptacles using #12 wire but use a 2 pole 15 Amp circuit breaker for now. You will only be able to run one device at a time. Later on you could go for 2 circuits and either (1) 2 pole 15 Amp and (1) 2 pole 20 Amp breaker or maybe both could have 15 Amp 2 pole breakers. Look in the instructions of what you plan to power.

            Please post more info about what you are powering and some specs if you can.
            Last edited by Woussko; 01-16-2008, 05:27 PM.

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            • #7
              Re: workshop wiring

              You can do it, but personally I wouldn't. It would all work fine, and probably would never be a problem. The real problem comes if anything ever did happen. The manufacturer of the equipment put the 15 and 20 amp cord ends on for a reason. If something should happen and you have the 15 amp device on a 20 amp circuit, your insurance company has a reason to deny your claim.

              Again, likely nothing would happen under normal circumstances, but if they do, thats when the real problem could start.

              Jeff

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              • #8
                Re: workshop wiring

                Ya see what happens when you have more than one engineer on a project?




                Easy guys, just trying to lighten it up a bit.
                ---------------
                Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                ---------------
                “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                ---------
                "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                ---------
                sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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                • #9
                  Re: workshop wiring

                  I think the Ontario hydro code will call for a 15a breaker if you use a 15a receptacle.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: workshop wiring

                    Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                    Ya see what happens when you have more than one engineer on a project?




                    Easy guys, just trying to lighten it up a bit.
                    They should be able to change a light blub between the three of them.
                    SSG, U.S. Army
                    Retired
                    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: workshop wiring

                      They changed the Ontario Hydro Code so that you are now allowed to use #12 copper wire and a 20a T slot receptacle with a 20a CB. You still cannot protect a 15a rated receptacle with a 20a circuit breaker and pass the code requirements.
                      In the USA can you protect 15a receptacles with 20a breakers and pass code?

                      You have light bulbs in Arkansas?

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                      • #12
                        Re: workshop wiring

                        Originally posted by bluecon View Post
                        In the USA can you protect 15a receptacles with 20a breakers and pass code?
                        As far as I'm aware, yes it's actually pretty common practice and allowed in most places. 15A receptacles are rated for 20A pass through.

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