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  • Power feeder

    I need to run a 400 amp power feeder on my property for a new house. I have to run the wiring 1500 feet. What size wire should I be using?

  • #2
    Re: Power feeder

    Figuring for voltage drop with aluminum wire you are going to need 700kcmil. That is going to be a pricey and big conductor.

    Jeff

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    • #3
      Re: Power feeder

      Jeff,
      Excuse my ignorance, I, only familar with #2, O, OO, OOO. what size is 700kcmil?

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      • #4
        Re: Power feeder

        Basically you have, as you said (this will be small to big) #2, #1, 1/0, 2/0/, 3/0, 4/0 (at this point conductor sizes switch to what is known as kcmils, formerly known as MCM), then it's 250, 300, 350, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and so on. 700Kcmils are huge and expensive. You probably would be better off doing a parralled installation using (2) 350 kcmils for each phase and then down sizing the nuetral. Parralling though is tricky business in itself. The conductors of each phase have to be exactly the same length and material, and they would need to be run in two seperate conduits, each conduit containing one set of each conductor, meaning one A phase, one B phase and one nuetral in each conduit.

        Jeff

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        • #5
          Re: Power feeder

          If there's a way to do it, run the high Voltage closer to the building and have your electric power company install a transformer either on a pole or in many cases they install them in a weather housing at ground level on a small concrete pad. By not having so long of a run at 120/240 Volts you won't need so many feet of large and costly wire. A friend I know has a 150 acre farm and it's about 2000 feet from the road into his all electric house. He needed 400 Amp 120/240 single phase service. The electric company ran in 13,200 Volt underground feeder lines and installed a transformer about 25 feet from the house in the yard. He had to have the ditch dug for them and also do the filling with sand, then gravel and finally small rocks and dirt. Try talking to your electric utility company and also to a good electrical contractor in your area. This is far more than a DIY job. The reels of wire get very heavy and you need special connectors and tools to work with it.

          Depending on where you're located and what your codes say about overhead service it would in most cases be far less costly to errect wood utility poles and do an overhead installation with the transformer(s) on a pole closer to the house or building.

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          • #6
            Re: Power feeder

            Circular Mill: The area of a circle having a diameter of 1 mil (1/1,000 in.); used in specifying wire size; equals an area of 0.00051 sq

            The M (Roman numeral) now a K (Kilo) = 1000

            500 KCM wire would be 0.255 square inches.
            Last edited by Woussko; 01-28-2008, 04:17 AM.

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            • #7
              Re: Power feeder

              1500 ft is a long run. If you consider voltage drop, allowing a max of 5%, you'd have to parallel aluminum 1250 kcmil wire. Me personally I don't run anything underground not in pipe, direct burial wire or not. Ever megger out direct burial conductors that have been in the ground for 10 or 15 years?

              It'd be waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more cost effective to have another service installed on the house. Let the power company do the dirty work .

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              • #8
                Re: Power feeder

                Originally posted by GilBeQuick View Post
                1500 ft is a long run. If you consider voltage drop, allowing a max of 5%, you'd have to parallel aluminum 1250 kcmil wire.
                Wow, for the life of me I am trying to figure out where I came up with my 700kcmil doing the job and can't get that figure again. Somewhere I dropped a number in my original calculations. You are correct, actually it should be closer to 2800kcmil due to the code recommendation of 3% voltage drop on feeders. In that case he would be better off doing 4 runs of parralled 700's. Man that is going to cost a fortune. Plus the panel is going to be ridiculous to get it set up to accept 4-700's per phase.

                I do believe you have the best suggestion of having the utility company set another service for that one.

                Greasyrail is your power company Alliant? If so you can figure roughly $10 per linear foot or more to do it, which is still probably cheaper than doing it yourself. I know they charge $10 per foot to do a residential 200 amp underground, 400 is going to cost a bit more. The service laterals they run in are good for 320A on a typical service, so it is only one step up to go to a 400A. service.

                Jeff

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                • #9
                  Re: Power feeder

                  Hello there .,, sorry i did not get a chance to come in here often but anyway.,,


                  1500 foot that is pretty serious run there and for new home set up IMO it best to get ahold of POCO to run the service either overhead or underground and they will set up a transformer near your home typically 25~75 feet range depending on how it set up.

                  and this will be the best methold to do this.

                  Merci, Marc

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