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  • Radint floor heating and baseboards

    Is there a something in the code that prevents me from wiring a radiant floor heating with baseboards on the same breaker exept that i would have to change the breaker to a ground fault one.


    my existing circuit is (1000 watt baseboard + 1750 watt Baseboard + 2000 watt wall fan heater) hooked up to a 25 amp breaker
    i want to add a 518 watt radiant floor heating to this do i have problem ?

  • #2
    Re: Radint floor heating and baseboards

    What size circuit conductors are on that circuit? You would be at 5268 watts on one 240 volt circuit which would end up at a bit over 27 amps with continuous duty figured in. Your pushing it on a 30 amp breaker. You would absolutely need 10 ga wire.

    Other than needing GFCI protection which you already mentioned, I don't believe their are any other major restrictions on the use of electric heating cables in floors.

    Jeff

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    • #3
      Re: Radint floor heating and baseboards

      excuse my ignorance but how do you calculate the continuous duty
      tanks for the reply


      1000+1750+2000+(518)= 4368w/240v = 21.95amp
      how do you get to 27amps?

      either way i was to remove 2000w heater that i never use.
      tahnks for the reply

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Radint floor heating and baseboards

        Originally posted by kmankess View Post
        excuse my ignorance but how do you calculate the continuous duty
        tanks for the reply


        1000+1750+2000+(518)= 4368w/240v = 21.95amp
        how do you get to 27amps?

        either way i was to remove 2000w heater that i never use.
        tahnks for the reply
        First of all, if you add up everything you have there:

        1000 watts +
        1750 watts +
        2000 watts +
        518 watts =

        5268

        Then you divide that by 240 volts and get 21.95 amps. Now because this can run for more than three hours at any given time it needs to be considered continous duty. When something is continuous duty you multiply that by 125% or 1.25. So take the 21.95 multiply that by 1.25 and you get about 27.5 amps.

        Now if you were to remove the 2000 watt heater, this puts you at about 17 amps. You would have to make certain though that that 2000 watt heater is permanently removed or at a minimum this circuit could never be connected to it again if it is under 10 ga. wire.

        Jeff

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