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grounding vs bonding

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  • grounding vs bonding

    can anyone explain the difference to me?

  • #2
    Re: grounding vs bonding

    Hi Franklin,
    Here is a little something I pulled off the Internet which should explain it for you.


    Bonding and Grounding
    It is important to note that bonding and grounding are not the same. Bonding is the connection of two or more conductive objects to one another by means of a conductor such as a wire. Grounding, also referred to as “earthing”, is a specific form of bonding wherein one or more conductive objects are connected to the ground by means of a conductor such as a wire or rod. Thus, proper “grounding” of objects (conductors) in the field will normally incorporate both bonds between objects and a specific bond to the earth (ground).
    For example, when applying paint with an acetone carrier (Class IB Flammable Liquid) to a steel plate using a spray application system, proper grounding and bonding are required. The paint passing through the nozzle of the spray gun will generate a static charge and the acetone will cause flammable vapors to evolve into the area where the painting is being conducted. Thus, the spray gun must be bonded to the metal plate and the metal plate must be bonded to the ground (grounded) in order to prevent potential ignition of the flammable vapors generated by the acetone in the paint.
    From: http://www.trconsultinggroup.com/safety/nov2001.html


    In other words, grounding is your actual connection to ground (the earth). Bonding is joining together the various components from the ground wire to the ground bar to the service panel itself and ultimately to the ground wire headed to the driven ground rod.

    Hope that helps.

    (A lot of times, sparkies use the two interchangeably without taking into consideration the subtle difference that can mix up the average layman. A lot of times you'll also hear somebody refer to one of the 120 v legs of your three-wire coming into your house as a (phase). Then they refer to the other 120 v leg as the other phase, when in fact your house is powered by one-phase electrical consisting of two separate legs or lines of 120 volts each, for a total of 240 volts (not 220) coming into your house. The third wire coming into the house is a neutral (ground). Now are you thoroughly confused??? Yep. It'll confuse lots of people.)

    Jim Don

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    • #3
      Re: grounding vs bonding

      http://mikeholt.com/freevideo.php?id=GVB2005
      many graphics that have information on them
      http://mikeholt.com/freegraphics.php?id=gvb
      Last edited by BHD; 05-19-2008, 02:38 PM.
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      • #4
        Re: grounding vs bonding

        Originally posted by JimDon View Post
        (A lot of times, sparkies use the two interchangeably without taking into consideration the subtle difference that can mix up the average layman. A lot of times you'll also hear somebody refer to one of the 120 v legs of your three-wire coming into your house as a (phase). Then they refer to the other 120 v leg as the other phase, when in fact your house is powered by one-phase electrical consisting of two separate legs or lines of 120 volts each, for a total of 240 volts (not 220) coming into your house. The third wire coming into the house is a neutral (ground). Now are you thoroughly confused??? Yep. It'll confuse lots of people.)
        Jim Don
        Please don't assume that neutral is ever connected to earth ground. It should be at the point of service entrance, but please never assume that it is until checked out.

        Actually in a single phase 120/240 Volt system the neutral is a center point tap on the secondary winding of the transformer. From this tap to either end you get 120 Volts and from end to end 240.

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