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  • Need clarification

    I am running a circuit in my garage that will be overhead and used for 3 outlets for lighting. Since these are not reachable without a ladder, do I need to run the wiring through conduit?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Need clarification

    Originally posted by osgoor View Post
    I am running a circuit in my garage that will be overhead and used for 3 outlets for lighting. Since these are not reachable without a ladder, do I need to run the wiring through conduit?

    Thanks
    I'm not an electrician, so you should wait for one of them to answer. My understanding is that it will depend on the type of wire that you've run. For example, if you've run individual conductors I the answer is yes it needs to be in conduit. If you've run Romex it doesn't need to be in a conduit, but you can just staple it underneath joists, you need to drill them.

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    • #3
      Re: Need clarification

      there is nothing wrong with running romex to do this but you may want to check the code in your state

      you can run under ground wire it is a little tougher and if you hit it with some thing it will hold up better
      Charlie

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      • #4
        Re: Need clarification

        Hawk's got it pegged. Romex should be fine, but check with your local municipality on what they want. Some places have higher requirements, or different requirements. If you have any question about it being struck or damaged by anything, you could also run it inside BX or armored. It's flexible, relatively easy to work with and will protect it from anything short of a bomb. You could run the Romex along a wall stud to get up high, then run the Romex into a J-box, and exit the J-box with the BX to where you want it overhead so that nothing can get to it. The armor outside works as a ground, but most BX you buy nowadays has a separate ground wire inside the cable too. Use it to ground your boxes. Do not forget to put the plastic, anti-slice sleeves (inserts) into the BX at both ends of every piece. If you don't, it won't pass inspection, and the wire could be abraided by the sharp edges where you cut and snap the armor. Good Luck. Don't be afraid to ask something more if you didn't understand this ramble.
        Jim Don

        Don't forget to protect that circuit with GFCI receptacle. Outdoors, garages, wet/damp locations, basements, etc. require that they be GFCI protected.
        Last edited by JimDon; 05-30-2008, 09:37 AM. Reason: Added GFCI info.

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        • #5
          Re: Need clarification

          Ditto on checking the local codes, Here, the wiring has to be armored or in conduit if exposed. If behind paneling or sheet rock, romex is fine (Wiring in attics and crawl spaces are not considered exposed, but garages/car ports, and outside are.)

          It will be up to the AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction)

          Go
          Practicing at practical wood working

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          • #6
            Re: Need clarification

            Thanks for the replies all. I will check with the Minnesota/Minneapolis building codes.

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            • #7
              Re: Need clarification

              If there's a chance you'll hit the wiring with something that will cut into the jacket or if there's a chance rodents will chew the jacket on Romex, then you really should think about running conduit or using BX cable. Rats can bite right through Romex and so can the cute bushy tail rats. Because the DIY normally won't have a bender, you can buy ready formed 45 and 90 elbows and also pull boxes to use as needed if you get into conduit. BX can be a pain to work with if you aren't used to it. Do check your local codes. Something to think about is to use an Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter breaker for the garage circuits. That way if it is cut or bitten that can help prevent dangerous arcing and a fire. All receptacles should be the GFCI type. To use a GFCI breaker gets into too much $$$ as normally you don't want more than 3 on a given circuit in a garage.

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              • #8
                Re: Need clarification

                Osgoor,
                The NEC 2008 code changes take away ALL GFCI exemptions in garage circuitry so ALL receptacles (outlets) in a garage need to be protected with a GFCI outlet or GFCI breaker. Even overhead, high up outlets normally used for the garage door opener now have to be GFCI, the appliance outlet for the garage refrig or freezer have to be GFCI too, so don't forget this step. I take it you know how to install GFCIs correctly. First one in the circuit is attached with the two terminals that are for the line side, and all the other outlets (chained) are attached on the load side of the GFCI, that way all the outlets on that particular wire are GFCI protected even if it isn't an outlet with the test and reset buttons. Then the downstream outlets get the little blue tag that comes along in the box that says "GFCI Protected Circuit." Sorry for the ramble, if you need more info, don't be afraid to ask.
                Jim Don

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                • #9
                  Re: Need clarification

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  If there's a chance you'll hit the wiring with something that will cut into the jacket or if there's a chance rodents will chew the jacket on Romex, then you really should think about running conduit or using BX cable. Rats can bite right through Romex and so can the cute bushy tail rats. Because the DIY normally won't have a bender, you can buy ready formed 45 and 90 elbows and also pull boxes to use as needed if you get into conduit. BX can be a pain to work with if you aren't used to it. Do check your local codes. Something to think about is to use an Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter breaker for the garage circuits. That way if it is cut or bitten that can help prevent dangerous arcing and a fire. All receptacles should be the GFCI type. To use a GFCI breaker gets into too much $$$ as normally you don't want more than 3 on a given circuit in a garage.

                  The romex that I have already run in the walls is behind insulation and drywall. I did put plates on the front of each stud to protect the wiring that runs through them. I have a GFCI outlet at the beginning of each circuit run.

                  Thanks for the feedback....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Need clarification

                    Sounds like you got 'er scoped out. If you got rats inside your walls in Minnie after filling in with insulation and putting up rock, you got bigger problems than whether or not the GFCI's gonna trip on time. LOL.
                    Cheers,
                    Jim Don

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                    • #11
                      Re: Need clarification

                      Originally posted by JimDon View Post
                      Osgoor,
                      The NEC 2008 code changes take away ALL GFCI exemptions in garage circuitry so ALL receptacles (outlets) in a garage need to be protected with a GFCI outlet or GFCI breaker. Even overhead, high up outlets normally used for the garage door opener now have to be GFCI, the appliance outlet for the garage refrig or freezer have to be GFCI too, so don't forget this step. I take it you know how to install GFCIs correctly. First one in the circuit is attached with the two terminals that are for the line side, and all the other outlets (chained) are attached on the load side of the GFCI, that way all the outlets on that particular wire are GFCI protected even if it isn't an outlet with the test and reset buttons. Then the downstream outlets get the little blue tag that comes along in the box that says "GFCI Protected Circuit." Sorry for the ramble, if you need more info, don't be afraid to ask.
                      Jim Don
                      I haven't even really dug too much into the '08 book yet as we havent adopted it yet as you know, what you are saying about the garage receps being GFCI'd, can we still just put a single device recepticle in and avoid the GFCI? I would hope so, going to be lots of trouble putting freezers and such on GFCI's. I wouldn't want my opener on a GFCI either, if it trips while you are gone it isn't going to open up for you when you get back. Just seems like a lot of trouble waiting to happen if we can't just use single device recepticles.

                      Jeff

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