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  • Wire sizing.

    Running a subpanel to a detached building 90' away from main panel. Subpanel will be 50amps with three #6 copper conductors for the hot,hot,neutral. My question is what size copper wire do I need for the 4th ground wire? Is #10 ok for 50amps or do I need #8?

    Thanks,

    Mike
    WI

  • #2
    Re: Wire sizing.

    #10 should be fine as long as you are not putting a continuous high amperage load like snow melt equipment etc. on that feeder system. The link below is a conductor size calculator which may help you. New NEC code requires a seperate ground rod on the subpanel wired to the ground buss bar of the subpanel in addition to the ground from your main load center to the subpanel.

    http://www.electrician2.com/calculat...cpd_ver_1.html
    Last edited by killavolt; 02-09-2009, 10:33 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Wire sizing.

      Thanks for your response!

      So when using this calculator does one input the max continuous load expected and then take the breaker size minus the max continuous load to fill in the non-continuous load field on the calculator? Just want to make sure Im doing this right

      Mike

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      • #4
        Re: Wire sizing.

        Continuous load is only a factor if the machinery (the load) will be running continuously for 3 or more hours non-stop. If you're running plugs, lights and a welder occasionally you don't have a continuous load factor to worry about. If you have a continuous load, then figure your breaker amperage minus your continuous load to get your non-continuous load and size your wire appropriately. There is a voltage drop calculator at the bottom of the wire gauge calculator that might prove useful as well.

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