Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GFI's old michigan basement

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • GFI's old michigan basement

    I would like to ask if GFI's are required by code in existing old michigan basements would like to have a outlet in case i need to run a work light or shop vac.
    Thanks in advance

  • #2
    Re: GFI's old michigan basement

    Welcome to the forum Green Horn. Lots of good people and good advice here. To answer your question -- Yes. If you do not have any outlets in your basement right now and will be putting in a new outlet or two, they will need to be GFCI protected. The NEC, in a nutshell, requires GFCI in any "wet" location, that is in a garage, in a basement, bathrooms, outside of the house, kitchen, etc. And there are very specifics written for areas like the kitchen. If you haven't installed a GFCI before, they install just like any other receptacle but they are marked for "line" and "load." If you are installing just one, the wires running to it connect to the "line" side, which does not have the little yellow tape over them. If you are going to install more than one outlet, then you can connect the second (outlet) one to the "load" terminals of the GFCI, and from there all the other receptacles daisy chain off the regular outlet, yet they are protected by GFCI by their connection to the line of the first. Even if it were not required, making your basement or garage outlets GFCI protected is cheap insurance against getting a major, life-threatening hit of 120 volts. I make my own J-Boxes that I use on job sites and ALL my j-boxes have GFCI protection built in, and I use them even if I am plugging into a basement or garage or outside receptacle that is GFCI protected. I don't know if those GFCIs are still working properly and then I don't have to go test them to make sure.
    Cheers,
    Jim Don

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: GFI's old michigan basement

      Originally posted by JimDon View Post
      Even if it were not required, making your basement or garage outlets GFCI protected is cheap insurance against getting a major, life-threatening hit of 120 volts.
      Cheers,
      Jim Don
      Good call Jim Don. It happens all too often. At least Greenhorn had the good sense to ask prior to doing any work. I've seen a lot of DIY'ers who thought they knew what they were doing, but ended up putting themselves and their family's safety at risk.

      Comment

      Working...
      X