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  • electricity and cold weather

    does electricity's flow characteristics change when it gets cold?

    in other words, does the speed of transmission of data slow down? ie; wireless modem

    Vince

  • #2
    Re: electricity and cold weather

    Originally posted by Vince the Plumber View Post
    does electricity's flow characteristics change when it gets cold?

    in other words, does the speed of transmission of data slow down? ie; wireless modem

    Vince
    If it gets really cold you can have fun with super conductors, but it probably isn't that cold even up there.

    Not sure about your wireless modem, but batteries can be negatively impacted by the cold, along with any electronics run off of them.

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    • #3
      Re: electricity and cold weather

      I thought electricity sped up when it's cold?

      I have always wondered why data transfer works better in a twisted pattern than a stranded wire

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      • #4
        Re: electricity and cold weather

        Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
        I thought electricity sped up when it's cold?

        I have always wondered why data transfer works better in a twisted pattern than a stranded wire
        When you have the pair just free in the jacket there it will accept more noise when the two pairs are twisted together in a regular tight pattern. I don't think it would make a huge difference if the individual wires are stranded or solid.

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        • #5
          Re: electricity and cold weather

          Come on guys, don't try and confuse Vince. The only way to slow down electricity is with C clamps. The tighter they are on the wire the more they restrict the flow of electrons!
          info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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          • #6
            Re: electricity and cold weather

            Yeah but you still have to pitch the wires correctly......1/4" per foot....

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            • #7
              Re: electricity and cold weather

              Originally posted by killavolt View Post
              Yeah but you still have to pitch the wires correctly......1/4" per foot....


              "Holes! I need holes!"

              J.C.

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              • #8
                Re: electricity and cold weather

                Dan, what's the C for, conductivity? ie Conductivity Clamps

                Radio signals do behave differently depending on temperature
                of the atmosphere and the various air layers.
                "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                • #9
                  Re: electricity and cold weather

                  Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                  I thought electricity sped up when it's cold?

                  I have always wondered why data transfer works better in a twisted pattern than a stranded wire
                  Google the term "Common Node Rejection".

                  I'm sure you have seen comm lines such as CAT5e and CAT6 with twisted pairs of conductors. Well, the theory behind such construction is: When interference is induced into one conductor, it will effect the other conductor, thus cancel itself out, leaving only what's being transmitted. Pretty cool trick huh?
                  :}

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                  • #10
                    Re: electricity and cold weather

                    Originally posted by tailgunner View Post
                    Google the term "Common Node Rejection".

                    I'm sure you have seen comm lines such as CAT5e and CAT6 with twisted pairs of conductors. Well, the theory behind such construction is: When interference is induced into one conductor, it will effect the other conductor, thus cancel itself out, leaving only what's being transmitted. Pretty cool trick huh?
                    :}
                    It is a trick that is used on microphone cords too.
                    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                    • #11
                      Re: electricity and cold weather

                      Originally posted by cpw View Post
                      When you have the pair just free in the jacket there it will accept more noise when the two pairs are twisted together in a regular tight pattern. I don't think it would make a huge difference if the individual wires are stranded or solid.

                      The purpose of twisted pairs is constant impedance and reduced crosstalk and not EMI/noise rejection. Any 2 parallel conductors within close proximity will cancel out noise if current travels in opposite directions in them. If you want to reduce effects of EMI then you use shielded cable.

                      It also makes a huge difference if the wires are stranded or solid due to "skin effect". All distribution wiring is solid while patch cords are stranded. It all depends on what type of signal is in the cable.

                      F-, mr computer guy, sit down.

                      With lower temperature, resistance of cable is reduced and velocity of propagation is increased (speed of electric field propagation, and speed of current as a consequence).

                      Air temperature has negligent effect on 900MHz/1.8/1.9/2.4/5 GHz radio your wireless modem has, but precipitation does.

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