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  • Rv hook up

    I am istalling a RV pad the distance is 150' I would like to know what gauge of wire and type do I need to run a 30 amp service.
    I have no electrical outlets on the outside of the house and my breaker panel is on the other side so can I cut a hole in the wall a tap into a receptical outlet that is inside the house then the run will be 100'

  • #2
    Re: Rv hook up

    Originally posted by rhartman911 View Post
    I am istalling a RV pad the distance is 150' I would like to know what gauge of wire and type do I need to run a 30 amp service.
    I have no electrical outlets on the outside of the house and my breaker panel is on the other side so can I cut a hole in the wall a tap into a receptical outlet that is inside the house then the run will be 100'
    I will make the assumption you need 240/120 VAC at 20 amps to feed the RV. You can not tap into any existing circuits, you need to run back to the breaker panel. Install a 2 pole 30 amp breaker in the panel. You need to decide if you want to go with a direct burial cable (Type UF) or install buried conduit with individual conductors. If UF cable you will need at least 10/3 UF cable. (I would go with 8/3 to cover any voltage drop due to 150 feet of length.) Install an appropriately rated weatherproof receptical next to your RV pad.

    That being said: based on the wording of your question you do not seem to be up on the electrical requirements! Hire an electricial who is familiar with the code. If you want to save some money ask him if you an dig the ditch. He will tell you how deep.

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    • #3
      Re: Rv hook up

      He won't be running any 240 unless it is one hell of a super RV. Most RV hookups are 120 @ 30 amps. I have never been in a campground that offered 240 V hookups for RV's. I have seen some RV's that had 2 cords for 120/30A where the hookups were available, generally the larger units with 2 rooftop air conditioners. The plugs are about the size of a dryer plug but are of a unique configuration that I have never seen elsewhere except for RV's.

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      • #4
        Re: Rv hook up

        The 30 Amp 125 Volt rated plugs and receptacles are special just for RV use. They are NEMA configuration TT-30P and TT-30R.

        Wiring up the outside receptacle should be done by a licensed electrician.

        The plug can be purchased made up as a power cord with 25 feet of 10-3 type STW.

        Please note that some HUGE RVs actually are setup for 50 Amp, 120/240 Volt power. In that case the above won't apply other than to please consult with a good licensed electrician. This really isn't a DIY task.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Woussko; 05-26-2009, 01:26 PM.

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        • #5
          Re: Rv hook up

          Assume same rules as residence applies and then NEC 210.19 (A) (1) FPN No. 4 allows for not more than 5% voltage drop at farthest outlet. If 240 VAC delivery then that's 12 VAC. Use voltage drop calculation (inductance negligible) as follows:
          Vd=(2K x L x I)/Cm

          Where Vd= voltage drop, K=12.9 for copper and 21.2 for aluminum, L=length if run in feet, I= max amperage of breaker/service, and Cm= cross sectional area of conductor in circular mils.

          Remember run is from panel so let's say 150 feet. Let's use copper. Let's provide 30 Amps. Also let's say your going to run 240 VAC. Whether you use both legs or not no matter you'll be prepared. Ready? Plug and chug, solve for Cm:
          Cm=(2K x L x I)/Vd >>> Cm=(2x12.9x150x30)/12 >>> Cm=116100

          So now what? Look at the tables! Ugly's is my friend. Page 72 has conductor properties and says 10 AWG is 10380 and 8 AWG is 16510. Therefore 10 is too small and I better use 8 AWG wire. If I use 10 AWG then when a device starts my lights will dim and some of my electronics may freak out. No kidding.

          Now remember this is all the way from the panel and assuming you have 240VAC there. I see it fluctuate from utility from 232 to 248..... Always 60Hz but voltage another story. Most times though your fridge or AC can be fine at 10% Vd or even more. Just remember than E=IR no matter what and with R constant if you drop E...... your wire will get hot.

          Don't know if that helps. Maybe I've confused you. If your totally baffled then get an electrician. If it made sense then give me a ring if your in the area. I may have work for you!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Rv hook up

            i dont under stand why they put a cable that i would be comfortable running a huge arc welder off of on smaller campers, my dads friend has a truck bed mounted camper with the large cord and when he comes he has an adapter to conect it to a standard wall outlet and we hook it up to an extenision cord rated for 13 amps that has a crcuit breaker in it and it has never poped the breaker

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            • #7
              Re: Rv hook up

              Everybody has stories and examples of Stuff That Works. I'm a pretty big fan of Stuff That Works. When it comes to electrical though I suggest using the tables and the codes. The tables for amperage, wire size, conduit, voltage drop, etc, etc.. are there because somebody at one time got shocked, killed, burnt up or whatever. Nobody just made them up and said "Let's make these the rules for fun". The NEC is driven by the NFPA (as well as LP and NG regs and a bunch of others). The "F" in NFPA still stands for "Fire" the last time I checked. So if you can't or won't read the tables, or can't or won't read and understand an electrical reference like an Ugly's, your better off leaving that stuff to somebody more qualified.

              I'm sure the camper works great.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Rv hook up

                Welding "cables" usually refer to the leads running from the machine to the work. There is a work lead and there is a hot lead. They are as heavy as they are due to the potential of running the highest load thru them while max welding. The "cord" that runs from the machine to the receptacle can actually be de-rated under the NEC due to the intermittent use (duty cycle) of MOST welding operation. You have to change electrodes, you chip, grind, do set-up, make adjustments. Etc. Welding usually isn't a constant when running a bead. The down time allows for the de-rating cause the primary gets to cool down in between. Now for the camper, just the opposite is happening and requires a heavier power cord. You're running lights, a tv, maybe a microwave, a phone charger, and on and on. Those draws are constant and continuous. That can heat up the power cord pretty quickly and if it is underrated for the use, there is the possibility of meltdown at the receptacle (I've seen this firsthand). There is the possibility of overheating the cord and having the insulation deteriorate inside the cord bringing a hot in contact with a neutral or ground, and there is the possibility of fire. While the uncle or whatever relative has had good luck with running a smaller than needed feeder cord, he may be ultra careful with his use of juice and/or just gotten lucky. In most cases, that luck eventually runs out. Be safe, use the correct size wire for the job, as outlined in the NEC. Those rules are there for a reason.
                Cheers,
                Jim Don

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                • #9
                  Re: Rv hook up

                  This is a branch circuit, only 3% voltage drop is allowed. 120 volts at 30 amps at 150’ would require #4 AWG. I would run # 4 THHN in 1” rigid PVC conduit buried 18” below grade.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Rv hook up

                    That's why I specifically cited 210.19(A)(1) FPN No. 4 which states "...and where the maximum total voltage drop on both feeders and branch circuits to the farthest outlet does not exceed 5 percent, provide reasonable efficiency of operation." This further points to 215.2(A)(3) FPN No. 2 which basically states the same thing. The 3 percent rule is a common misconception that I've actually had to correct inspectors on. On long runs the difference can be in the thousands of dollars. I try not to pull the book out of the truck and correct the inspectors very often though as it seems to get them riled up.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Rv hook up

                      3% is for the branch circuit, 5% s is for the combination of the branch and feeder. You are adding a branch circuit.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Rv hook up

                        OP didn't specify if circuit is being added to main panel or sub panel. If sub panel then 3%, if main then 5%. Branches and Feeders as defined by Article 100, allowable voltage drop from 210.19 and 215.2. So the answer is "it depends where it's fed from".

                        Please specify code section. I look and post here to learn as well as help once in awhile. If I'm mistaken then by all means correct me. Just be ready to back it up so I can get something out of it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Rv hook up

                          On most homes the service is fed into the main breaker panel and there are no feeders. A mobile home the service disconnect is on a pole and feeders run to the branch-circuit overcurrent device (the breaker panel). If you have a subpanel in a detached garage you have feeders. 5% is 2% for feeders and 3% for branch circuit wiring. It you are coming off the main panel with a branch circuit voltage drop is limited to 3%. If you are coming off a subpanel you can use 5%.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Rv hook up

                            The voltage drop footnotes are a suggestion,not a requirement although there is a proposal to make VD calculations mandatory in the 2011 NEC.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Rv hook up

                              Originally posted by Norcal View Post
                              The voltage drop footnotes are a suggestion,not a requirement although there is a proposal to make VD calculations mandatory in the 2011 NEC.
                              +1

                              This is absolutely correct. Figuring in to counter VD is NOT a code requirement.
                              Good idea, yes.
                              Requirement, no.

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