Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

220v wiring question for range-

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 220v wiring question for range-

    Good morning-

    I am replacing my older single wall oven with a newer Maytag single oven-

    When I pulled the older oven out I have only three wires coming out of the wall - White with taped end (red I assume) Black and a bare ground

    the older oven was hooked up with oven-black to black, Oven-red to white tipped (red) and the oven-neutral(white) and the oven-ground from the stove -both hooked to the ground/bare from the house-


    My new oven has three wires plus a ground (similar to the old oven)- Red/black/white and bare-

    my research tells me that to hook them up in exactly the same way-

    any thoughts - or should I consider running a new four wire hook up

    thanks

    Jim

  • #2
    Re: 220v wiring question for range-

    Welcome to the forum.
    You'll need a new four-conductor wire to hook this new oven up properly. The white (neutral) is present because you have a 120 V leg in the oven itself, for the light or timer or whatever. Consequently the white (neutral) is present to make this circuit correct. The black and the red will each be a leg of 120, the white (a current carrying conductor, not to be confused with a bare ground wire) and the bare ground for grounding the appliance properly. This has been an upgrade in virtually all 240 v appliances in the last number of years. You'll find the same when you go to buy a new electric dryer too. Cheers,
    Jim Don

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 220v wiring question for range-

      Thanks for the reply-

      I had an electrician at the house during the day monday - he commented that I was AOK hooking up the Oven white and Oven Bare ground to the House line Ground-

      the black and the Red form the oven go to the same as the house line black and red

      crazy how many different opinions I have gotton on this

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 220v wiring question for range-

        The White and bare ground should NOT be connected together anywhere except for the main disconnecting point. After that, they are ALWAYS seperate. What the electrician has told you is wrong, and should not be done. You should have a new 4wire (probably 8/4 depending on the amperage of your unit) Run to the stove and installed into a outlet box, and a 4wire cord whip installed on your range. You can do what you want, but the code says it's not allowed and i recommend against it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: 220v wiring question for range-

          Originally posted by Badabing View Post
          The White and bare ground should NOT be connected together anywhere except for the main disconnecting point. After that, they are ALWAYS separate. What the electrician has told you is wrong, and should not be done. You should have a new 4wire (probably 8/4 depending on the amperage of your unit) Run to the stove and installed into a outlet box, and a 4wire cord whip installed on your range. You can do what you want, but the code says it's not allowed and i recommend against it.
          This is for safety and is good advice. In times past to save a little $$$ people did some wild and crazy things. I personally do not like the 6-2 with 8-2 power cords even though they normally do work fine. I prefer full size ground conductors all the way. In the old days they normally ran 2 insulated wires for hot and a bare for ground. They did a very stupid thing and used the grounding conductor as a neutral. This was/is BAD NEWS and why it's not allowed today.

          This was also done on clothes dryers. Again it's not safe.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: 240v wiring question for range-

            Actually, that 240 volt circuit still uses the bare wire as ground. Each leg of the 120 v supplies the neutral to the other. When one of the wires is negative, the other one becomes positive. Consequently, the two hots complete the circuit together and are out of phase with each other 60 times per second. The neutral (white) wire was not present in those circuits because it was not needed for the 240 volt circuit to be complete. The bare wire (allowed to be downsized by one under the NEC) was and still is an equipment ground, in essence standing by to move voltage safely to ground if something untoward happened in the circuit. It is not, will not be, will never ever ever be a current carrying conductor. That is why it is bare, that is why it is not marked white, that is why it should never, ever, ever be tied to a neutral EXCEPT inside the circuit breaker box. Never ever do that. End of story. White, neutral wires ARE CURRENT CARRYING CONDUCTORS. I cannot make this more clear. I don't think. The reason that there are FOUR conductors in new ranges and new clothes dryers is due to the fact that there are TWO different, yet entertwined circuits going on there. There are 2, 120 v legs coming in for the heating elements. The manufacturers have added lights, blower motors, timers, digital controls, etc., which work off 120 volt circuits. Those 120 volt circuits use one of the 120 v legs which come into the appliance, but then those do need a neutral, (white) conductor to correctly complete those circuits. That is why the white is present. The bare ground, again, stands silently on the side, ready to take the spillover current, if it should happen, safely back to the ground side in the cabinet.
            Cheers,
            Jim Don

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: 220v wiring question for range-

              Thanks Jim -

              I didn't make it clear as to what I meant. What I was trying to say is that too many times people actually use the bare ground conductor as neutral rather than as ground. I hate to confess but I'm done it on temporary work and posted warning notes that it's not safe.

              You are very correct that things with appliances have changed and thus a serious need for a real neutral and real ground conductor. I still hate seeing the 3 conductor power cords and wiring for ranges and clothes dryers knowing full well they use 120 Volt light bulbs, timer motors and more in them. Now you have some current flowing through what should be the ground conductor. I'm sure you know all too well about this.

              Woussko Out

              Comment

              Working...
              X