Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Monopoint lighting... Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Monopoint lighting...

    I currently have a couple ugly wall mount 2-light fixtures (kinda look like "emergency" lighting). I wanted to change over to hanging pendants and hang them on the ceiling directly above the current lights.

    My question is what am I looking for in a transformer? Looking at fleabay I see many different transformers (120VAC to 12VAC, to 12VDC, etc) from many different companies in many different price ranges.

    Do I need to match the xformer brand to the lighting brand? Are some better than others? (Im sure there are....any brand suggestions?)

    The pendants I like are by Tech/Tellia Lighting, but their xformers are really expensive, especially compared to other brands (Sea Gull lighting, etc).

    Any suggestions would be appreciated!

    Thanks.

    -Chris

  • #2
    Re: Monopoint lighting...

    Originally posted by chrisexv6 View Post
    I currently have a couple ugly wall mount 2-light fixtures (kinda look like "emergency" lighting). I wanted to change over to hanging pendants and hang them on the ceiling directly above the current lights.

    My question is what am I looking for in a transformer? Looking at fleabay I see many different transformers (120VAC to 12VAC, to 12VDC, etc) from many different companies in many different price ranges.

    Do I need to match the xformer brand to the lighting brand? Are some better than others? (Im sure there are....any brand suggestions?)

    The pendants I like are by Tech/Tellia Lighting, but their xformers are really expensive, especially compared to other brands (Sea Gull lighting, etc).

    Any suggestions would be appreciated!

    Thanks.

    -Chris
    I hate to say it but, when it comes to lighting, it's best to buy the kits with the transformers with it. It is often cheaper to buy a new light assembly than it is to buy the components. Look up the price of lighting ballasts, thenb look up the price of the fixture itself. the first thing that will come to mind is: WTF? How is THIS possible?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Monopoint lighting...

      Hey Chris, depends on the fixture, how they mount.
      The vast majority of monopoint and multipoint canopies use integrated transformers. Simply put, these canopies have a step-down transformer built into their enclosure or, occasionally, mounted on top so that the small transformer may be tucked into an empty area of the junction box. Integrated transformer canopies are common for the following reasons:
      • integrated transformer canopies are designed to be used as direct 'drop in' replacements to existing fixtures mounted over any standard four inch junction box
      • they use existing wiring, so installation does not require access to the area above the ceiling
      • they may be dimmed using standard incandescent dimmers
      • they are not susceptible to voltage drop (which can be an issue when using remote transformer canopies)
      Remote Transformer Canopies
      Remote transformer canopies seperate the transformer from the canopy itself to allow multiple canopies (and thus fixtures) to be powered from a common transformer. The complexity and wiring requirements of remote transformer canopies makes them far more rare. These canopies do, however, have some advantages over the integrated transformer style. Specifically, remote transformer canopies:
      • are much smaller than integrated transformer canopies since they need not enclose a transformer. Some remote mount canopies are less than an inch across which results in very clean installations.
      • may have a lower overall cost when installing several monopoint fixtures
      • may use magnetic transformers which are preferred by many lighting designers
      If the remote transformer is what you are wanting to do then the answer would be no you can use any transformer that is the proper voltage {line being 120vac} {load being 12vac or 12vdc} depending on the fixtures you choose and the output kva is big enough to handle the load.
      If the fixtures are independant to each other then u will have to use the transformers made for each fixture,as they are small enough to recess into the junction box at each light.

      Really need more info plz
      ty huck

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Monopoint lighting...

        I was leaning towards remote xformers mostly for asthetic reasons (low to no profile mounting for the light fixture), but also because the location of the new lights would require some wire fishing....it would probably be easier to fish the wires to a central spot and hook them into a remote xformer than to fish 4 separate line voltage feeds. I need to fish 4 wires either way but onto the next point..... I want to run 4 lights, so a remote xformer seems to make more sense than 4 separate integrated canopies.

        In regards to kits, I found a few at Lowes that I liked but they were all monorail systems. I actually like that look better BUT manufacturer says they can only be installed on flat ceilings. walls and/or angled ceilings require a different kit, not available at any place but lighting shops (which means lots more $$$). The hanging monopoint pendants can hang down on an angle without any extra kits/hardware.

        -Chris

        Comment

        Working...
        X