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  • #16
    Re: $6,500 paper weight

    Hi Andy,
    Yes that's correct, the button on the motor is tripping and not the circuit breaker in the panel. When I took delivery on the machine, all I had to do is mount the dc drive motors and plug the mill in. I have tried a different circuit and the motor does the same thing. I believe it's a thermal overload as I have to wait awhile to reset it. The mill ran for about 2 min. this morning and tripped out. The motor wasn't even warm to the touch.

    What I meant about may or not be code was the grounding rod I put the shop on. I tied into a 220v with a 30 amp in the main that was for a self contain AC unit. Ran 10 ga wire from a junction box under the house to the shop. Wired a 100 amp sub panel in the shop. The neutral goes back to the main panel. I only put 1 grounding rod on the shop. I think in my area it calls for 2 at least 6 feet apart.

    A far as electricity goes. I pretty much know single phase. I have connect my own power to the house and have wired my parents room addition. 3 phase throws me for a loop ( I get help with 3 phase).

    My grandfather taught me how to wire a house. His favorate saying was " If it doesn't throw sparks and doesn't bite you when you turn it on ,then you did it right". Scary huh!!!

    The company has a support line, I'll have to wait until Monday afternoon as they are in Ca.

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    • #17
      Re: $6,500 paper weight

      I need to be sure, but did you measure about 123 Volts but when you started the milling machine it dropped to about 90 Volts? 119 Volts with it running should be OK but we don't yet know how much current it draws.

      If you have a portable electric heater rated at 1500 Watts and 120 Volts, try measuring Voltage at the receptacle with it off and on. If the Voltage drops more than a few Volts (more than 5 Volts) when you turn on the heater, that circuit needs work.

      When the motor is starting up and running does it growl loud? Is it slow to come up to speed?

      As others said, I really think it may be time for you to STOP attempts of running the milling machine until a good electrician can check things over for you. Measuring starting and running current is important and to properly measure motor starting current requires a peak reading AC Ammeter. The better digital clamp-on type often have this feature.

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      • #18
        Re: $6,500 paper weight

        yes that's correct. When I checked the volts it read 123v, dropped to 90v when I started the mill up and leveled off at 119v . I didn't have an electric heater but I did have a hair dryer (125v 60 hz 1875 watts). I rechecked the circuit as follows. 124v with no load, 119.4v with hair dryer set on high.

        The motor comes up to speed fine and is not making any growling sounds.

        I don't have a meter that will read ac amps(guess I need one). And I'm trying to think of one I could borrow.

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        • #19
          Re: $6,500 paper weight

          Update... I call the company on this,They said the way I have it hooked up should be more than enough to run the mill motor. They wanted me to try a 30 amp breaker in my panel. Saying that the motor was not getting enough amps. So I went to town, got a 30 amp breaker ( Dreaded the thought of having to pull 10 ga wire in place of the 12 ga). The salesman said for a test the 12ga would be fine but if it fixes it I would have to pull 10ga wire. Just sitting here thinking if 12 ga wire would limit the amps??? Any ways, I put the 30 amp breaker in and started the motor. It ran fine for about 3 min and then tripped. I called the company back and explained that it done the same thing after about 3 min. They said that there must be a problem with the motor and will ship me out today UPS ground. Also they said that they run these mills for about 2 hrs before the ship, but who knows what happens during shipping. My only concern is this second motor will do the same thing.. I probable forgot to mention that I could not run the mill on the top speed setting from ths start as it would trip out also.

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          • #20
            Re: $6,500 paper weight

            With the big Voltage drop during startup either your motor has problems or the circuit isn't near heavy enough. With the Voltage drop about the same when you tried the hair dryer, I bet replacing the motor once the new one arrives will make a big difference. It seems that your motor has insane starting current draw. I also think it may have too high of a no load current demand which is why the overload protector pops.

            Question: Just to be sure is it a small red button on the motor that pops out and after a few minutes you press it, here a click and then it will start and run only to pop out again?

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            • #21
              Re: $6,500 paper weight

              Yes, the red button does just that.

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              • #22
                Re: $6,500 paper weight

                I think for now it would be wise to wait for the replacement motor to arrive.

                You really should have a good electrician come and check out the wiring and circuit(s) to be sure they are OK and also that they are safe. This should be done while you're waiting on the replacement motor. It would be wise to also have an electrician check things before the first powering up of the new motor.

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                • #23
                  Re: $6,500 paper weight

                  Ok on the phone with one now..

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: $6,500 paper weight

                    Originally posted by tradesman351 View Post
                    Ok on the phone with one now..
                    Great You're doing the right thing. I know the $$$ factor can get a person frustrated but over time this can really save you some big $$$.

                    If you're thinking of having more machinery, you may well want to pull a heavier cable to the shop and install a more serious sub-panel out there. It's a good idea to put the lights on their own private circuit so in case you do overload a circuit you won't be in the dark.

                    While this may seem crazy, it's a wise idea to have a simple rechargeable battery emergency light in any work shop. If machines are running and the lights go out it isn't good. Keyword: Your Safety

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                    • #25
                      Re: $6,500 paper weight

                      I agree, Safety first. As far as $$$, my electrician buddy is coming out for free. Can't beat that with a stick..

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                      • #26
                        Re: $6,500 paper weight

                        Next time I head over to Hoptown I'll sop in and say hi.
                        info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                        • #27
                          Re: $6,500 paper weight

                          Cool, look forward to meeting ya.

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