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  • #16
    Re: Hooking up generator

    Originally posted by Craig Moore View Post
    Wow....$700. That coupled with the cost of a generator, gasoline for the generator, maybe going to a motel till the power comes back on would be a more sensible solution. Nothing is simple nowdays. Makes you realize (not condone) why people would plug it into a dryer outlet like I first ask about. Anyway, the Generlink is the way I'm going.

    Craig
    A transfer switch, permit, and the electrician to install it all will run you that much easily, and it will take a half day or better. The Generlink is plug-n-pray, takes less than 15 minutes. AND...you can take it with you when you move, the transfer switch would more than likely be left behind unless you wanted to incur even more labor to have it removed.

    Their web site lists the Ridgid RD8000 as being compatable
    http://www.generlink.com/generators_main.cfm
    Last edited by Bob D.; 02-10-2010, 06:56 AM. Reason: Added note about Ridgid RD8000
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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    • #17
      Re: Hooking up generator

      Around here, if you don't have an approved gen plug in, and the power company catches you with one plugged into the house circuits, they will cut your power, and it takes an act of congress to get it back (not to mention fines, etc).

      Do It Right. You and your family's life is at risk (burning your house down). The power guy getting your power back is at risk (can be electrocuted from your stupid gen hook up), and the power grid itself is at risk (when power comes back on, phase imbalance will cause the grid to shut down and could damage equipment which you would be liable to pay for. "Got a million $$ punk"?)

      This is not a situation where you say "I think I know 'cause I read it in a book/saw it on TV"

      Go
      Practicing at practical wood working

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      • #18
        Re: Hooking up generator

        I for one have heeded the good advice. It will be "Generlink" or a transfer switch or nothing. If the power goes out before I can get it done, I will use a couple extension cords for the critical items, (lights, pellet stove, fridge/freezer, coffee pot, etc).

        Hope others understand the dangers.

        Craig
        Never outsmart your common sense

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        • #19
          Re: Hooking up generator

          Craig

          You might ask a few good electrical contractors about installing one of this type of load transfer devices. Installation (If you have a good, not too full circuit breaker load center) can go pretty quickly. I like these in that you have total control of which circuits (loads) are connected to your generator and when. Having the 2 load meters helps prevent overloading your generator and balancing the loads.

          http://www.reliancecontrols.com/Prod...px?pl=pt&c=&f=

          There are different models depending on how many circuits you want to be able to power from your generator and on what features you will need.

          Question: Do you have a well and pump, or are you on city water?
          Last edited by Woussko; 02-08-2010, 09:22 AM.

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          • #20
            Re: Hooking up generator

            Woussko,

            Thanks for that link, I looked at it but not too sure what I'm looking at.
            I guess thats where a good electrician comes in. I'll print it out, and I know a good contractor real well, sort all this out cause the GenerLink still is appealing. I have a well pump. I would like to run it, the fridge, hot water tank, several outlets throughout the house along with a few lights. The kids are grown & moved out so it's just the wife & I which makes it pretty easy to manage.

            This has been a good learning experience for me. I knew it would be harder than just starting a generator and presto we have power.

            Craig
            Never outsmart your common sense

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            • #21
              Re: Hooking up generator

              How about one of these. UL listed and as safe as you can get. www.interlockkit.com
              I usually do not recommend this to anyone that cannot manage there loads. But it is an alternative to a transfer switch and makes back feeding safe and NEC compliant.
              Licensed Electrician

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              • #22
                Re: Hooking up generator

                Originally posted by John Valdes View Post
                How about one of these. UL listed and as safe as you can get. www.interlockkit.com
                I usually do not recommend this to anyone that cannot manage there loads. But it is an alternative to a transfer switch and makes back feeding safe and NEC compliant.
                I would check with your power supplier and your local inspector before buying the item,

                and if that system is hook up properly it is not "back feed" it is using the breaker box as a transfer switch, by blocking the two breakers into only one can be turned on at once,

                and if one uses the proper plug which is a recessed inverted "plug", you do not have the exposed blades as on a normal 'back feeding" cable set up, as the "extension cord" is a normal cord with a plug and a receptacle on the other end not two plug ends with the exposed blades,

                Rain tight Power Inlet Box — 30 Amp
                http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...0924_200220924

                power cord, 30 amp
                http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...Product%20Page

                note: the links are for information only not an endorsement of the company or product,
                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                attributed to Samuel Johnson
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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                • #23
                  Re: Hooking up generator

                  Wow, am I ever lost. Hope I don't lose power
                  I will just have to get an electrician but I am also going to talk to the power company to make sure.
                  Craig
                  Never outsmart your common sense

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                  • #24
                    Re: Hooking up generator

                    it's really not that terribly complicated. since con ed here in NY hasn't yet approved things like generlink, we're kind of stuck with the transfer switch/flanged male connector outlet to connect portable generators to houses. i've installed my own and 4 others (all are 10 circuit or less manual transfer switches) under the watchful eye of a friend who is a licensed master electrician. once you understand what's going on inside an electrical panel, the appropriate care will keep you out of trouble. personally, i stay on the house side of my main breaker. dealing with live loads from the utility is outside of my scope of experience.

                    however, if you are at all unsure about working inside a panel, don't do it. electricity needs to be respected at all times. if you go the electrician route, don't be afraid to comparison shop. as with all the trades, there are good mechanics and there are not so good mechanics. they don't all charge the same and they don't all do the work to the same standards of neatness and professionalism. good luck.
                    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Hooking up generator

                      ...since con ed here in NY hasn't yet approved things like generlink...
                      You have specifically asked ConEd about the GenerLink and they disapproved it?

                      Neighboring utilities Atlantic Electric (I emailed them and asked) and PSE&G (I have heard but no first hand knowledge) have approved its use.
                      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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                      • #26
                        Re: Hooking up generator

                        Craig,
                        You've got a lot of good feedback and information here, and I understand that you're somewhat baffled by it all now.
                        With that said, here's what I'd do. Get your genset, buy 3-4 ext. cords of the size you need, and plot out which items in your house you want to power. You can run a refrigerator or freezer for awhile, disconnect it, and if you don't open the door for a long time, you can keep items cold. So it's not like you have to run a refrig. constantly. Same with the freezer. Furnace you'd need at night mostly, as a house will stay relatively warm during day if you have a southern exposure and the sun shines. Lights are mostly at night. Run well pump and pump some water into sanitary water jugs and save. See the routine here? If blackouts are a real issue in your area and you end up doing this more than 1-2 times a year, you might want to go ahead and invest either in the transfer switch or one of the other higher items recommended. If you go the route I outlined, won't cost you a whole lot of money and will help you make a decision if you want to/need to spend more money in the future. Hope this helps to go.
                        Cheers,
                        Jim Don
                        PS Don't be afraid to ask more if you feel the need. Nobody's going to shut you down on a really good topic of inquiry.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Hooking up generator

                          Originally posted by John Valdes View Post
                          How about one of these. UL listed and as safe as you can get. www.interlockkit.com
                          I usually do not recommend this to anyone that cannot manage there loads. But it is an alternative to a transfer switch and makes back feeding safe and NEC compliant.
                          I'm confused - Everything I've heard is don't backfeed through the panel because there can be leakage in the main breaker yet the interlockkit device appears to just be backfeeding.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Hooking up generator

                            Originally posted by BHD View Post
                            I would check with your power supplier and your local inspector before buying the item,

                            and if that system is hook up properly it is not "back feed" it is using the breaker box as a transfer switch, by blocking the two breakers into only one can be turned on at once,
                            Anytime you bring power into a panel through a branch circuit breaker, it is called "backfeeding". Its no different than connecting the generator to any single 220 volt receptacle in the structure. Its just a whole lot safer and UL approved when using an interlock kit. It does not have to be difficult to install and cost alot of money for it to be safe and reliable.

                            Utilities and AHJ's can always make their own rules. It does not always make their rules right. Of course we must follow their rules regardless.
                            Interlock kits like this have been used for years and used safely. I have installed a number of them over the years with no issues. I also use one here at home.
                            Licensed Electrician

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                            • #29
                              Re: Hooking up generator

                              yes your technical correct, on the term, what I was pointing out is if you use an interlock kit and it is set up correctly, with the approved input set from the generator it is not any thing like being Back feeding through the dryer out let or similar, in it safety,

                              as first you have the interlock, so only the one breaker can be on at once, ( I am not sure our power suppler would approve of the system, as it can easily be defeated by removing the cover of the panel, and as stated in there brochure which I posted above they indicate they do not trust the breaker), and that the power supply cord and receptacle is of the proper type, not having an exposed set of blades that could be hot.

                              and from what I can find any breaker that is "back fed" is to fastened in place. I would think that would apply in a interlock kit situation.
                              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                              attributed to Samuel Johnson
                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Hooking up generator

                                The idea of several good extension cords seems pretty good for now and over time you'll be glad to have the extension cords for other uses. There is one problem that's the well pump which in most cases is setup for 240 Volts and is hard wired. You could rig up a short power cord for the pump and install a receptacle such as a NEMA 6-15 or 6-20 where you would normally leave it plugged in, but in case of a power failure, unplug it and plug it into a special made up extension cord.

                                The bottom line is that there are several ways you can do this, but I really think it's time to call in a good electrician and discuss which loads you consider as Critical and let him work out what to do.

                                There are special Load Centers which have 2 back to back main breakers with a handle interlock. I remember seeing them in both Cutler-Hammer type CH and Square D type QO. Such is a good way to go, but installation gets more involved than with a transfer device for several loads such as in my earlier post. A company Gen-Tran makes lots of similar devices and this is where a good electrician that's into doing residential / small farm generator work can really help.

                                Hint for now: If you have a storm coming you may want to fill up several clean plastic trash cans with water while you can. You can use this water to wash hands at a sink and to "bucket flush" a toilet. For drinking and cooking, the clean plastic jugs idea works well.

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