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  • Conduit requirements for service Entrance

    What is the requirement for Conduit on The service entrance. Residental install on Long Island New york? Does it have to be galv pipe ?

  • #2
    Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

    That is up to the AHJ (Authority Having Juristiction)

    Up here in Mass there are local codes refered to as "Contingency of service" Where the environment encountered dictates how services are constructed.

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    • #3
      Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

      I agree with tailgunner. It is a jurisdictional thing. Ask the AHJ. You have to pull a permit anyway so asking him or her now is no issue.

      Overhead or underground service?
      Licensed Electrician

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      • #4
        Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

        I would like to share a case my NEC instructor (Whom was also an electrical inspector for decades) gave to us where such a bylaw came into being.

        In the Berkshire mountains of Western Mass, there was a dispute between the regional inspector, the electrician, and the power company (Western Massachusetts Electric Company aka "WEMCO") Now keep in mind WMECO pulls their own conductors from the grid to the meter, it's the electrician that installs the conduit to do so. So here is what happened: An electrican installed an undergound service for a residence in PVC, all by the book, the proper depth, proper debris-free fill, sch. 80 up the pole, etc. However, the power company absolutely REFUSED to install their conductors and hook up power to the residence, on the grounds that power company requires underground services to be in Galvanized Ridgid Conduit. This is of course AFTER the electrican put everything in the ground.

        Here is where the inspector was stuck, by rights, he HAD to approve the service install, since it was all done by Code and under a licensed electrician. So the matter was brought to State Supreme Court. Well, the court ruled in favor of WMECO, due to the presented arguement brought forth that WMECO declared that the frost level for that region extends four feet underground, and the resulting ground heaving has shattered many PVC-ran services, thus causing hardships among WMECO service personal. Plus they invoced a clause regarding (I'm paraphrasing here) "Equipment must be listed for the environment encountered". So the "Contingency of Service" bylaw was enacted.

        The same holds true for structures built along the coast. Due to the salty conditions from the ocean, all services must have copper conductors to resist such corrosive environments. So, to better answer your question than my previous post. Not only call the AHJ, but the region's power compnay as well, since it is usually the utility company that trumps over any NEC requirements.

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        • #5
          Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

          Originally posted by LockSmithSavant View Post
          What is the requirement for Conduit on The service entrance. Residental install on Long Island New york? Does it have to be galv pipe ?
          When I was down there 100 years ago (LILCO days) we had to sleeve any SEU in EMT or gal up to about 8-9 feet or so. I have no idea what the actual code was at the time. Things have obviously changed a lot since then.

          Here is your best bet: http://www.lipower.org/commercial/trade/redbook.html

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          • #6
            Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

            Thanks guys

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            • #7
              Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

              up in ontario, the service is to have sand 6 inches below and above the conduit which is to be pvc . galvanized conduit should not be used as in ten years it may not be there as it will rot out.

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              • #8
                Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

                Originally posted by tailgunner View Post
                That is up to the AHJ (Authority Having Juristiction)

                Up here in Mass there are local codes refered to as "Contingency of service" Where the environment encountered dictates how services are constructed.
                Funny, built homes on the Cape in the 70s. I remember We called meters "the fish bowl "
                The service drop was a romex like material from the weatherhead to meter. Here in N. Calif
                It's all Galvy conduit. 2" for 200 amp. I never wired back there. Here under My G.C. License I wire all our projects,including New services! I love It, all inspected Just like My plumbing
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                • #9
                  Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

                  Mine used to be overhead, and the metallic conduit to the weatherhead was 2 1/4" od, Now it's underground, and uses 2 1/2" NMC.
                  Alabama plumbers

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                  • #10
                    Re: Conduit requirements for service Entrance

                    I have a similar story to tailgunner's.

                    When I did my panel upgrade, the existing conduit was ok per NEC. But the power company requires a larger conduit, no exceptions. You can have all the approvals you want from the AHJ, but if you don't do what they spec... no meter.

                    In my case, an underground service, I had to abandon the existing conduit. This was unfortunate since reusing the existing one, which came up through the foundation would have been much cleaner. Not wanting to chip out a new hole in foundation and tear out the exterior stucco to replace the old conduit, I ran the new conduit external and used a surface mount socket/panelboard. It was so ugly (on the side of the house but visible from the street) that I ended up not only having to fill the hole in the stucco where the old flush box was, but also building an enclosure - finished in stucco to match the house - to hide the new one, with a door and including a hole for the meter-reader becasue they don't want to open the door. Quite a hassle for what should have been a pretty simple job.

                    I knew about the conduit going in, but the moral of the story is, don't rely on the code or even a call to the AHJ. Make the call, but also get the requirements from the power company. Here in No. CA dealing with PG&E is much more of a pain than dealing with the city inspectors. Plus, they are criminals. After I had all the work done, conduit in, panel board in & wired, inspections done, PG&E came out to pull their new service conductors. It was a dead straight shot from their concrete vault to my panelboard, just one 90. They sent two guys... took them 1-1/2 hours to make that very easy pull and connect up... the bill was $1900. Actually it was twice that, but I raised a huge stink and they cut it in half! The original bill for that hour of work almost $4k. On top of all that, we pay an average of 22 cents here... the top-tier rate is over 40 cents. Crazy.

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