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  • Electric to my shed.

    I'm planning on running a dedicated outlet to my shed, about 40 foot from the back of my house, for a deep freezer.
    My current thinking is to run 3/4" pvc from the house to the shed, and push 12g wire through. There are no inspections in the county I live in, so I want to make sure i'm not overlooking something silly. I did contact an electrician, but he wanted to just bury uv rated romex and the only conduit would be around the wire above ground to protect it from the weed whacker.

    Suggestions?
    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

  • #2
    Re: Electric to my shed.

    If thats all you plan on running in the future?,and not too worried on code i don't see a problem,I'd use some sort of conduit to help protect against stone rub and go at least 10" or so.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Electric to my shed.

      I'm NOT an electrician, so hopefully one or two will jump in here. I'd go at least a foot down (I think the spec for here in NY is 14-inches, but it's been a long time since I've reviewed the code on that.) I would definitely use conduit and plastic is probably okay. But, I'd put some flat stone or gravel on top of that, as an indication to a future digger, that something may be buried there.

      Not sure about the 12 ga, as that seems like a long run... ask about it where you make the purchase.

      At the outlet side, you definitely need to use a GFI I believe. By shed, I presume this to be an unfinished building of sorts, so guarding against electrical shock is a definite must, IMO.

      I hope this helps,

      CWS

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Electric to my shed.

        Thanks guys,
        The shed is unfinished, but thankfully is nice and dry, would a GFI breaker be better than a GFI outlet?

        Backfilling with stone is the same way we do plumbing around here, so that makes perfect sense.
        No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Electric to my shed.

          Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
          I'm planning on running a dedicated outlet to my shed, about 40 foot from the back of my house, for a deep freezer.
          My current thinking is to run 3/4" pvc from the house to the shed, and push 12g wire through. There are no inspections in the county I live in, so I want to make sure i'm not overlooking something silly. I did contact an electrician, but he wanted to just bury uv rated romex and the only conduit would be around the wire above ground to protect it from the weed whacker.

          Suggestions?
          Pushing 12 romex through 3/4" pvc is like trying to put sox on a rooster.

          Lay the romex in the trench and slide the pvc over it.

          I had the same situation with wiring my outbuilding. I used 1" electrical pvc conduit and #6THHN with #10THHN ground. It's been there since 1988 with no problems.

          James

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Electric to my shed.

            Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
            I'm planning on running a dedicated outlet to my shed, about 40 foot from the back of my house, for a deep freezer.
            My current thinking is to run 3/4" pvc from the house to the shed, and push 12g wire through. There are no inspections in the county I live in, so I want to make sure i'm not overlooking something silly. I did contact an electrician, but he wanted to just bury uv rated romex and the only conduit would be around the wire above ground to protect it from the weed whacker.

            Suggestions?

            I always run pvc.You never know what the future will bring.My thoughts are, the price difference in 3/4 to 1 inch pvc is minimal. So why not run 1 inch just incase in the future you may find it a good decision.You can either pull out the old and pull in new,or pull another circuit or 2.
            It must be gfci protected,either a gfci receptacle or gfci breaker will do,gfci recptacles are cheaper.
            The conduit must be at least 18 inches deep,unless it goes under a drive way, then it must be at least 24 inches deep.When ever I bury conduit through a yard ,I back fill with dirt or sand up to about 6 inches from the surface,then lay some caution tape in the ditch, then finish back filling.
            If and when some one digs in the area , the caution tape should be a red flag for digging.

            hope this helps.

            Huck

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Electric to my shed.

              IMO I would at lest us 10 gage, some day you may want more power for a small air compressor or some thing, I have alway found if you go a little more on projects like this normally your never sorry, but I have been sorry for not going with larger conduit, or heaver wire than the original plans,

              It seems like there is always some thing that comes to mind later,

              just a thought,
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Electric to my shed.

                can romex be run through a conduit? I thought i'd have to push individual black/white/green wires through.
                No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Electric to my shed.

                  Yes it can be,they make all sizes conduit.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Electric to my shed.

                    I had been told "by a general contractor, not an electrician" that romex would overheat in a conduit. I'd imagine there would have to be a heavy load on the wire for that to happen though.

                    ok, so 10 guage wire, with GFCI, 1" conduit. I'll check the price difference between feeding individual wires and romex.

                    I appreciate the inpute guys
                    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Electric to my shed.

                      Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                      I had been told "by a general contractor, not an electrician" that romex would overheat in a conduit. I'd imagine there would have to be a heavy load on the wire for that to happen though.
                      Right IF.... the load exceeds the wires capability's.

                      10-2 romex isn't very expensive,messing around with individual wires is going to be a PITA your going to be finding out.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Electric to my shed.

                        Originally posted by James P View Post
                        Pushing 12 romex through 3/4" pvc is like trying to put sox on a rooster.
                        Lay the romex in the trench and slide the pvc over it.
                        James
                        That IMO is a waste of time. If you buy conduit, use it like conduit. Pull individual wires to the shed.

                        Originally posted by huckster4 View Post
                        I always run pvc.You never know what the future will bring.My thoughts are, the price difference in 3/4 to 1 inch pvc is minimal. So why not run 1 inch just incase in the future you may find it a good decision.You can either pull out the old and pull in new,or pull another circuit or 2.
                        It must be gfci protected,either a gfci receptacle or gfci breaker will do,gfci recptacles are cheaper.
                        The conduit must be at least 18 inches deep,unless it goes under a drive way, then it must be at least 24 inches deep.When ever I bury conduit through a yard ,I back fill with dirt or sand up to about 6 inches from the surface,then lay some caution tape in the ditch, then finish back filling.
                        If and when some one digs in the area , the caution tape should be a red flag for digging.

                        hope this helps.

                        Huck
                        Very good advice.

                        Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                        can romex be run through a conduit? I thought i'd have to push individual black/white/green wires through.
                        NM (Romex) cannot be used in buried conduit. Underground installations are considered "wet" locations and NM (Romex) is not allowed in wet locations.
                        UF (Flat Gray Cable) is rated for direct burial. I do not like it. But you can use it. You will never get it into the conduit. It is not designed for use with conduit.

                        Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                        I had been told "by a general contractor, not an electrician" that romex would overheat in a conduit.
                        He has a point. But a moot point none the less, as Romex cannot be used for this application. Do not pay any attention to a general contractor. GC's generally have no clue.

                        Follow Hucksters advice and you will be just fine. Good luck and have fun.
                        Licensed Electrician

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Electric to my shed.

                          Thank you for the input, I'm probably going to start digging the trench in the next weekend or two.
                          No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Electric to my shed.

                            With all due respect, some of the advice on this thread is pretty screwy.

                            When you say "romex" I assume you are talking "type NM".

                            You can't use "romex" NM in a wet location. Underground direct burial OR buried conduit is a considered a wet location.

                            If you want to use direct burial wire, get type UF. Check local codes, the burial depth will likely be 18" - maybe more. I don't personally like direct burial.

                            If you go with conduit (I would) you shouldn't build your conduit system "over" the wire, as suggested in a post above. One reason is that as you glue the joints, the glue gets on the insulation and damages it. Dig your trench, build your conduit. Be sure to deburr the inside edge of each piece of conduit so you don't have sharp edges to damage the wire while pulling it through. Let the glue dry, then blow the conduit out with air or pull rags through it to clean it. The trench depth for pvc will be pretty deep, check your local code requirement. I just did one here at my place and it had to be 24" from grade to top of the conduit. Your code will likely require 18" or more.

                            It's a very good idea to put in a biger conduit than you need. It will pull easier and alow expansion room. You also want to *consider* putting in larger gage wire than needed. The reason is, if you ever do end up pulling more wire throught the conduit, ALL the wire in there will have to be de-rated. So IMO going to larger wire with a larger conduit makes sense.

                            Forget the "romex". Get some THWN solid - not stranded - wire. I assume it's a 120V circuit. Get the right colors - white, black, green. Most THHN is actually dual rated THHN/THWN. You can't use THHN that isn't dual rated so make sure it's the right stuff.

                            You don't push wire, you pull it. Pull all your conductors at once. Pulling three conductors through a 40 foot pvc run should not be a problem as long as you have 360 degrees, or less, of bends, a clean, internally deburred conduit run, and use lots of lube. Or use the Southwire SimPull THHN/THWN wire which does well with no lube (but use the lube anyway). Attach the wire to the fish tape or pull rope very securely, and tape it up so nothing will hang up inside the conduit. It helps to have someone at the feed end of the conduit lubing and feeding it in, but the primary way to move wire is pulling it. If you've never pulled wire before, get someone that has done it to show you how to attach the wire to the fishtape. Pulling is easy when you know how but can be a disaster if you don't do it right.

                            Edit: Oops, didn't see John Valdes' post. Sorry, John... looks like you hit all the points, as you always do!
                            Last edited by Andy_M; 04-25-2010, 12:20 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Electric to my shed.

                              Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                              There are no inspections in the county I live in,
                              With that statement romex in glued/sealed conduit will work for many many years no issues,12 years ago i did my garden shed and no fires yet,i am not a electrician just giving my real world experience FWIW to the OP.

                              Comment

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