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is 220 cheaper than 110?

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  • is 220 cheaper than 110?

    I have heard many discussions regarding this and need a straight answer from an electrician.

    Does running a tool (like a TS or Jointer) on a dedicated 220V circuit cheaper (in electricity costs/consumption) than running the same tool on a dedicated 20A 110V circuit?

  • #2
    Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

    For the same size motor no, there is no difference in consumption.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

      Last I checked, the power company bills their customers in kilowatts per hour.

      The straight answer, you are paying for power, you are not paying for amperage, you are not paying for voltage, you are paying for power. That appliance can run on one volt, or a thousand volts, it makes zero difference.

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      • #4
        Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

        220 draws 1/2 the amperage, but double the voltage. so the answer is equal

        but lets look at it from a different perspective.

        you need 2 breakers but you will not need a wire gauge as heavy as a 120 volt line. so in theory, there could be a savings in the smaller gauge wire and conduit. should also be less of a voltage drop as you're drawing 1/2 the amps and that will make a difference on large hard starting motors.

        my large tools, compressors, run on 220-240.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #5
          Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

          There could actually be a slight savings in the time it takes a motor to start on 230 as opposed to 115 volts. The amp draw to start a motor is 3 to 5 times it's running amps, so the longer it takes to start, the more amps it's drawing. Amps times Volts = Watts and that's what your charged for.
          Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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          • #6
            Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

            Originally posted by speedbump View Post
            There could actually be a slight savings in the time it takes a motor to start on 230 as opposed to 115 volts. The amp draw to start a motor is 3 to 5 times it's running amps, so the longer it takes to start, the more amps it's drawing. Amps times Volts = Watts and that's what your charged for.
            Still not technically accurate. With what you state if the motor draws more amperage at 120, less amperage at 240 would work out to the same.
            The one thing that is true is what Rick stated about savings in cost of wire and considerably less voltage drop.
            Also, 240v would be ever so slightly more efficient than 120v, depending on the load. Thing is, the difference would be so minuscule you would NEVER even notice it.

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            • #7
              Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

              Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
              ....
              Also, 240v would be ever so slightly more efficient than 120v, depending on the load. Thing is, the difference would be so minuscule you would NEVER even notice it.
              About 10 cents every 72 hours of full load operation.
              50 feet of 14 gauage at 12 A has a power loss of about 18.5W
              50 feet of 14 gauage at 6 A has a power loss of about 4.6W
              The difference is 13.9 W so at 10 cents a KWH it would take about 72 hours

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              • #8
                Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

                So considering the typical usage of a table saw, jointer or compressor, it would take about 15 -20 years to reach 72 hours of actual usage.

                10 cents savings in 15 years. Not a bad haul.

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                • #9
                  Re: is 220 cheaper than 110?

                  Still not technically accurate. With what you state if the motor draws more amperage at 120, less amperage at 240 would work out to the same.
                  With pump motors (which is what I am referring to) at 115 volts they start much slower than when supplied with 230 volts. The difference is measurable and not only would it save money, no matter how slight, it is also less strain on the windings which gives them more longevity.
                  Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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