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Yet another sub-panel question?

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  • Yet another sub-panel question?

    In the midst of adding a new kitchen to an 1800's home here. The service has been upgraded to 200 amp at some point in the past 5-10 yrs but, as there is a mix of new and old wiring, space is limited. It seemed easier to install a sub-panel adjacent to the main for the new ktchn ccts.
    Now , I expected to see a lug-type sub, but instead it is a 100 amp main breaker type connected to the load center through a 50 amp dbl pole.
    Since this was signed off, it's obviously permitted but I can't understand: is it 50 or 100 amps and why the redundancy?

  • #2
    Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

    Current is limited by the 50A breaker in the main panel. Sometimes it is easier to find a larger main panel especially when shopping at home depot instead of a good supply store. The 100A breaker on the 'sub panel' has no real function.

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    • #3
      Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

      Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
      Current is limited by the 50A breaker in the main panel. Sometimes it is easier to find a larger main panel especially when shopping at home depot instead of a good supply store. The 100A breaker on the 'sub panel' has no real function.
      Couldn't have said it better.

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      • #4
        Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

        Thank you for your replies. Clearly the 100 amp breaker is redundant; though my wording was perhaps awkward , I was wondering why a 50 amp fed sub panel would require, essentially, a 100 amp off switch.
        The answer in this locale is: 100 amp rated panel are preferred not only for ease of availability but as the minimum rating for an inside install.
        Also, the locality prefers a way to switch off the entire sub w/ out accessing main panel.

        Now, this next may deserve it's own thread but- at some point down the road I will put up a garage/barn for the same customers. The idea of another sub-panel doesn't seem a good one. Today the discussion turned to installation of a pass-thru panel w/ one meter providing 2-200amp main panels. Any thought/opinions here?

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        • #5
          Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

          Originally posted by Bldr View Post
          Also, the locality prefers a way to switch off the entire sub w/ out accessing main panel.
          This is not true at all. If the sub-panel is within the same structure as the main then it does NOT require a main disconnect or even a local one.
          If your AHJ's are requiring this then they are pulling this requirement from their butts.


          A residential 320/400A, single meter, two-200A panel service is quite common these days.

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          • #6
            Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

            Well, whether from his butt or no, the main breaker sub is what he got. It's a rural area here & until recently a hand drawn sketch would suffice as a "blueprint" in one township.
            It's funny though, last spring the building insp was requiring the use of 2x12 rafters on a 10/12 pitch in a non-occupied, no utilities, 12x12 garden shed. Seemed a little overkill.

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            • #7
              Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

              Originally posted by Bldr View Post
              Well, whether from his butt or no, the main breaker sub is what he got.
              You're in NY. You should find a new inspector that has a clue.


              Originally posted by Bldr View Post
              It's a rural area here & until recently a hand drawn sketch would suffice as a "blueprint" in one township.
              This is not at all uncommon for smaller jobs.

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              • #8
                Re: Yet another sub-panel question?

                The 100A might have been the choice based on availability of amperage and space combos. Maybe the 100A had the 12/24 spaces required or whatever the case may be and nothing small had enough space. A 60A may have only had 4 spaces...
                Ideal Plumbing

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