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  • Can someone identify this wire?

    I have a 60ft 4 cable heavy duty cable which was used for a patch panel and it has markings on it, could someone please put into plain non electrical english what these markings mean? I don't need it and am looking to sell it. Any idea what a cable like this is worth?

    I understand some basics for electrical but that's about it.

    Carol 8/4 90c (UL) Water Resistant - SOW (-40c) FT-2-P-123-70 MSHA - Made in USA - 600V
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Can someone identify this wire?

    I can do this:

    CAROL........... brand name of wire manufacturer
    8/4............... 8 gauge 4 wires [black, white, green, red]
    90C.....maximum working temperature[hot] before insulation failure
    UL................ UL listed
    water resistant........water resistant use
    -40C....coldest working temperature before insulation failure
    SOW.....................S=appliance cord stranded conductors cotton layer between wire and insulation
    jute fillers rubber outer jacket [individual wire insulation] extra hard service
    O=neoprene jacket [outer insulation]
    W=wet environment
    FT-2-P-123-70 MSHA.....manufacturer identification/part number
    Made in USA...................made in America
    600v..............maximum working voltage

    Value....whatever the current price is for copper by the pound

    Cactus Man

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Can someone identify this wire?

      i have plenty of the same cable in 6/4 for temporary power distribution boxes with 50 amp ends.

      brand new i pay 200.00 for 50' with ends.

      used with no ends, jump on $1.00-1.25 per foot.

      some home shop welder could use it for a 40 amp machine.


      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Re: Can someone identify this wire?

        Thanks guys, actually I have a mig welder so maybe I'll keep it and make an extension cable. The one end already has the plug for a dryer outlet.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Can someone identify this wire?

          You might find that it is Submersible pump cable. The colors are right, Red, Black and Yellow with the Green ground. It would be for a rather large motor, probably in the 7.5 to 10 hp range.
          Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Can someone identify this wire?

            SO or SOW is cordage, not cable. It is not intended for hard wired applications* but as cords for appliances or as extension cords. It is not to be run in hidden locations, buried or run in walls.

            * It can be used as the cord for a machinhe that is hard wired to a junction box

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Can someone identify this wire?

              Originally posted by rjniles View Post
              SO or SOW is cordage, not cable. It is not intended for hard wired applications* but as cords for appliances or as extension cords. It is not to be run in hidden locations, buried or run in walls.

              * It can be used as the cord for a machinhe that is hard wired to a junction box
              You can bury it in conduit. Its done everyday.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Can someone identify this wire?

                Originally posted by TheMaster View Post
                You can bury it in conduit. Its done everyday.
                It may be done everyday but it is a violation of NEC 400.8(6) which prohibits the use of flexible cords in raceways (conduit).
                If it is a job done with a permit and inspected it will fail. Only listed cable or wire is allowed in raceways (buried or not).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Can someone identify this wire?

                  Originally posted by rjniles View Post
                  It may be done everyday but it is a violation of NEC 400.8(6) which prohibits the use of flexible cords in raceways (conduit).
                  If it is a job done with a permit and inspected it will fail. Only listed cable or wire is allowed in raceways (buried or not).
                  Sorry but it doesn't fail and its done all over the country. Have you ever installed a sewage grinder pump?


                  Click on this link and look at the grinder buried and the control panel mounted on the wall. How do you think the wires get to the control panel?
                  http://www.cityofwhitehouse.com/index.aspx?NID=178

                  They use SJOW cord.
                  Last edited by TheMaster; 07-30-2011, 06:58 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Can someone identify this wire?

                    The specific use that you cite may be an allowed exception, but in general, cordage is not permitted in concealed locations or raceways.
                    Portable cord

                    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
                    A portable cord, which is also known as portable cordage or flexible cord, is a cable with multiple conductors used for functions requiring flexibility. The cord can be employed for power in a range of applications, such as operating motors in small and large tools, equipment, power extensions, home appliances and machinery.
                    Portable cords may be used in commercial, industrial and residential applications. They work well on job sites where resistance to oil, chemicals and abrasion is vital and also perform well in extreme environments - both the heat and the cold, outside or inside. Additionally, some portable cords can be water-resistant or water submersible. Because of their characteristics, portable cords are commonly used in a range of facilities, such as construction sites, mills, mines, sports complexes, or even marinas.
                    Although the construction of a portable cord varies depending on the type, a standard cord has at least two stranded copper conductors. The copper stranding, insulation and jacket directly influence the physical properties of the cord.





                    Varieties

                    A variety of portable cords, differing in styles, lengths and thicknesses, exist in the marketplace. Common types include Type SJT, SVT, SEOW, SJ, SJOW, SO and SOW. Each has specific applications associated with it. A portable cord is usually made of thermoset, thermoplastic elastomer, or thermoplastic. Thermoset cords have heavy-duty-grade rubber jackets and are extremely sturdy. Thermoplastic elastomer cords have medium-duty-grade thermoplastic elastomer jackets and perform well in cold conditions. Thermoplastic cords have a light-duty plastic compound jacket and thus work for light-duty use.
                    Portable Cord Letter Connotations

                    The letters used to describe portable cords hold significance. Below are the meanings for each letter.
                    • S = 600 Volt Service Cord
                    • J = Junior Service - 300 Volt
                    • T = Thermoplastic
                    • E = Elastomer - thermoplastic that looks and feels like rubber
                    • O = Oil Resistant Outer Jacket
                    • OO = Oil Resistant Outer Jacket and Oil Resistant Insulation
                    • W = CSA Weather and Water Resistant (approved for indoor and outdoor use)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Can someone identify this wire?

                      Originally posted by speedbump View Post
                      You might find that it is Submersible pump cable. The colors are right, Red, Black and Yellow with the Green ground. It would be for a rather large motor, probably in the 7.5 to 10 hp range.
                      Wow.

                      The colors mean that it's for a pump... Really?

                      There is no yellow there either, you have black, white, red, green... just like every other 10/4 8/4 6/4 temporary construction power line I've ever seen.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Can someone identify this wire?

                        to: The Master,

                        I did a little more research into the specific installation you cited as using cordage in conduit from the control box to the grinder pump in a sump.

                        From NEC 2011 (and this provision has been in for quite a few previous code cycles)


                        400.7 Permitted uses: (6) Connection of utilization equipment to facilitate frequent change.

                        400.8 Uses not permitted (6) When installed in raceways, except as otherwise permitted in this code.

                        NEC code is always open to interpretation: Mine is: THWN wire should be used in the conduit from the control box to a junction box in the top of the sump, from that junction box SOJW (SOOJW) cordage down the grinder pump.

                        However I can easily see why others might feel that it is OK to run cordage all the way from the control box to the pump in a continuous run.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Can someone identify this wire?

                          Originally posted by rjniles View Post
                          to: The Master,

                          I did a little more research into the specific installation you cited as using cordage in conduit from the control box to the grinder pump in a sump.

                          From NEC 2011 (and this provision has been in for quite a few previous code cycles)


                          400.7 Permitted uses: (6) Connection of utilization equipment to facilitate frequent change.

                          400.8 Uses not permitted (6) When installed in raceways, except as otherwise permitted in this code.

                          NEC code is always open to interpretation: Mine is: THWN wire should be used in the conduit from the control box to a junction box in the top of the sump, from that junction box SOJW (SOOJW) cordage down the grinder pump.

                          However I can easily see why others might feel that it is OK to run cordage all the way from the control box to the pump in a continuous run.
                          Like I said its done everyday and it passes inspection and is perfectly legal.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rjniles is right. There are times when it's allowed to be used in conduit for physical protection in above ground installations, but for the most part its not allowed. When its used for physical protection it can't be longer than 50ft and still has to follow other rules such as derating and conduit fill rules. That one 8-4 cord would require a min of 1 1/4 conduit to be compliant. Many times an inspector will overlook what the code says and sign off on something but that does not make it perfectly legal.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              looks a lot like the 50 amp supply cord typically used in larger rv's and 5th wheel campers
                              shooting the s*** is a lot more fun when you use hollow points (much more splatter)

                              coffee hell gimme booze!!!

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