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  • Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

    The three-lamp kitchen table chandelier is on the same circuit as wall-switched recessed ceiling lights.
    I found and installed a three-way rotary switch on the chandelier so that its lamps can be OFF, .: , .: , or .: when the ceiling lights are ON.
    Can I legally run a single 120-Volt wire down to a SPDT chandelier switch so justhe chandelier lights can be ON withouthe ceiling lights having to be on?

    Thank you.
    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

  • #2
    Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

    Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
    The three-lamp kitchen table chandelier is on the same circuit as wall-switched recessed ceiling lights.
    I found and installed a three-way rotary switch on the chandelier so that its lamps can be OFF, .: , .: , or .: when the ceiling lights are ON.
    Can I legally run a single 120-Volt wire down to a SPDT chandelier switch so justhe chandelier lights can be ON withouthe ceiling lights having to be on?

    Thank you.
    Only if you have conduit to pull it through. If you have cable (NM) you need to pull a new cable up to the ceiling box.
    Licensed Electrician

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

      Originally posted by John Valdes View Post
      Only if you have conduit to pull it through. If you have cable (NM) you need to pull a new cable up to the ceiling box.
      Thank you.
      I have 14-2 NM which I think I can manage to fish up a wall into the ceiling. Do not wanto try if I can't legally weave a lampcord wire down the chain (withexisting lampcord) to the lamp.
      Can I split the lampcord and use just one wire? (I have never known of an always-energized lampcord running down to a lamp.)
      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

        No you cant by code run just one "wire" by itself. A neutral or return wire (eg, hot and switchleg)must be ran . Your using 2cond zip cord (not wire) which is not listed for splitting and running one cond by itself. That said, the idea is to have all donductors running closely to one another to avoid hysterisis. Although its better to find a three conductor cord to use,(yes, one of the existing conductors is a neutral) Your probably ok as long as they are all bundled tightly together and you realize your ul listing is shot anyway for messing with the lamp cord.

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        • #5
          Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

          I believe what you are looking to do is to actually run "3" wires to the table chandelier. One wire being constantly hot but controlled from the wall switch (will connect to the SPDT switch common terminal), the netrual, and a wire from one of the postions of the SPDT switch inside the table chandelier to provide power to the ceiling lights. This can be done but not recommended. It is best to take your 14-2/WG (providing the exisitng circuit is also 14 gauge, you must match the wire size already installed.) and run it to the juction box of the celing lights to the switch box. You would then add an additional single gang electrical box either to the existing switch box provided it is a sectional box, or remove the existing ?gang box and add an "old work" ?+1 gang box for a single pole switch. Another option that would be the easiest is simply run the wire to the existing swtich box and add a single gang device that has two single pole switches similar to a Leviton 5334-I to replace the currently installed switch.

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          • #6
            Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

            It's best to check the circuit amperage (at panel) to determin the corect wire size. Too often I see #14 used on an existing 20a ckt.

            Also, if your area is under the 2011 NEC you have to run a neutral all the way to the switch box.

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            • #7
              Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

              Also, if your area is under the 2011 NEC you have to run a neutral all the way to the switch box.[/QUOTE]

              I didn't know the latest code no longer allows switch legs. Not a bad thing I guess because most people never identified the white as a hot or ran two white wires to the device. Guess they thought it was easier to connect black to black when running to the switch box.


              Thanks for the information!!!

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              • #8
                Re: Can I run single "Hot" wire from ceiling down chain to kitchen table chandelier?

                Originally posted by Maintenance_Man View Post
                Also, if your area is under the 2011 NEC you have to run a neutral all the way to the switch box.
                I didn't know the latest code no longer allows switch legs. Not a bad thing I guess because most people never identified the white as a hot or ran two white wires to the device. Guess they thought it was easier to connect black to black when running to the switch box.

                Thanks for the information!!![/QUOTE]

                I didnt say it does not alow switchlegs. The code is requiring a neutral to be ran to switches because there are new switch devices (like timers and dimmers) that utilize power. The intent is not to use the ground (egc) as the return to the circuit.

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